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Delight as Cloughaneely Language Forum hold first ever meeting – Pic Special

first_imgOver 100 members of the community attended the first ever meeting of the Cloughaneely Language Planning Forum Halla Fionnáin, Falcarragh on Tuesday last.The forum has being established to help the language planning committee in their efforts to implement the local Irish-language plan.Under the direction of the facilitator, Páraic Mac Donncha, the forum made a number of key decisions as regards the direction the language planning process and it is hoped to put implement the recommendations made at the meeting over the next year. Representatives from many of the area’s community and voluntary groups, organisations sports clubs and businesses attended the forum.There was robust debate and many innovative opinions and recommendations were put forward.Among the actions decided on at the meeting was the implementation of a signage system in local businesses so as customers and visitors know where services in Irish are available.The creation of a forum for young people was also discussed, where they can decide on what social activities should be provided for them in Irish, and the creation of parent and toddlers groups in Irish. Committee members hard at work at the inaugral meeting of the Cloughaneeely Language Planning Forum in Falcarragh on Tuesday night last. Photo Clive WassonAoife Nic an Iomaire taking notes at the inaugral meeting of the Cloughaneeely Language Planning Forum in Falcarragh on Tuesday night last. Photo Clive WassonTom Feeney, Eddie Curran and John Fitzgerald at the inaugral meeting of the Cloughaneeely Language Planning Forum in Falcarragh on Tuesday night last. Photo Clive WassonMicheal Mac Aoidh, Paraic Mac Donncha and Bearnai O Gallchoir at the inaugral meeting of the Cloughaneeely Language Planning Forum in Falcarragh on Tuesday night last. Photo Clive WassonThe packed hall at the inaugral meeting of the Cloughaneeely Language Planning Forum in Falcarragh on Tuesday night last. Photo Clive WassonCommittee members, Máire Nic Fhearraigh, Máire Ni Bhaoil, Mary Cassidy, Caitlin Uí Lafferty and Mary Nic Phadein at the inaugral meeting of the Cloughaneeely Language Planning Forum in Falcarragh on Tuesday night last. Photo Clive WassonPáraic Mac Donncha, The Facilitator at the inaugral meeting of the Cloughaneeely Language Planning Forum in Falcarragh on Tuesday night last. Photo Clive WassonCarmeal and Eibhlín Curran at the inaugral meeting of the Cloughaneeely Language Planning Forum in Falcarragh on Tuesday night last. Photo Clive WassonCaitríona Ní Cheallaigh at the inaugral meeting of the Cloughaneeely Language Planning Forum in Falcarragh on Tuesday night last. Photo Clive WassonBearnaí Ó Gallchóir, Chairperson of Cloughaneely Language Planning at the inaugral meeting of the Cloughaneeely Language Planning Forum in Falcarragh on Tuesday night last. Photo Clive WassonPaul Bonnar and Manus Ó Ceallaigh in discussion at the inaugral meeting of the Cloughaneeely Language Planning Forum in Falcarragh on Tuesday night last. Photo Clive WassonTommy Francis speaking at the event at the inaugral meeting of the Cloughaneeely Language Planning Forum in Falcarragh on Tuesday night last. Photo Clive WassonMicheal Mac Aoidh, the Language planning officer for Cloughaneely at the inaugral meeting of the Cloughaneeely Language Planning Forum in Falcarragh on Tuesday night last. Photo Clive WassonThe Facilitator, Páraic Mac Donncha who oversaw the event at the inaugral meeting of the Cloughaneeely Language Planning Forum in Falcarragh on Tuesday night last. Photo Clive Wasson Delight as Cloughaneely Language Forum hold first ever meeting – Pic Special was last modified: March 2nd, 2019 by Shaun KeenanShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:CloughaneelyCloughaneely Language Planning Forumlast_img read more

