Woodcock ruled out for Reds clash

first_imgReplacements:16. James Parsons*17. Angus Ta’avao*18. Liaki Moli19. Chris Lowrey20. Alby Mathewson21. Michael Hobbs22. Benson Stanley (50th Blues game) Another casualty: Tony WoodcockProp Tony Woodcock suffered an acute calf strain at training yesterday and has been ruled out of tomorrow night’s match against the Reds.This latest casualty means Tevita Mailau moves into the starting line-up to replace Woodcock and Auckland prop Angus Ta’avao will be the bench replacement.In the absence of Keven Mealamu, Luke Braid will again captain the team.Some good news on the injury front is Rudi Wulf returns to the side this week after a shoulder injury kept him out of last week’s match against the Highlanders. Starting XV:1. Tevita Mailau2. Tom McCartney3. Charlie Faumuina4. Ali Williams5. Filo Paulo6. Daniel Braid7. Luke Braid ©8. Peter Saili9. Piri Weepu10. Gareth Anscombe11. Rudi Wulf12. Ma’a Nonu13. Rene Ranger14. George Moala15. Hadleigh Parkes* DUNEDIN, NEW ZEALAND – APRIL 20: Tony Woodcock of the Blues tries to tackle Aaron Smith of The Highlanders during the round nine Super Rugby match between the Highlanders and the Blues at Forsyth Barr Stadium on April 20, 2012 in Dunedin, New Zealand. (Photo by Teaukura Moetaua/Getty Images) * – Wider Training GroupUnavailable – Tony Woodcock (calf) Keven Mealamu (calf), Jerome Kaino (shoulder) Isaia Toeava (hip) and Anthony Boric (neck) LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

Ireland 46-24 Argentina: The Verdict

first_imgArgentina’s Juan Martin Fernandez Lobbe (L) wins a line out against Ireland’s Peter O’Mahony during the Autumn International rugby union match between Ireland and Argentina at the Aviva stadium in Dublin, Ireland on November 24, 2012. AFP PHOTO/ PETER MUHLY (Photo credit should read PETER MUHLY/AFP/Getty Images) IRELAND: Simon Zebo; Tommy Bowe (Fergus McFadden 74), Keith Earls, Gordon D’Arcy, Craig Gilroy; Jonathan Sexton (Ronan O’Gara 72), Conor Murray (Eoin Reddan 72); Cian Healy (David Kilcoyne 74), Richardt Strauss (Sean Cronin 74), Mike Ross (Michael Bent 68), Donnacha Ryan, Mike McCarthy (Donncha O’Callaghan 63), Peter O’Mahony (Iain Henderson 72), Chris Henry, Jamie Heaslip (captain).Tries: Gilroy, Sexton (2), Strauss, Zebo, Bowe (2). Cons: Sexton 3, O’Gara 1. Pen: SextonARGENTINA: Juan Martin Hernandez; Gonzalo Camacho, Marcelo Bosch, Santiago Fernandez, Juan Imhoff (Manuel Montero 54); Nicolas Sanchez (Gonzalo Tiesi 22-25, 61), Martin Landajo (Nicolas Vergallo 69); Marcos Ayerza (Nahuel Lobo 69), Eusebio Guinazu (Agustin Creevy 57), Maximiliano Bustos, Manuel Carizza, Julio Farias Cabello, Juan Martin Fernandez Lobbe (captain), Juan Manuel Leguizamon (Tomas Leonardi 55), Leonardo Senatore (Francisco Gomez Kodela 65), Tomas Vallejos, .Tries: Leonardi, Fernandez Lobbe. Cons: Hernandez 2. Pens: Sanchez, 4 Out of reach: Sexton scores his second try as Ireland proved too much for the PumasBy Katie Field, Rugby World writerIn a nutshellALL EXPECTATIONS of a close match were blown away in the first half as Ireland raced to a 24-9 lead with some bold, enterprising rugby. With eight minutes to go the half-century looked to be on the cards as they led 46-12 thanks to seven tries, but Ireland took their foot off the gas and allowed Argentina to grab two late consolation scores. It looked like a game too far for the tourists, who have had the busiest year in their history after being admitted to the Southern Hemisphere’s new Rugby Championship.Ireland were superior up front and absolutely ruthless about taking their scoring chances. This record win against the Pumas guarantees Ireland a top-eight seeding for the 2015 World Cup when the draw takes place on 3 December.Key momentIreland scored three good tries in the first 21 minutes but allowed Argentina two penalties, so were still within touching distance at 19-6 up as the half-hour mark approached. The Pumas looked like narrowing the gap even further as they attacked inside the Ireland 22 but the home side held firm and conceded just a penalty, making the score 19-9 instead of a possible 19-13. From the re-start, Ireland launched another attack which Simon Zebo rounded off for their fourth try and at 24-9 up they were suddenly almost out of sight.Star manWork in progress: Argentina were let down by their lineoutCraig Gilroy caught the eye from the outset, popping up all over the place in attack, stepping, darting and sprinting and scoring a fine opening try. It was an eye-catching Test debut from the Ulster wing. Peter O’Mahony had an outstanding game at blindside but the Man of the Match for his work at the set pieces and his major contributions in attack and defence was lock Donnacha Ryan.Room for improvementArgentina looked tired after their busy year but there were still a couple of critical areas they will be disappointed with. Firstly the lineout – they had lost six on their own throw against France the week before and lost two out of two in the first half in Dublin.The Pumas’ defence was also too passive – they stood off and drifted and dropped off tackles as Ireland came flying at them in numbers.Ireland were rarely found wanting. They scored 39 points in the first 53 minutes but just seven more thereafter, as they lost their shape a little and Argentina improved. The host of replacements that came on in the closing stages disrupted their patterns but the game was won by then.In quotes – winnersIreland coach Declan Kidney: “You never, in your wildest dreams, think you will score that number of tries against Argentina… but if I say this was the complete performance I’ll be out of a job. There’s always things to be done.” In quotes – losersArgentina captain Juan Martin Fernandez Lobbe: “That was a sad way to end the season. Rugby is usually won by the team that wants it most and we were over-run in every aspect. Now that we have 12 games a year together we will continue to improve.”Top statsArgentina ended up with 53% of the territory and an equal share of possession, but they missed 17 tackles in the first half as Ireland ran 235m in that period to get up an unstoppable head of steam. Ireland beat 18 defenders and made six clean breaks and won 100% of their mauls.Highlights:center_img Sin-bin: Bustos 63 minReferee: Jaco Peyper (South Africa). LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

