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Big Pickup for Salvation Army Thanks to Donation by FortisTCI

first_img FortisTCI reveals Education Week winners Recommended for you Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp TCI Police looking for candy & electricity thieves Rave Reviews for National Science Fair ideas Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppProvidenciales, Turks and Caicos Islands (November, 11 2014 / Fortis TCI Press Release) – The Salvation Army recently received a helpful donation in the form of a pickup truck donated to them by FortisTCI. The truck, once a part of the FortisTCI fleet, will aid the Salvation Army in taking care of their day-to-day tasks which typically involves moving large amounts of donated goods.FortisTCI Vice President of Transmission and Distribution Devon Cox and Vice President of Customer & Corporate Services Allan Robinson made the hand-off. Mr. Cox commented on the donation adding, “We enjoy giving back to the community and embrace the work of organizations such as the Salvation Army. We know that they will take this donation and do even more amazing work throughout the islands.”The gold 2009 Ford F-150 was turned over in excellent used condition to Captain Derick Miller. He plans to use the truck for transporting goods, emergency items and food, as well as picking up donations and transporting Salvation Army workers and volunteers to various events. Speaking about the donation, Capt. Miller said, “It’s through donations like these that the Salvation Army can continue to do the work it does in aiding the community. We appreciate the assistance that FortisTCI has given us, and we’re glad to have their partnership in this regard.”As a part of the Company’s mission, FortisTCI believes in being a good corporate citizen. FortisTCI, therefore, looks forward to making meaningful contributions that have a positive impact on the community.-###-Notes to Editors:1) FortisTCI Limited (FTCI) became a wholly owned subsidiary of Fortis Inc. located inNewfoundland, Canada in August 2006. Turks and Caicos Utility Limited (TCU), which is thesole provider of electricity on the Islands of Grand Turk and Salt Cay, was acquired by FTCI inAugust 2012. FTCI is the sole provider of electricity in Providenciales, North Caicos, MiddleCaicos, East Caicos and adjacent Cays, and South Caicos. Together the two companies serveapproximately 13,000 electricity customers in the Turks & Caicos Islands. The Utilities have anaggregate diesel-fired generating capacity of approximately 75 megawatts. Additionalinformation on FortisTCI can be accessed at www.fortistci.com.2) Fortis is the largest investor-owned distribution utility in Canada, with total assetsapproaching $25 billion and fiscal 2013 revenue exceeding $4 billion. Its regulated utilitiesaccount for approximately 93% of total assets and serve more than 3 million customers acrossCanada and in the United States and the Caribbean. Fortis owns non-regulated hydroelectricgeneration assets in Canada, Belize and Upstate New York. The Corporation’s non-utilityinvestment is comprised of hotels and commercial real estate in Canada. For more information,visit www.fortisinc.com or www.sedar.com.CONTACT:Allan RobinsonVP, Customer & Corporate ServicesFortisTCI LtdTel: 649-946-4313Email: arobinson@fortistci.com Related Items:allan robinson, Captain Derick Miller, Devon Cox, donation, fortis tci, salvation armylast_img read more

Very Few Bright Lights in BtoB in 08

first_imgCHICAGO—John Suhler, president and founding general partner of Veronis Suhler Stevenson,began his luncheon keynote on day two of American Business Media’s Top Management meeting here by saying that all feedback he’s received about the current state of the industry has been “suck, suck, suck!” He said that all ABM attendees “should feel in good company—there are very few bright lights in this environment,” a statement that drew both laughter and positive acknowledgement.Despite his description, Suhler was still able to provideanalysis on how to leverage brand equity based on media’s past thirty years.“Media spend has outgrown GDP by a couple of hundred basis points,” he said. “Solong term, generally broad-base media spend is outpacing economic growthconsistently over the many recessions and resets that we’ve had.” Suhler briefly discussed VSS’ b-to-b media investments (VSSis an investor in FOLIO: parent company Red 7 Media) and gave ABM members aquick look at a select section of its portfolio, suggesting that b-to-b mediacompanies bridge the growing gap through opportunities with targeted businessinformation services.Mark DiMassimo, CEO and creative director of DiMassimoGoldstein, talked about the industry from a marketing perspective. “As someonewho sells innovation and help clients face reality, I count on denial andunderestimation of change,” he said. “I expect most institutions that we workwith to get it wrong.” Of advertisers, he assured attendees, 64 percent continue toview business media as important. “User generated content is also important,especially in vertical markets,” he added, citing feedback from surveyed advertisers.During Tuesday’s first session, IDG CEO Bob Carriganintroduced Booz & Company panelists to speak about the results of Booz& Company’s survey, “A Roadmap for Profitable Growth.” Booz partners HarryHawkes Jr. and Matt Egol discussed how b-to-b and information companies aretransforming their capabilities to drive profitable growth, citing twopredominant paths that business media companies can take: marketers and endusers. While many companies do one or the other well, the study confirmed thatfew, if any, are able to excel at both.last_img read more