South African shopping mall development shows strong growth

first_img17 October 2014 The new Mall of Africa is set to change the face of Johannesburg. (Photo: Atterbury) Despite the sluggish economic growth in South Africa, new shopping malls are rising in many parts of the country, with the latest addition being Newtown Junction in Johannesburg.The growth of shopping centres is on the upsurge and current figures show that there are 1 785 malls in South Africa, with 44% of the shopping centre space being in Gauteng, reports the Mail & Guardian.Located in the Newtown precinct (where the Market Theatre is located) the R1.4- billion Newtown Junction opened on 25 September and boasts 82 000m² of retail space. The mall was six years in the making and aims to play a major role in the rejuvenation of inner-city Johannesburg.The mall is targeted at the lower income groups and features retailers like Truworths, Foschini, Jet and Mr Price, and a Pick n Pay. It is expected that the mixed use character of the mall, which includes 39 000m² of office space, will later attract people in the higher income groups.Growth of South African mallsA report by Dirk Prinsloo, the managing director of Urban Studies, which conducts feasibility studies for shopping centres, shows that the number of malls in South Africa is far higher than its emerging market peers, some of which have four times its population, and even outdoes that of some developed economies. The report, Benchmarking the South African Shopping Centre Industry: International and Local Trends, was commissioned by the South African Council of Shopping Centres in 2013 reveals the following:In Brazil, with a population of 200-million, the number of shopping centres is near the 400 mark and, in Mexico (population 122-million), it is closer to 500.Portugal (population 10.5-million), New Zealand (population 4.5-million) and Argentina (population 41.5-million) have fewer than 200 centres each.Germany (population 80-million) has 600 and Australia (population 23-million) come closest to South Africa (population 54-million) by having slightly more than 1? 400 shopping centres.South Africa has about one million square metres of shopping centre space currently under planning. On the rest of the continent it is 900 000m².Prinsloo’s research shows that, last year, shopping centre sales per capita in South Africa amounted to R8 900 (up from R5 255 in 2007) with sales amounting to R392-billion (up from R245-billion in 2007).According to Statistics South Africa, total retail trade sales last year amounted to almost R698-billion, compared with R577-billion in 2008.The South African retail space market is so developed that, according to an AT Kearney 2012 Global Retail Development Index, it can no longer be listed as one of “the 30 developing countries’ – the report concluded that the window of growth had closed.Mall development continues to riseConcerns about shopping centre space reaching saturation have abounded for decades but the growth continues.“We are seeing more and more shopping centres in rural areas and towns – and in Johannesburg it is not stopping,’ said Elaine Wilson, the divisional director of research at the commercial property management company Broll.Urban Studies is conducting new feasibility studies on shopping centres. “We are busy here and that is indicating two things,’ Prinsloo said. “People are dusting off old plans that were put on the shelves in 2008 when the recession started . and there are other new opportunities where people move into the rural areas.’The driver of retail space growth, experts agree, is the emerging middle class and urbanisation.Growth in urbanisationAccording to his research, South Africa is experiencing “unprecedented growth in urbanisation’, and is now 63% urbanised. That is expected to reach 68% by 2030, warranting up to two million square metres of additional retail floor space by 2025.“As far as your convenience and neighbourhood centres are concerned, in some areas there is a certain level of saturation,’ Prinsloo said. “But where you see most of your growth is in your regional centres and super-regional centres.’Liberty Properties manages a handful of major malls, including Eastgate in Johannesburg, the Midlands Mall in KwaZulu-Natal, the Promenade in Cape Town and one of the largest shopping centres on the continent, Sandton City.Liberty Properties managing director, Maurice Mdlolo, said: “Most international retailers who want to come to the continent have identified South Africa as the gateway and Sandton as the first port of call.“There is growth which is happening. In our observation, this growth is very much driven by the retailers. It’s very much a retailers’ market at the moment and they can dictate better rentals and expand into some of the spaces,’ said Mdlolo.New Mall of Africa MallMall development in Johannesburg continues. Property development company Atterbury is currently developing a 120 000m² Mall of Africa for R3.5 billion – South Africa’s largest single-phase shopping mall development to date – financed by Nedbank Corporate Property Finance. The new super-regional Mall of Africa will be the heart of the ambitious Waterfall, a city superbly situated between Johannesburg and Pretoria.The two-level mall forms the hub of Waterfall Business Estate, a 1.6 million square metre mixed-use commercial development. Commercial property commentators punt the development as the most ambitious commercial development yet undertaken in southern Africa.SAinfo reporterlast_img read more