Six Nations Round Three: Five Things We Learnt

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Stuart Hogg scores scorching try in Rome sunshine Expand Hamish Watson enhances his Lions chancesBack-row selection for the 2021 Lions tour to South Africa will be incredibly competitive. Challenging for starting spots on the flank will be Tom Curry, Sam Underhill, Josh Navidi, Justin Tipuric, Aaron Wainwright, hopefully Dan Leavy… the list goes on.But Hamish Watson must enter the conversation after an incredible Man of the Match performance against Italy in the Six Nations. He has had an outstanding tournament so far – Scotland’s star man in their losses in the first two rounds – and his performances have only improved alongside partner-in-crime Jamie Ritchie.Yes, Italy’s forwards were poor, but some credit has to go to Watson’s mongoose-like performance. He was the top Scottish tackler with 19 and carried for 62 metres, more than any other forward on the pitch except for Jake Polledri. He also won two turnovers on the ground. And he wears his tartan collar like vintage Eric Cantona.The last Scottish back-rower to appear in a Lions Test was Rob Wainwright back in 1997; Watson has an excellent chance of being the next 24 years later.Italy’s traditional strengths and weaknesses have been flipped Italy had most of their Six Nations success between 2007 and 2013, a period in which they reached their highest-ever world ranking of eighth.Their success was built on an excellent generation of forwards who often achieved set-piece dominance and generally ensured quick ball. Seven of their starting pack were usually unchanged – Andrea Lo Cicero, Leonardo Ghiraldini, Martin Castrogiovanni, Marco Bortolami, Alessandro Zanni, Mauro Bergamasco and Sergio Parisse would each win a century of caps.Conversely their back-line often struggled. After the retirements of Diego Dominguez in 2003 and Alessandro Troncon in 2007 they had no consistent half-back partnership, whilst their only world-class back was the protean Mirco Bergamasco (with an honourable mention for Andrea Masi).Fast-forward to 2020 and their game against Scotland, and the landscape couldn’t look more different. The Italian back-line looks sharp. Tommaso Allan is playing the best rugby of his life, whilst half-back partner Callum Braley looks experienced beyond his years. I wrote two weeks ago about how Carlo Canna’s introduction as a secondary distributor for Italy has sparked the Azzuri back-line – and this was on full display in Rome on Saturday.Italy made more metres than Scotland, despite two Scottish breakaway tries, and wings Matteo Minozzi and Mattia Bellini sparkled, particularly in the first half. However, Italy did not score a point, as they fell to a 17-0 defeat.Why? Crucially, they turned the ball over 22 times, time after time being unable to recycle good phase play from the back-line. Italy were also monstered in the scrum, with prop Giosue Zilocchi, who had an impressive first two rounds, hauled off after 30 minutes.The game showed how much Italy’s traditional strengths and weaknesses have changed over the course of the decade. Only Zanni remains from the golden generation of forwards, and whilst Braam Steyn is excellent and Jake Polledri could be talismanic, the forwards lack the depth of Italian teams of yesteryear.This back-line can be dynamic – they just need the ball and the base to perform.Second divisions are crucial to national teams – just look at France This France team look to be the real deal, winning away in Wales for the first time in ten years, against the most experienced XV to ever take the field in the Six Nations. Two tough games await them – away at Murrayfield and at home to Ireland, but they have a brilliant chance to once again begin the decade with a Grand Slam.However, in a period where Championship clubs have had their funding cut by the RFU, France have shown the RFU the flaws in their argument.Just look at their key men this tournament. Gregory Alldritt, who was Man of the Match in their first two games, came through the youth system of FC Auch, who played in the ProD2 and Fédérale 1. Note the past tense – a lack of investment in the lower divisions forced Auch to wind up their professional set-up in 2017. It’s a stark lesson to the RFU on the quality of players they could miss out on.French star: Gregory Alldritt gets a pass away against Wales (Getty Images)Cameron Woki, another highly-rated back-rower, came through at Pro D2 side RC Massy, whilst Demba Bamba, who won a controversial but crucial scrum penalty in the win against Wales, was playing in the second division for Brive when he made his professional debut last year. Stuart Hogg scores scorching try in Rome sunshine Collapse Against Italy, with Vakatawa injured, he was asked to step into the 12 shirt and performed a brilliant job as a second receiver, showing a deft kicking game hitherto unseen at international level.Then with Damian Penaud and Vincent Rattez injured, he moved out to the wing, putting in a performance which merited a try (he had one disallowed), keeping George North and then the dangerous Johnny McNicholl quiet.French players have starred in this tournament. But its time to show some love to a man who has been asked to play a radically different game in each round – and delivered.Rumours of England’s demise have been greatly exaggeratedEngland looked back to their best in their 24-12 win over Ireland, winning games with the emphatic physicality last seen in their semi-final victory over New Zealand.To their credit Ireland stood up manfully, but the ball rarely progressed into their back-line, with remorseless midfield pressure put upon Johnny Sexton by Sam Underhill, Maro Itoje and Courtney Lawes.England needed a performance like this after being outmuscled by France and held close by Scotland in atrocious conditions, and still have a decent chance of winning the title if France slip up in their next two games – although they could regret not seizing the bonus point.And what about Eddie Jones’s team selection? Joe Marler was excellent in the scrum against Tadhg Furlong, Lawes won Man of the Match despite getting deployed on the flank, and Jonathan Joseph outstepped Jordan Larmour, although Ireland surprisingly did not test him in the air.With Wales up next at Twickenham, who have lost their last two, England will be feeling confident. Full-back Anthony Bouthier, unlucky not to win MOTM in Cardiff, is perhaps the starkest example – this is his first season playing in the Top 14, having played for Vannes, a ProD2 club, for over half a decade.Teams such as Nottingham have warned that they may not be able to survive budget cuts, whilst the likes of Jersey Reds and Ealing Trailfinders are clubs on the rise. France have shown the importance of these second-tier clubs.Gael Fickou has been a quiet standoutA while ago and Gael Fickou was an enigma. Capable of brilliant moments – like the winning try against England at the age of only 19 – but also often kept quiet, struggling with the lack of a consistent centre partner since Wesley Fofana’s injury troubles.However, with Romain Ntamack and Virimi Vakatawa now established in this France team, Fickou’s form has been excellent, despite often being overshadowed by the contributions of Ntamack, Antoine Dupont and Bernard Le Roux.The last three games have really shown Fickou’s flexibility, as he has been asked to play three different roles by Fabien Galthié. In the win over England he led France’s defensive press from 13, a key role in Shaun Edwards’s system, which Jonathan Davies has done so well for the past decade for Wales.MORE FROM THE SIX NATIONS The French beat Wales 27-23 in dramatic game… Johnny Sexton fumble leads to George Ford try Johnny Sexton fumble leads to George Ford try On the ball: Scotland flanker Hamish Watson tests Italy’s defence (Getty Images) Expand Irish errors play part in England’s 24-12 win… France keep Grand Slam bid on track with win in Cardiff France keep Grand Slam bid on track with win in Cardiff Stuart Hogg scores scorching try in Rome sunshine… From the excellence of Gael Fickou and Hamish Watson to the Italy’s role reversal, Jacob Whitehead reflects on the weekend’s happenings The March 2020 issue of Rugby World magazine – a Six Nations special – is on sale now.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.last_img read more