CNET Book Club Blake Crouch messes with your memories in Recursion

first_img 0 Meet Blake Crouch. Sarah Tew/CNET Blake Crouch likes messing with your mind. Whether in the Wayward Pines trilogy (recently adapted as a TV series), Good Behavior (also a TV series), or the critical gem Dark Matter (in the works as a film), his characters encounter moral dilemmas, often with a sci-fi twist. Recursion, his latest novel, takes things deeper, mixing elements of a police procedural with time travel, alternative universes and just a bit of mad scientist menace. Naturally, it’s already being developed by Shona Rhimes for Netflix.My colleague David Carnoy, author of several mystery novels, joins in for this episode of Book Club, while Scott was out of town. Subscribe: CNET RSS | iTunes | FeedBurner | Google Play | TuneIn | Stitcher  See Recursion at Amazonrecursion Random House About CNET Book ClubThe Book Club is hosted by a pair of self-proclaimed book experts: Dan Ackerman (author of the nonfiction video game history book The Tetris Effect), and Scott Stein, a playwright and screenwriter. We’ll be announcing our next Book Club selection soon, so send us your suggestions and keep an eye out for updates on Twitter at @danackerman and @jetscott. Previous episodesBorne by Jeff VanderMeerWalkaway by Cory DoctorowArtemis by Andy WeirDown the River Unto the Sea by Walter MosleyTen Arguments for Deleting Your Social Media Accounts Right Now by Jaron LanierCNET Book Club: Holiday 2018 gift guide specialTeam Human by Douglas RushkoffJosh Frank on bringing the Marx Brothers and Salvador Dalí togetherTim Maughan asks, what if the internet dies?Subscribe to CNET Book Club: CNET RSS | iTunes | FeedBurner | Google Play | TuneIn | Stitcher Tags Share your voice CNET Book Club Culture Post a commentlast_img read more

Nicaraguas fresh violence kills six including American

first_imgDemonstrators clash with riot police during a protest against Nicaragua`s President Daniel Ortega`s government in Masaya, Nicaragua on 2 June. ReutersNicaraguan protesters fired homemade mortars to fend off a police crackdown Saturday in new unrest that left at least six people dead, including a US citizen, as the opposition renewed calls for President Daniel Ortega’s resignation.But Ortega, the man who has dominated the Central American country’s politics for the past four decades, only appeared to dig in deeper, defying seven weeks of anti-government protests that have left more than 100 people dead and are turning increasingly violent.In the city of Masaya, once a bastion of support for Ortega’s leftist Sandinista movement, residents put up barricades to keep out riot police and protect them from what they said were police and paramilitary snipers positioned around a central neighbourhood.Five people were killed in the city, including a 15-year-old boy, according to the Nicaraguan Association for the Protection of Human Rights (ANPDH).”The blood spilled in Masaya has made it a day of mourning and pain for those citizens who simply wanted to exercise their right to protest,” the head of the rights group, Alvaro Leiva, told AFP.”We are facing a situation of profound crisis in terms of human rights violations.”A police intelligence officer was also among the victims, he said.Separately, US Ambassador Laura Dogu said an American citizen had been killed overnight in the capital, Managua.The ANPDH identified him as Sixto Henry Viera, 48, and said he was reportedly killed by a pro-government mob.The police meanwhile reported looting, fires and riots in at least six cities, including Managua and Masaya, blaming “right-wing groups” — though in at least some of the cities, residents said the security forces themselves were responsible for the destruction.- Urban battleground -A masked demonstrator clashes with riot police during a protest against Nicaragua`s President Daniel Ortega`s government in Masaya, Nicaragua on 2 June. ReutersMasaya, a city of just over 100,000 people, resonated with gun and mortar fire as residents vowed to fight back the security forces they blame for killing innocent protesters, as well as government supporters they say have been looting and pillaging.Holed up in a police station and other strategic spots, police returned fire with tear gas and, allegedly, live ammunition.Jonhatan Jose, 47, said his neighbour was shot and killed.”They are attacking the Nicaraguan people. They put a bullet in my neighbour’s chest this morning,” he told AFP.”It was a sniper… You can tell by the size of the hole — big… He must have been about 23 years old, with a son who was three or four.”One focal point in the unrest was a burned-out artisans’ market.The government said residents had torched it, and that security forces were sent into the city at the request of small business owners who lost everything.Residents called that a lie; they said riot police burned the building themselves in an attempt to justify the crackdown, which led to 31 arrests.The street battles shut down any semblance of normal life in the city.As hundreds of youths gathered at the barricades brandishing homemade mortars, machetes, rocks and slingshots, other residents sheltered in their homes in terror.At her family-owned grocery store, 49-year-old Vanesa — who declined to give her last name, fearing for her safety — choked up as she described hiding out with her three children and grandson.”I’m hopeless, heartbroken, I don’t have words to describe it,” she said. “The situation is horrible. Horrible, horrible, horrible.”- Long fight -Protesters have a single demand, said Azhalea Solis, an opposition leader: “Get rid of Ortega’s government immediately.”But the 72-year-old president looks ready for a long fight.On Wednesday, a Mother’s Day march in support of mothers who have lost children in the violence was met with gunfire that left at least 16 people dead.Former Ortega ally Henry Ruiz — who was a commander in the Sandinista guerrilla army when it overthrew the dictator Anastasio Somoza in 1979, bringing Ortega to power — warned the country to brace for more.”There is abundant evidence that Ortega will dig in militarily to fight back and strengthen his hand for negotiations,” he said in an opinion column.Ortega, who was voted out of office in 1990 and returned to power in 2007, is now serving a third term that is due to end in 2022.last_img