Ten tips for newbies looking for their first geocache

first_imgSo you’ve heard about this “geocaching” thing for a while now, and you’ve finally signed up on Geocaching.com or through the Geocaching® app. You’ve done a search, selected a great cache to find, and now you’re within 30 feet of the cache. So, now what?Here are ten tips for newbies looking for their first geocache.1. Use your eyes, hands, and geo-sensesUse your eyes, hands, and geo-senses. Your GPS or smartphone will only get you within about 30 feet of the cache location. When you’re close, use your eyes, hands, and geo-senses to locate the cache.2. Look for something that seems out of placeLook for something that seems out of place. Cache containers come in all sizes, shapes, colors. Look in tree hollows, under park benches, inspect that oyster shell in the forest, and yes, look in that one spot you’re 100% positive is not the hiding place. Chances are, that’s exactly where the cache is.3. Geocaches are often disguisedGeocaches are often disguised as rocks, bricks, bird houses, or other everyday objects, so think outside the (ahem), cache-box.4. Think like a detectiveThink like a detective, “If I were a geocache, where would I hide?”5. Geocaches should never be buriedGeocaches should never be buried, but they won’t always be on the ground.6. Look high, look low, look aroundLook high, look low, look around. Leave no bench unsearched, no stone unturned.7. Respect your surroundingsRespect your surroundings. NEVER trample on flower beds, scale walls, or damage property trying to find the cache.8. Check the hintCheck the hint. Many cache pages offer hints that may help you figure out where to look.9. Check the latest activityCheck the latest activity. Recent logs from other geocachers may contain valuable information such as, “I had to lean ON THE FENCE to find this one!”10. Be patientBe patient. Developing your geo-senses takes time.One last tip: Always, always ALWAYS bring a pen!Remember every single geocacher started out as a brand new geocacher and had to learn the ropes. And just like getting to Carnegie Hall, geocaching takes practice, practice, practice. Share with your Friends:More SharePrint RelatedThe evolution of geocachesNovember 19, 2019In “Learn”From flying planes to finding caches — Interview with cache owner CliptwingsJuly 12, 2019In “Interview”Five ways to mentor a new geocacherMarch 7, 2016In “Community”last_img read more