Wales v England dominated by controversial try decisions

first_img Wales v England dominated by controversial try decisionsWales took the lead in their Six Nations match against England in Cardiff with two controversial tries.They eventually won the fixture 40-24 to lift the Triple Crown but it was two first-half decisions that caused the most debate.Related: Rugby World verdict on the Triple Crown winThe first came in the 17th minute. The scores were level at 3-3 after Dan Biggar and Owen Farrell had exchanged early penalties when Wales were awarded another penalty inside the England 22.Farrell had conceded that penalty and asked referee Pascal Gauzere for time to talk to his players, who he gathered in a huddle under the posts.Gauzere blew for time off and as soon as he restarted play, Biggar kicked cross field and Josh Adams gathered the ball to score. Even the players looked surprised that the try stood but Biggar converted to give Wales a 17-6 lead.Matt Dawson described the decision as “shocking” on BBC Radio 5Live and it caused controversy on Twitter too. Plenty of debate over Wales’ two first-half touchdowns LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Then after half an hour, Wales were awarded another try – again in controversial circumstances.Adams kicked through into the England 22, Louis Rees-Zammit couldn’t gather the ball but as it went loose Liam Williams collected it and went over.Most people thought that it was a knock-on from Rees-Zammit but TMO Alex Ruiz ruled that he couldn’t see him “knock the ball forward. It touched his leg and then the ball went backwards”. Biggar’s conversion made it 10-3 – but England were not happy. They had still been talking under the posts and the water carriers were on the pitch when Biggar kicked crossfield and were not able to react in time to stop Adams out wide.Farrell approached Gauzere as soon as Adams had touched down to appeal the decision to award the try, but the referee said: “I allowed you time to give the message and after that it was play on.”Farrell closed the gap with another penalty shortly afterwards to make it 10-6 after 20 minutes, but the try decision has caused debate on social media. TAGS: Highlight Josh Adams scores Wales’ opening try (Getty Images) An Anthony Watson try in the 35th minute as England attacked in the 22 brought them back into the game and Farrell further narrowed the gap with a penalty in front of the posts in added time.That made it 17-14 at half-time and an intriguing second period awaited.Midway through the second half it was 24-24 after tries from scrum-halves Kieran Hardy and Ben Youngs, but Wales pulled clear to win 40-24 as England conceded a succession of penalties and Cory Hill scored the bonus-point try. Gauzere is right. You don’t get the opportunity to line up all your men first. This isn’t a battle in the 7th century.— Sam Larner (@SamLStandsUp) February 27, 2021 Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.last_img read more

Who is Sean Maitland: Ten things you should know about the Scotland back

first_img Sean Maitland in action for Scotland during the Six Nations (Getty Images) Who is Sean Maitland: Ten things you should know about the Scotland backSean Maitland made his debut for Scotland against England in the 2013 Six Nations. The star is able to play at both wing and full-back, though he plays the majority of his rugby on the wing.Ten things you should know about Sean Maitland1. Sean Maitland was born 14 September 1988 in Tokoroa, New Zealand. He is eligible to play for Scotland because his grandparents were born in Scotland.2. He stands at 6ft 1in (1.85m) and weighs 15st 13lb (101kg).3. Maitland started his pro rugby career in New Zealand, where he played for Canterbury and the Crusaders. He moved to Glasgow Warriors in 2012 before joining Premiership club London Irish in 2015.He signed for Saracens in 2016 and he remained at the club when they were relegated to the Championship in 2020.4. During his time with Saracens he has won two Premiership trophies, in 2018 and 2019, and he scored a try in the 2019 final against Exeter Chiefs. He also won the European Champions Cup in 2017 and 2019 – he missed the 2017 final through injury but scored a try in the 2019 final. Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. Is Sean Maitland married?7. He married his long-term partner, Nava, in 2015 and the couple have two daughters together, Lucy and Lily. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALScenter_img 8. If he didn’t play in the back three, he would want to play at No.8.In a Q&A for Saracens in 2018. he said: “They seem like they have a pretty cool job and they get a lot of flexibility. You see Billy (Vunipola) in the back field, he’s like another full-back. You get your hands on the ball and get to carry a lot.”9. In 2020, Maitland was among 13 Barbarians players who breached Covid rules, which resulted in their match against England being cancelled. He was handed a four-week ban, three of which were suspended.10. Maitland is related to other rugby stars. Australia‘s Quade Cooper and Samoa’s Pele Cowley are both cousins of his. 5. Maitland was part of the 2013 British & Irish Lions squad that toured Australia. While he was selected in the match-day 23 for the first Test, he didn’t come off of the bench to win a cap.6. Outside of rugby, his hobbies include playing the guitar and golf. Find out more about the star who is comfortable on the wing and at full-backlast_img read more

Women’s Six Nations Team Guide 2021

first_imgVital statisticEngland’s defence was miserly last year as they conceded just 20 points in their five Six Nations matches. The fact they scored 219 points meant their points difference was 199!FRANCEFrance waltzed to a Grand Slam in 2018, but they have struggled to find that consistency since. In 2019, they were stunned by Italy in the final round of the Six Nations before they themselves stunned the Black Ferns 25-16 a few months later.Last year they dismantled Wales and Italy but stumbled to a 13-13 draw with Scotland and lost three times to England. The most recent defeat by the Red Roses will have been the most painful as they were in a commanding position at Twickenham before conceding a last-minute penalty.The biggest challenge for Annick Hayraud and her coaching team is to instil the mindset that sees players deliver across the 80 minutes.There are quality players throughout the France squad – Jessy Tremouliere, Cyrielle Banet, Laure Sansus and Marjorie Mayans among them – but a little less chopping and changing when it comes to selection might allow them to build a better game understanding.Cyrielle Banet scores against England last November (Getty Images)In the plus column is the fact that club rugby returned after a four-month break in mid-February, so players have been able to sharpen skills and build match fitness before the Six Nations.Key playerThe fact Gaelle Hermet was made captain of France at just 21 gives you an idea of her leadership credentials and importance to the team.The Toulouse back-rower has been in the role for more than three years now and drives her team forward with deeds as much as words. She’s a threat with ball in hand and is strong defensively, be it making tackles or winning turnovers.One to watchRose Bernadou comes from a rugby family but her rise to Test honours came quicker than expected as she made her debut against Scotland last autumn.France prop Rose Bernadou carries against Scotland (AFP/Getty Images)The prop, 22, is known for her powerful runs but she also likes the more unseen work of her role at the scrum and breakdown.Vital statisticFrance are on a seven-match losing streak against England, who they will also meet in the pool stages of the next World Cup in New Zealand.IRELANDAnthony Eddy, the IRFU director of women’s rugby, has spoken of finding the positives in tournament delays and match cancellations, pointing to having more preparation time and the players’ “commendable attitude and resilience”. Yet there must be serious concerns around exactly how well prepared the team will be for the Six Nations.They have played just one Test in the last 12 months and the majority of their players haven’t had any other games because club rugby in Ireland has been suspended due to the pandemic.Yes, they have a handful of players performing in the Premier 15s, but most of Adam Griggs’s squad have been limited to training sessions.They have looked to add a competitive element to those camps, with lots of game scenarios and internal matches, but nothing can replicate a Test.There’s no shortage of talent, older heads like Claire Molloy, Ciara Griffin and Sene Naoupu complemented by youngsters Dorothy Wall and Beibhinn Parsons. But their fortunes in this tournament will hinge on whether they can hit the ground running.Key playerBeing named Women’s Player of the Year at the 2020 Rugby Players Ireland Awards is testament to Cliodhna Moloney’s progress.Cliodhna Moloney tries to evade Wales’ defence (Sportsfile/Getty Images)The 27-year-old hooker is not only impressive in the set-piece exchanges but she has a knack for producing game-changing moments – she scored two tries and won four turnovers in last year’s championship, the best return of any Ireland player. Plus, as a regular at Wasps she has the benefit of being ‘match fit’.One to watchBeibhinn Parsons is the youngest Ireland international in history, making her debut off the bench against the USA in 2018 aged just 16. The winger is still a teenager but is a regular in the Ireland team and scored tries against Scotland and Wales last year.Ireland will look to get the most out of the powerful runner, who not only has pace but the ability to change direction at speed. Better weather conditions in this new window should help with that.Vital statistic  Ireland are the only team to have broken the England-France duopoly on the Six Nations in the past 20 years, winning the title in 2013 (Grand Slam) and 2015.ITALYFollowing an historic second-place finish in 2019, when they stunned France 31-12 in their final game, the Azzurre were unable to back it up last year. They won just one of the four matches they played, a 19-15 victory in Wales, and were thumped 54-0 by England in the final round.On the positive news front, Italy haven’t suffered any serious injury blows and have welcomed back Manuela Furlan. The captain was sorely missed last spring but returned for the delayed fixtures last autumn and is raring to go this season.Sara Barattin clears against England (Inpho)Coach Andrea Di Giandomenico highlighted “a lack of precision” in their 21-7 loss to Ireland in October and was hoping for a more aggressive defence against England, but instead they were whitewashed by the Red Roses in Parma.They start this season’s championship against the same opposition so have an opportunity to address those areas and show improvements, albeit that England remain overwhelming favourites. It could be a difficult campaign for Italy, with a lack of game time again an issue.Key playerScrum-half Sara Barattin and full-back Manuela Furlan bring plenty of experience, but it’s Giada Franco in the back row who is becoming a real spark for this Italy team.She’s still only 24 but enjoyed a breakthrough campaign two years ago, with her ability to give Italy front-foot ball crucial to securing second spot.Back-rower Giada Franco is an important figure in the Italy squad (Sportsfile/Getty Images)Her time at Harlequins helped develop her game and she enjoys her all-court position, saying: “Back-row is the best role in rugby. You have to be good in defence but good in attack as well. It’s the most complete role in rugby.”Italy will need her to tick all those boxes if they are to secure any wins in this condensed tournament.One to watchVittoria Ostuni Minuzzi, who plays her club rugby for Valsugana Padova, made her Italy debut in last year’s Six Nations and was involved in all four matches.The 19-year-old cites speed as one of her strengths and she put that to good use by making more metres than any other Italy back in the 2020 tournament. In fact, her and Franco were the only Italians to make more than 200 metres.Vital statisticItaly impressed at the breakdown in the 2020 championship, with Elisa Giordano (seven) and Michela Sillari (five) winning more turnovers than any other players.SCOTLANDThe pandemic has affected all teams but Scotland arguably had the worst of it in 2020.They were only able to play two games in the original Six Nations window before being hit by postponements, then they lost their coach Philip Doyle, who had to shield on medical grounds. Just as they were building some momentum with a confidence-boosting 13-13 draw with France in October, their remaining championship games got cancelled.Scottish Rugby have been investing more in their women’s programme, with qualifying for the next World Cup (now in 2022 rather than 2021) the big goal having failed to make it to the 2014 and 2017 tournaments.There have been signs of improvement – that draw with France significant – but they’re still searching for their first Six Nations win since 2018 and must make further strides if they’re to get to New Zealand.Bryan Easson has stepped up to the head coach role, with a contract until RWC 2025, and he has talented players at his disposal – Lisa Thomson, Chloe Rollie and Rachel Malcolm have stood out in recent years.But they need to become more competitive as a collective against higher-ranked sides – and the loss of Jade Konkel is a big blow. The No 8, whose powerful carries far more often than not got her over the gain-line, is taking a break from rugby to become a firefighter.Key playerOther players will need to step up in Konkel’s absence and captain Malcolm has been full of praise for centre Lisa Thomson.“She’s the most well-rounded player we have in the team,” says Malcolm. “She’s world class as a centre and for Scotland to play well Lisa Thomson is usually on the money as well.” Captains Sarah Hunter, Manuela Furlan, Rachel Malcolm, Ciara Griffin, Gaelle Hermet and Siwan Lillicrap (Inpho) All you need to know about the countries competing for this year’s championship title One to watchBig things are expected of Leah Bartlett, the 22-year-old loosehead who made her Scotland debut last year.She has been playing since the age of five, is part of the Loughborough Lightning Premier 15s squad and was involved in the England U20 set-up before representing the land of her parents.Vital statisticNo 8 Jade Konkel made 77 carries in last year’s Six Nations – more than any other player. It’s a remarkable stat when you consider Scotland played only three matches. As a comparison, CJ Stander was the top carrier in the 2020 men’s Six Nations with 78 but that was across five games, so he had an average of just over 15; Konkel was averaging 25! That’s what Scotland will be missing this year.WALESOver the past few months, it’s been all change in Wales’ coaching box. Warren Abrahams is the new head coach, with Geraint Lewis now in charge of the forwards. Sophie Spence, an ex-Ireland lock, has joined the back-room team as a ‘coaching intern’ while Darren Edwards has come in as skills coach following former captain Rachel Taylor’s recent resignation.As Spence told Rugby World, the philosophy is “positive vibes only” under South African Abahams, who has been described as “inspirational” by captain and back-row Siwan Lillicrap.Yet Wales need to ensure that inspiration is evident on the pitch, given that they lost all four of the Six Nations matches they played last year, conceding an average of more than 40 points a game.Qualifying for the next World Cup by finishing seventh at the 2017 edition has meant Wales have been able to trial different combinations and test youngsters in recent seasons. The postponement of the global tournament until 2022 now gives Abrahams the chance to nail down his first-choice XV and develop his game plan in this Six Nations.Gelling is even more challenging given that they haven’t played a Test for more than a year. Many Welsh players are benefiting from regular game time in the Premier 15s, but notable improvements are needed at international level if they are to avoid more hefty scorelines.Key playerAbrahams has spoken of Wales finding their “X-factor”, which should suit Elinor Snowsill. The Bristol fly-half, who missed last year’s Six Nations with injury, is one of Wales’ most experienced players and is known for flair.If Wales are to create chances for the likes of Jasmine Joyce and Hannah Jones, they need Snowsill at her instinctive best, especially on April’s firmer pitches.Elinor Snowsill kicks at goal for Bristol Bears (Getty Images)One to watchManon Johnes turned 20 in December but has been in the national set-up for three years and balances rugby with studying geography at Oxford. Expect the back-rower to excel in both the tight and the loose with her skill-set, which has seen her play on the sevens circuit.Vital statisticAlisha Butchers made 72 tackles in last year’s championship. She was one of four Welsh players in the top five along with Siwan Lillicrap (69), Beth Lewis (62) and Gwenllian Pyrs (62), although only Lillicrap is in this year’s squad.Don’t miss a game with this Women’s Six Nations TV coverage guide. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS TAGS: Highlight Women’s Six Nations Team Guide 2021There’s a new look to this year’s Women’s Six Nations. Not only has the championship switched to a standalone window in April – a move away from the men’s event that could become permanent – but it also has a different format for 2021.Organisers opted to move the tournament to later in the year because of the challenges facing squads of mainly amateur players in light of Covid restrictions. It will be played on back-to-back Saturdays from 3 April.Related: Women’s Six Nations FixturesThe Six Nations will also have a condensed format, although this is expected to be a one-off for 2021. The six teams have been split into two pools, each playing one home and one away fixture with a bye weekend during the group stages. Then they will play the team ranked in the same position as them in the other pool table on a ‘finals weekend’ on 24 April.Pool A consists of England, Italy and Scotland while France, Ireland and Wales are in Pool B – and below we run you through all the teams.Related: New format for 2021 Women’s Six NationsWomen’s Six Nations Team GuideENGLANDThe Red Roses come into this championship with back-to-back Grand Slams but without their veteran fly-half.Katy Daley-Mclean announced her retirement from Test rugby at the end of last year having won 116 caps since her debut in 2007, so Zoe Harrison, Meg Jones and Helena Rowland are now set to battle it out for the No 10 shirt in this Six Nations in the hope of becoming first-choice fly-half for the World Cup, which has been postponed until 2022.Jess Breach takes a selfie with her team after England’s Grand Slam last year (Getty Images)Harrison has long been lined up as the successor but more recently has been playing at inside-centre at Test level, Rowland’s creativity was evident during her debut campaign last autumn and Jones’s form for Wasps means she is in contention too.Whoever plays at fly-half – and Simon Middleton could opt to give different players a start during the championship – they have the benefit of playing behind an outstanding set of forwards.England’s pack will expect to dominate at the set-piece, even without prop Sarah Bern (shoulder injury), while the likes of Poppy Cleall and Shaunagh Brown also make significant ground with ball in hand.Key playerIt’s an obvious one but it’s hard to look beyond Emily Scarratt, particularly now that Daley-Mclean has retired. Scarratt has always played an integral role in the Red Roses back-line and her experience will be key in supporting whoever is at ten.Her goalkicking is superb (she is England’s record point-scorer), she’s a powerful runner who breaks the gain-line (she made more metres than any other player in 2020), she’s uncompromising in defence and her vision sets her apart.It’s little wonder she was named the first Women’s Six Nations Player of the Championship last year, a title to add to her 2019 World Player of the Year gong.One to watchEllie Kildunne, 21, returned to 15s this season after the sevens programme was cut and has impressed at full-back for both Wasps and England. A gliding runner with a decent boot, she will exploit any chinks in defences. Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.last_img read more