Lawn Mowing Season

first_img RELATED ARTICLES GBA Encyclopedia: Green LandscapesProtect and Restore the SiteIn Defense of the Lawn I’ve never liked mowing the lawn. And it’s not just because of the gasoline used in the process.Lawns carry huge environmental burdens in this country, and we have a lot of them. I profiled some of these impacts once for an article in Environmental Building News back in the 1990s. From the information I found then, the total lawn area in the U.S. is 50,000 square miles — an area larger than the state of New York. We spend $25 billion per year on their care. We dump 3-6 million tons of fertilizer on them, and the runoff from those lawns is one of the largest pollution problems in our lakes and rivers.We apply something like 34,000 tons of herbicides, insecticides, fungicides, and other pesticides on them, accounting for a whopping 14% of total pesticide use in the U.S. — and 34% of insecticide use. On a per-acre basis, this amounts to about two pounds per year.And while not as big an issue in Vermont as elsewhere, we use a huge amount of water maintaining our emerald-green oases. “Kentucky” bluegrass is not from Kentucky (it’s from Europe), and it takes about 40 inches of water per year to keep it that lush green we’ve come to know and love. In much of the country, irrigating lawns is the single largest consumptive use of water (we use a lot more water in cooling thermo-electric power plants, but most of that water is only “borrowed” for power generation, then returned to the source), often accounting for 40-60% of total municipal water use. And then there’s the energy. Our fleet of 40 million lawn mowers consume several hundred million gallons of gasoline each year. And despite improvements in recent years, lawnmower engines aren’t as clean as car engines. While our mowers consume just a tiny percent of the gasoline used by our automobile fleet, they emit as must as 7% of VOCs (volatile organic compounds) in some areas. My own predicamentLiving in West Dummerston, Vermont, six miles outside of Brattleboro, I’ve tried to shrink our lawn area to minimize the need for mowing, and ten years ago we went out on a limb and bought a then-pretty-new battery-powered electric lawn mower. It’s a Makita mower — you-know (well, some of you guys know), that tool maker of the famed Miss Makita calendars.I’m pretty sure that Makita no longer makes an electric lawn mower, and ours never worked all that well. But our lawn area was small enough that the mower (mostly) did the job. In the last five years, as the rechargeable lead-acid batteries gradually failed, it got harder and harder to mow the entire lawn on one charge. We looked into replacing the batteries, but they were going to cost something like $250 — for a mower with all sorts of other stuff wrong with it that had probably cost about $400 when new. I just couldn’t bring myself to spend the money for new batteries.This year the batteries finally stopped charging altogether. What would we do about it?Being a product researcher (it’s an affliction that gobbles up hours but at least finds a useful outlet in our company’s green products directory, GreenSpec) I spent a while learning how far the industry had come in ten years. I still liked the idea of mowing our lawn using electricity — opening up the potential for generating our own power for that task) — but surely the industry had moved beyond our Makita-blue mower (that had lost its slick plastic cover when I removed it one time to see about replacing the batteries and lost the screws).Consumer Reports likes the Black and Decker 19-inch 36-volt mowers (either self-propelled or push-type). But neither Consumer Reports nor the local dealer in Brattleboro likes these mowers as much as gasoline-powered models. They aren’t stocked locally, so I’d have to special-order one. (If only more homeowners pushed for lower-impact products!)We may order one of these, but I’m also watching the technologies. Power tools are converting to more environmentally friendly lithium-ion battery technology in place of nickel-cadmium or sealed lead-acid batteries (the latter being what is used in the Black and Decker mowers). Do I really want to go out and buy a mower (for about $450) with lead-acid batteries and then see the newer technology come along as soon as I’ve bought it? (I have an inquiry into Black and Decker to try to find out if the company’s battery technology will be changing soon.)Meanwhile, my decision-making in the lawn-mowing department got more complicated by our purchase of a farm last fall. All of a sudden we have a much larger lawn to deal with — at least until we succeed in shrinking that lawn area. We’re now at the scale of lawn where a push mower may not be large enough. So far, we’ve been borrowing a generous neighbor’s riding lawn mower, but are less than enthusiastic about purchasing a new riding lawnmower that’s gasoline-powered.center_img Electric riding mowers?What’s the status of riding mowers with battery-powered electric motors? It turns out that there are some. But they’re quite pricey! The company Driven by Solar, Inc. makes the ReCharge Mower G2, a riding mower powered by a 36-volt, 85-amp-hour battery system. The mower has two cutting blades with a 30-inch width and seven cutting heights. The blades spin at 3,600 rpm, which is pretty standard for gasoline-powered riding mowers. The manufacturer’s suggested list price (MSRP) of this made-in-America mower is $2,599.Hustler makes the Zeon zero-turn commercial riding mower with a two-blade, 42-inch deck. The mower weighs in at a hefty 814 pounds with a roll-over protection system (ROPS) installed. The website claims the Zeon can mow a full acre on a single charge. It looks like a great machine, but carries a MSRP of $6,999, with a special Web price of $4,999 — out of our range.And at the top end of the (limited) scale of commercial electric riding mowers seems to be Mean Green Products, LLC. The company’s 36-volt RX-50 riding mower has a 50-inch deck and enough battery capacity to mow about two acres, according to the company. It weighs an even more prodigious 890 pounds, and the price is $9,900. Way out of our price range!These zero-emission, rechargeable electric riding mowers sound pretty good, but you can buy a decent gasoline-powered riding mower for half the price of the cheapest of these.I’d like to use an electric mower and charge it with my own photovoltaic power system, but the cost is just too high, and all of these models currently use lead-acid batteries, which may soon be obsolete and more manufacturers switch to lithium-ion batteries.I’m thinking the answer is to find a decent used riding mower on Craigslist and use it until a battery-powered electric model is affordable. By then I should have a PV system up and running.Or maybe I should buy some goats…. Alex is founder of BuildingGreen, Inc. and executive editor of Environmental Building News. He also coauthored BuildingGreen’s special report on windows that just came out. To keep up with Alex’s latest articles and musings, you can sign up for his Twitter feed.last_img read more

Shah urged to ensure justice for Sanaullah

first_imgCongress MP Gaurav Gogoi has urged Union Home Minister Amit Shah to ensure “justice” to Kargil war veteran Mohammad Sanaullah, who has been recently declared a ‘foreigner’ and sent to a detention camp. Mr. Gogoi, in his letter to Mr. Shah, made available to the media on Thursday, urged him to institute an inquiry into the alleged inefficiency of police officers who verified his documents and the subsequent declaration of the former Army personnel as ‘foreigner’ by the Foreigners’ Tribunal at Boko. The Congress MP, elected to the Lok Sabha for the second consecutive term from Kaliabor, demanded that the erring officials be barred from continuing their duty in such “irresponsible manner”. People of Assam are pinning hopes on the central government for justice, he insisted. “Sanaullah’s long service in the armed forces is proof of his patriotism and citizenship and we sincerely want relief for the veteran aAmyman,” the MP added. A resident Kolohikash village in Boko area of Kamrup district, Mr. Sanaullah was serving as a sub-inspector in the Assam Border Police before being declared a “foreigner” on May 23 and dismissed from service.Decorated ArmymanEarlier, he had also served in the Electronic and Mechanical Services of the armed forces and was awarded the President’s Medal in 2014. He is currently lodged at a detention centre at Goalpara district in the State.last_img read more