England Saxons revert to England ‘A’ name

first_imgAs previously confirmed, England‘s Test team will also play in July, with matches lined up against the USA and Canada.Wales will also play three Tests at the Principality Stadium this summer, starting with Canada on Saturday 3 July, and then two matches against Argentina in the two weeks after.What do you think of the RFU’s decision to drop the ‘Saxons’ name and revert back to their old ‘A’ moniker? Email us with your views at [email protected] England A v South Africa A, 2016 (Getty Images) England Saxons revert to England ‘A’ nameEngland’s second team will no longer be known as the Saxons after the Rugby Football Union decided the name was inappropriate. They revert to their former name of England ‘A’.The A side will play their first game since touring South Africa in 2016, when they face Scotland A on 27 June in Leicester. It is also understood that uncapped players selected for the match will be captured by the respective nations.The Saxons name was introduced in 2006, but the RFU have made the switch “as a better representation of our team today,” said an RFU spokesperson.Related: New dates for Rugby World Cup 2021In April, it was announced that an independent diversity and inclusion advisory group, chaired by ex-England wing Ugo Monye, was being set up to “shape plans” and “challenge the RFU on its progress” in the area. You may also remember in October, the RFU said it would not ban the song ‘Swing Low, Sweet Chariot’ at England games, but would make an effort to educate fans on the song’s “history and provenance” given historic links with slavery. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALScenter_img England A have not played since touring South Africa in 2016 Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.last_img read more

The size of Advent matters

first_img Curate Diocese of Nebraska Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Featured Jobs & Calls Submit a Job Listing Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Submit an Event Listing An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Tags By Phyllis Strupp Posted Dec 13, 2011 Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET The size of Advent matters Submit a Press Release Rector Pittsburgh, PA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Advent Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Bath, NC The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Martinsville, VA center_img Featured Events [Episcopal News Service] A bank recently foreclosed on yet another house in our neighborhood. The family of four had struggled to hang on financially for years, to no avail. One day they came home, and the locks had been changed. The wife was despondent, while the husband was enraged. That very night, he broke into their former home, ripped out all the custom cabinets, and hauled them away. By his reckoning, the bank stole his home, and he settled the score as best he could.Getting even tastes good to the aggrieved party. But Advent reminds us of a bitter truth: in the grand scheme of things, God is the aggrieved party and we are all the transgressors.The period between Thanksgiving and New Year’s has become a great secular spiritual celebration, often referred to as “the holidays.” Thanksgiving, Hanukkah, the winter solstice, Christmas, Kwanza, and New Year’s get lumped into one big lit-up joyfest. Appetites for “picture perfect” holidays are fed by commercial interests pushing a parade of “must haves” or “must dos” that absorb money, time, and attention. Comparatively, Advent is a buzz kill, with the daily office full of doom and gloom readings from the ancient prophets. How easy it is, to avoid “celebrating” this somber side of Christmas. But if you want a traditional Christian version of the holiday season, Advent is a “must do” − and it doesn’t cost a penny!Advent and Christmas used to have more in common. In the 6th century, a penitent Advent season was added to the liturgical calendar. For centuries, Christmas was a more subdued religious holiday celebrated not at home but at church.  Then came Charles Dickens, who helped to transform England’s Christmas celebration into a joyous event, marked by food, family, and charity with his popular story A Christmas Carol. This famous fable describes how the miserable, tight-fisted Ebenezer Scrooge got his groove back through reflection and metanoia (a spiritual paradigm shift, translated from the New Testament Greek as “repentance.”) So it is more about Advent than Christmas! Surely Dickens got his inspiration for Scrooge from the prophet’s words in Ezekiel 28:4-5:By your wisdom and understandingyou have gained wealth for yourselfand amassed gold and silverin your treasuries.By your great skill in tradingyou have increased your wealth,and because of your wealthyour heart has grown proud.Perhaps A Christmas Carol failed to popularize Advent because it is not so easy to conjure up the Ghosts of Christmas Past, Present, and Future. The next best thing to a visit from these three spirits is the teachings of the Old Testament prophets.The lectionary year B is now in full swing, heavy on Advent readings from the prophets Amos and Zechariah with a sprinkling of Isaiah, Habakkuk, and some others. Two notable character traits of the prophets are:1.    They understand measuring.2.    They have a clue about what God is up to.The readings contain numerous references to measuring objects or time as a proxy for how God judges people. For example, Amos speaks of a plumb line (Amos 7:7-9) and a basket of ripe fruit (Amos 8:1-2) as a tool for understanding God’s judgment of Israel. Zechariah writes about God’s messages in terms of a man with a measuring line who plans to measure Jerusalem (Zechariah 2:1-2), a plumb line (Zechariah 4:10), a flying scroll thirty feet long and fifteen feet wide (Zechariah 5:1-2), and a measuring basket (Zechariah 5:5-11).So the prophets seem to be saying that God is just as fond of metrics as we are, but for spiritual matters rather than worldly matters. God uses spiritual metrics that we cannot grasp as easily as a fistful of dollars.These spiritual metrics have a goal: to fulfill God’s vision of how life on earth should be. The prophets really shine in describing compelling visions of what God is up to in the world, then and now. The “A+” for vision goes to Isaiah, Jesus’ favorite prophet, for the compelling way he describes the peaceful creation that God is creating:“They will beat their swords into plowshares and their spears into pruning hooks. Nation will not take up sword against nation, nor will they train for war anymore.” (Isaiah 2:4)“The wolf will live with the lamb, the leopard will lie down with the goat, the calf and the lion and the yearling together; and a little child will lead them.” (Isaiah 11:6)“They will neither harm nor destroy on all my holy mountain, for the earth will be full of the knowledge of the LORD as the waters cover the sea.”  (Isaiah 11:9)In the reading for December 21, Habakkuk 2:1-3 has some great how-to advice on what we can do in our lives and communities to advance God’s vision:Write the vision;make it plain on tablets,so that a runner may read it.For there is still a vision for the appointed time;it speaks of the end, and does not lie.If it seems to tarry, wait for it;it will surely come, it will not delay.Advent calls us to reflect on whether our spiritual account with God is flush or overdrawn. This is a difficult task, which is why Advent lasts for weeks. If you’re concerned about how you measure up spiritually, don’t worry − God’s plumb line is made out of love. We have nothing to fear from coming clean with God, thanks to Jesus Christ, whose birth we celebrate on December 25.As the new year looms large, consider making a resolution to go deeper into the desert experiences of Lent and Advent in 2012.− Phyllis Strupp is the author of Church Publishing’s Faith and Nature curriculum and the author of The Richest of Fare: Seeking Spiritual Security in the Sonoran Desert. She enjoys having her desert experiences in the desert! Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Collierville, TN Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Tampa, FL Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Associate Rector Columbus, GA An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Belleville, IL Rector Smithfield, NC Director of Music Morristown, NJ Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Albany, NY Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Washington, DC Rector Hopkinsville, KY Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Press Release Service Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs last_img read more

W. Nicholas Knisely ordained as Rhode Island’s 13th bishop

first_img Submit a Job Listing By ENS staffPosted Nov 19, 2012 Rector Belleville, IL Bishop Consecrations, Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET June 1, 2013 at 9:32 am Offenders? Really?Where is your Christian charity…..reserved only for those who agree with your liberal views? Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem David Justin Lynch says: Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Featured Events Rector Pittsburgh, PA W. Nicholas Knisely ordained as Rhode Island’s 13th bishop Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Submit a Press Release Tags House of Bishops, An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Collierville, TN In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Anthony Domenico says: Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Hugh Hansen, Ph.D. says: The Very Rev. William Nicholas Knisely Jr. during his Nov. 17 ordination as 13th bishop of the Diocese of Rhode Island. Photo/Richard Schori[Episcopal News Service] Nearly 2,000 Episcopalians gathered Nov. 17 at St. George’s School in Middletown, Rhode Island, for the ordination of the Very Rev. William Nicholas Knisely Jr. as 13th bishop of the Diocese of Rhode Island.Knisely, 52, succeeds the Rt. Rev. Geralyn Wolf, who has served as Rhode Island’s 12th bishop since February 1996.Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori served a chief consecrator during the ordination. At a clergy meeting the day before, Jefferts Schori applauded Wolf as well as the Rhode Island search and transition committees, “thanking them for walking the diocese through such a healthy transition,” reported an article on the diocesan website. She told clergy, “where there is health there is promise, and this is a promising new era to begin together.”The Rt. Rev. Kirk Smith, bishop of Arizona where Knisely previously served as dean of Trinity Episcopal Cathedral in Phoenix, preached the ordination sermon. Smith congratulated Rhode Island for electing a “digital bishop” who knows how to speak the language of the 21st century and engage youth.Knisely was the first chair of the Episcopal Church’s Standing Commission on Communications and has served on various national and international bodies in that field. He maintains a personal blog called “Entangled States.”Smith’s sermon began with an unusual request – for all to pull out their cell phones and turn them on. The sermon ended with a similar exhortation – take that phone and tweet or post or check in online to let friends and family see faith in action.A reception followed the service. Afterward, the ordination’s fall cornucopia decor was scheduled to be donated to local Rhode Island food banks.Knisely was elected on the first ballot out of a slate of five nominees at the diocese’s annual convention in June.Knisely has been dean of the Phoenix cathedral since 2006. Before that call, he was rector of St. Trinity Episcopal Church in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, and St. Barnabas Episcopal Church in Brackinridge, Pennsylvania. He was curate at another St. Barnabas Church, this one in Wilmington, Delaware. He holds degrees in physics and astronomy from Franklin and Marshall College in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, and the University of Delaware and a master of divinity degree from the Berkeley Divinity School at Yale in New Haven, Connecticut.He was ordained to the diaconate in 1991 and to the priesthood in 1992. Knisely is married to Karen, and they have one daughter.The Diocese of Rhode Island includes 53 congregations, of which 43 are parishes, with 20,469 members and an average Sunday attendance of 5,601. Rector Hopkinsville, KY Associate Rector Columbus, GA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC center_img Featured Jobs & Calls Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR People Rector Tampa, FL December 2, 2012 at 11:33 am The new Bishop has many challenges ahead of him, first among them, reopening the Cathedral, and second, getting a couple of parishes into line on the priesting of women – St. John the Evangelist in Newport is the worst offender followed by St. Stephen’s in Providence. Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Comments (3) Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Curate Diocese of Nebraska Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Comments are closed. Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Press Release Service Rector Shreveport, LA November 19, 2012 at 12:55 pm Marvelous! Another scientist serving God in a very special way. Indeed, I feel hope and promise in the wisdom in this selection for Rhode Island. Rector Washington, DC This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Albany, NY Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Smithfield, NC Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Director of Music Morristown, NJ Youth Minister Lorton, VA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Bath, NC Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Submit an Event Listinglast_img read more

New Jersey church offers ‘flash mob’-style Worship Without Walls

first_img TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector Albany, NY Comments (13) Director of Music Morristown, NJ Submit a Press Release Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY The Rev. Alice Roberts says: August 7, 2013 at 11:51 am I have been holding an outdoor service on the Common across the road from the church every summer Sunday at 8am. I call it ‘Commonchurch’. Word of mouth has gone around and the attendance includes people from all over town including dogs. It is relaxed and friendly. The sermon is a discussion of the appointed Gospel. Many have said they would like to find a way to continue, but in New Hampshire it would have to be inside. We sing, pray and have communion. August 6, 2013 at 12:19 pm So enjoyed John at the baptism of Ellis Blue and little Michael, and thought that John’s message about “be not afraid”, and his progressive ideas about outdoor church were very inspiring. If I didn’t live 3,000 miles away, I’d be there! Think that Montclair has a treasure in John! August 5, 2013 at 11:47 pm It gave me a lot of joy to read this story and learn that Saint Luke’s is doing so well. Bless you. An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET August 6, 2013 at 1:23 am This is the vibrant future of God’s church. As good Pope Francis put it in Rio, “we cannot keep ourselves shut up in parishes, in our communities, when so many people are waiting for the Gospel. It is not enough simply to open the door in welcome, but we must go out through that door and be there, farthest away, with those who do not usually go to church. They too are invited to the table of the Lord.”Insisting that “no one can remain insensitive to the inequalities that persist in the world,” we are called, he said, “to have the courage to go against the tide…to keep alive [our] sensitivity to injustice”…and to foster a “culture of solidarity” to replace the “selfishness and individualism” of modern society. And these cannot remain just mere words. They must be the stuff of our deeds. Like the “Slum Pope,” we must go to the slums, the prisons, the schools, the hospitals, the retirement homes…and city hall, to encounter the world, to comfort and to challenge. In San Francisco, we are doing that in the city’s Tenderloin neighborhood where UCC, Lutheran, and Episcopal ministers of the San Francisco Night Ministry have been providing Sunday Eucharist for the last five years to a regular congregation of about fifty at our outdoor Open Cathedral and providing lunch to about a hundred. We are there every Sunday rain or shine and so are the faithful. For the past two years, we have been providing a similar service in the city’s largely Hispanic Mission District on Thursdays. We have witnessed lives being turned around and have , baptized several new Christians, performed three weddings…and one funeral. And we have walked with many through their time of trial with drugs, alcohol, mental illness, homelessness, and rejection by families and “respectable” walled churches.You can learn more about the San Francisco Night Ministry, which will celebrate its 50th year next year, and its Open Cathedral at http://www.sfnightministry.org/. You can also learn about Boston’s Common Cathedral and Ecclesia Ministries at http://www.ecclesia-ministries.org/. Montclair’s Worship Without Walls is a welcome addition to the growing Ecclesia movement. We wish it well. Again, it is the future of the church. Rector Smithfield, NC By Sharon SheridanPosted Aug 5, 2013 In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Laurie Charkins says: Julian Malakar says: Melanie Barbarito says: August 6, 2013 at 2:25 pm I love this!!! Great idea, John. But in Fort Worth, I think that summer’s probably not the time to do it. When it’s 105 degrees at 5 p.m., everyone is looking for an air conditioned place. If, by chance, Mitch Goodrich reads this far . . . so good to read about your coming upon John’s service. Hope you are doing well. Mother Melanie (once on staff at Church of the Redeemer in Cincinnati) Thomas Squiers says: August 6, 2013 at 5:17 pm I need to correct myself – it was my God-grandon Stephen Blue’s baptism, not myGod-grandson Ellis’ – If you could correct my comment and change it to Stephen I would be very grateful! Thank you! The Rev. John Mennell speaks to worshipers July 28 at the corner of Church Street and South Fullerton in Montclair, New Jersey, during Worship Without Walls. Photo:Sharon Sheridan/Episcopal News Service[Episcopal News Service] Wearing a traditional black clerical shirt and collar, and less- traditional black shorts and sandals, the Rev. John Mennell sits near a portable altar, waiting for stragglers. About a dozen people — one with a leashed dog named Gideon at her feet — sit facing him in two rows of folding chairs. Backed by the sounds of diners chatting outside a nearby eatery and passing vehicular traffic, Mennell rises and greets worshipers at the corner of Church Street and South Fullerton in Montclair, New Jersey, to the July 28 Worship Without Walls.From the weekends of Memorial Day through Labor Day, St. Luke’s Episcopal Church in Montclair is holding 5:00 p.m. Sunday Eucharists in public, outdoor spaces.  Similar to “flash mobs,” participants are alerted to the location each week via text message. Passersby are encouraged to join.“It’s fun to see different people’s reactions,” said Mennell, the church’s rector. “Last week, we ended up in the park in a walkway. … This one woman walked through with her dog, and her dog desperately wanted to join in the service.”When the woman walked through a second time, Mennell invited her to join them. “She politely informed me how the dog leads her to the temple each Saturday.”Such invitations, accepted or not, are among the points of Worship Without Walls, Mennell said. “Part of it is getting people used to inviting people in in ways that are uncomfortable.”“In our beautiful Episcopal reticence,” he said, churchgoers don’t stand on street corners talking about Jesus. “This is about as close as people comfortably get.”“If I told my congregation, ‘Go out on a street corner and witness,’ they’d run me out on a rail,” he said. But worshiping together publicly, “it’s really doing the same thing.”On this particular Sunday, nearly 20 people ultimately joined the service, with a few passersby stopping briefly to check things out.“As people come by and look curious, invite them into what we’re doing,” Mennell instructed the congregation. “We will sort of go with the flow.”Mitch Goodrich was running an errand in town when he stopped and joined the service with his sons Henry, 8, and Calvin, 19 months. Turns out, he knew Mennell years ago at Church of the Redeemer in Cincinnati, before the Montclair priest attended seminary.“This is fantastic. It’s so good to get out and let people see what’s going on and see who you are,” Goodrich said. “We need to do more of this in the Episcopal Church.”One man in a baseball cap interjected comments several times during the service. Listening to the Old Testament reading on Abraham bargaining with God about the fate of Sodom, he announced: “We’re doomed.”“No we’re not,” Mennell reassured him. “We’re saved.”Later, during the sermon, the priest asked the congregation what stopped them from praying.One woman replied that her concerns are “too small and insignificant.”“Alcohol and chicks,” said the man in the cap.“Different addictions often stand in our way,” Mennell replied.“Guilt,” said another congregant.“Satan,” added the man in the cap.“Jesus has power over Satan,” said Mennell, spurring a brief dialogue over this theological point.Such engagement, if sometimes challenging, is not unwelcomed.“Part of breaking down walls [is] we can’t use the walls of the church as a barrier to keep people out and keep ideas out,” Mennell said later.For the first time that summer, weather interrupted the service. With the onset of a rainstorm, the worshipers brought the prayers of the people to a speedy conclusion. Then about half of them headed to a nearby diner to conclude the service and eat together. They ordered food, then completed the Eucharist.Worship Without Walls recently prayed near the intersection of Bloomfield and Mission Streets, the scene of two Montclair shootings. Photo: St. Luke’s, Montclair.At the peace, besides greeting each other, they followed an extra ritual: pulling out their cell phones and texting “Peace be with you” to someone. The offering, as always, went to a local organization, this time Montclair Conversations on Race. Another week, the congregation worshiped near where two shootings had occurred. Worshipers prayed for an end to gun violence and designated the collection to CeasefireNJ, an anti-gun effort.Often the group will follow worship with a meal, Mennell said. “It’s a fun way to continue the fellowship.”That night’s dinner conversation ranged from an explanation of what “catholic” means to the spiritual journeys of young people. St. Luke’s member Michelle Cruz, a recent college graduate, discussed how what she had learned through science confirmed her faith. “It is so complicated,” she said. “I don’t think it could have come up by itself.”Attending her first Worship Without Walls with her father, Felix, she said she appreciated being outside.“Texting’s cool,” she added. “I texted one of my sorority sisters. She’s a Silesian Catholic.”Elsie Lockett also attended for the first time. “I like it. It’s different, and it makes it less structured,” she said.The Rev. Joseph Harmon, rector of Christ Episcopal Church in East Orange, attended the July 28 service with an eye toward starting a similar ministry with his congregation. “We’ve been discussing how Christ Church can become a more missional church and in particular how we can engage the East Orange community more effectively,” he said.Len Roberts, a regular Worship Without Walls participant, said he thought that’s just what St. Luke’s was doing in Montclair. Taking the Eucharist out into the community lets people know that the power of Christ is in the community, “not just in church,” he said.St. Luke’s is one of multiple Episcopal churches within several miles and is reaching out to some of them to join in a nearby Worship Without Walls. Worshipers from Christ Church, a mile and a half away in Bloomfield and Glen Ridge, joined St. Luke’s for one service.“One of the points is breaking down all of these different barriers that we have as we come together in Jesus’ name, and it was really fun to come together with another Episcopal community,” Mennell said. “We sang the same songs and said the same words. There’s no service leaflet to this. It’s a really powerful thing to see what we all know and do and share together, almost as powerful as inviting people into what we’re doing.”“What I would love this to become is a different model of doing church,” Mennell said. “We’ve got the best thing in the world to offer. We need to get better at giving it away.”To sign up to receive a text message with the location of upcoming Worship Without Walls services, text “stlukesmtc” to 41411.— Sharon Sheridan is an ENS correspondent. Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Sheri Simpson says: Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR August 8, 2013 at 11:46 am Wonderful idea!! We are the area of the “church of none” (Pacific Northwest) and we all say that nature is our church. No walls–doesn’t scare anyone. Good Job! Katerina Whitley says: Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Laurie Charkins says: Rector Washington, DC Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem August 6, 2013 at 10:15 am Wow! What a wonderful way to bring the Gospel to the people. I like this idea. I will certainly pass this on to my Priest. Keep up the good work, St. Luke’s. May you keep bringing the Gospel to the people. Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Pittsburgh, PA August 5, 2013 at 8:42 pm Meeting people where they are is the key, and St. Luke’s is doing just that..wonderful !! Dana Downes says: This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rev. Vicki Gray says: Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ center_img Featured Events August 8, 2013 at 1:04 pm God is everywhere, whether outside or inside of walls. God cares about our repented heart which is inside; trust and believe of Christ’s sacrificial death on cross for my sins, as free gift for my salvation. New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Karen Birr says: Featured Jobs & Calls New Jersey church offers ‘flash mob’-style Worship Without Walls Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Bath, NC Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Submit a Job Listing Albert Westpy says: Associate Rector Columbus, GA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Press Release Service Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Comments are closed. Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Lorraine Connor says: Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Youth Minister Lorton, VA Submit an Event Listing The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Tampa, FL Rector Hopkinsville, KY Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Belleville, IL August 5, 2013 at 9:02 pm I love this idea. I would love for us to be able to do something like that here in the Diocese of Fort Worth! Rector Knoxville, TN Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Martinsville, VA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC August 17, 2013 at 9:39 am I am sure St Paul would approve. Every ekklesia he founded must have started in the street or the square. Wonderful evangelion! Rector Collierville, TN Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs August 6, 2013 at 10:32 am This is wonderful. I’m going to share this with our Bishop Rector Shreveport, LA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET last_img read more