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News of Steph Curry’s surgery greeted by shock, dismay, half-hearted jokes

first_imgFans, observers and the NBA community barely had time to digest the fact that Stephen Curry was going to miss playing time after suffering an injury to his left hand during a game against Phoenix on Wednesday night.On Friday came another bombshell. The Warriors announced that Curry had surgery to repair his left hand and will be reevaluated in three months. He could miss 45 games.Dr. Steven Shin — who performed surgery on Steph Curry’s left hand — also did procedure on Drew Brees’ broken …last_img read more

Wheat ahead of schedule

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest The calendar may say that this is just the first few days of spring, but some wheat crops aren’t paying attention to the dates on the page.In some areas in central Ohio, wheat is already at Feekes growth stage 5, which in a typical year doesn’t happen until early April, said Laura Lindsey, a soybean and small grains specialist with Ohio State University Extension.OSU Extension is the outreach arm of the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State University.The earlier growth stages for some Ohio winter wheat crops is thanks to the warm-up experienced in many areas of the state recently, Lindsey said.Ahead of schedule“Wheat growers can’t look to the calendar date this year to judge their crop’s growth stages simply because it’s been so warm recently,” she said. “We haven’t seen a year like this in recent times, so our recommendation is for growers to go out and check their wheat plants to judge their growth stages.“Wheat in some areas in central and south-central Ohio are already in Feekes growth stage 5, and some wheat crops in northwest Ohio are already at early green-up.” Lindsey said it is important for growers to track the growth stages of their wheat crops because management decisions are made based on the plant’s growth patterns.“Generally, Feekes growth stage 6 occurs in southern Ohio during early April,” she said.“However, with the abnormally warm temperatures, Feekes growth stage 6, which is also known as jointing, may occur weeks sooner. So it’s important that growers go out and stage the wheat now to understand where their crops are in their development to be able to make the right management choices.”Timing nitrogenOne of those management decisions is when to apply nitrogen to wheat, she said.“Wheat needs nitrogen at Feekes growth stage 6, which could be in about a week or two this year,” Lindsey said. “So, for some growers, now maybe the time to apply nitrogen.”To determine if wheat is in Feekes growth stage 6, growers can:• Dig up several clusters of tillers with roots and soil from multiple locations in the field.• Identify and select three to four primary tillers from each cluster – usually the largest tillers with the thickest stem.• Strip away and remove all the lower leaves, which are usually small and yellowish or dead leaves, exposing the base of the stem.• Look for the first node generally between 1 and 2 inches above the base of the stem. This node is usually seen as a slightly swollen area of a slightly different (darker) shade of green than the rest of the stem.A video on identifying Feekes growth stage 6 can also be viewed at youtube.com/watch?v=iukwznx4DPk.last_img read more

Lawn Mowing Season

first_img RELATED ARTICLES GBA Encyclopedia: Green LandscapesProtect and Restore the SiteIn Defense of the Lawn I’ve never liked mowing the lawn. And it’s not just because of the gasoline used in the process.Lawns carry huge environmental burdens in this country, and we have a lot of them. I profiled some of these impacts once for an article in Environmental Building News back in the 1990s. From the information I found then, the total lawn area in the U.S. is 50,000 square miles — an area larger than the state of New York. We spend $25 billion per year on their care. We dump 3-6 million tons of fertilizer on them, and the runoff from those lawns is one of the largest pollution problems in our lakes and rivers.We apply something like 34,000 tons of herbicides, insecticides, fungicides, and other pesticides on them, accounting for a whopping 14% of total pesticide use in the U.S. — and 34% of insecticide use. On a per-acre basis, this amounts to about two pounds per year.And while not as big an issue in Vermont as elsewhere, we use a huge amount of water maintaining our emerald-green oases. “Kentucky” bluegrass is not from Kentucky (it’s from Europe), and it takes about 40 inches of water per year to keep it that lush green we’ve come to know and love. In much of the country, irrigating lawns is the single largest consumptive use of water (we use a lot more water in cooling thermo-electric power plants, but most of that water is only “borrowed” for power generation, then returned to the source), often accounting for 40-60% of total municipal water use. And then there’s the energy. Our fleet of 40 million lawn mowers consume several hundred million gallons of gasoline each year. And despite improvements in recent years, lawnmower engines aren’t as clean as car engines. While our mowers consume just a tiny percent of the gasoline used by our automobile fleet, they emit as must as 7% of VOCs (volatile organic compounds) in some areas. My own predicamentLiving in West Dummerston, Vermont, six miles outside of Brattleboro, I’ve tried to shrink our lawn area to minimize the need for mowing, and ten years ago we went out on a limb and bought a then-pretty-new battery-powered electric lawn mower. It’s a Makita mower — you-know (well, some of you guys know), that tool maker of the famed Miss Makita calendars.I’m pretty sure that Makita no longer makes an electric lawn mower, and ours never worked all that well. But our lawn area was small enough that the mower (mostly) did the job. In the last five years, as the rechargeable lead-acid batteries gradually failed, it got harder and harder to mow the entire lawn on one charge. We looked into replacing the batteries, but they were going to cost something like $250 — for a mower with all sorts of other stuff wrong with it that had probably cost about $400 when new. I just couldn’t bring myself to spend the money for new batteries.This year the batteries finally stopped charging altogether. What would we do about it?Being a product researcher (it’s an affliction that gobbles up hours but at least finds a useful outlet in our company’s green products directory, GreenSpec) I spent a while learning how far the industry had come in ten years. I still liked the idea of mowing our lawn using electricity — opening up the potential for generating our own power for that task) — but surely the industry had moved beyond our Makita-blue mower (that had lost its slick plastic cover when I removed it one time to see about replacing the batteries and lost the screws).Consumer Reports likes the Black and Decker 19-inch 36-volt mowers (either self-propelled or push-type). But neither Consumer Reports nor the local dealer in Brattleboro likes these mowers as much as gasoline-powered models. They aren’t stocked locally, so I’d have to special-order one. (If only more homeowners pushed for lower-impact products!)We may order one of these, but I’m also watching the technologies. Power tools are converting to more environmentally friendly lithium-ion battery technology in place of nickel-cadmium or sealed lead-acid batteries (the latter being what is used in the Black and Decker mowers). Do I really want to go out and buy a mower (for about $450) with lead-acid batteries and then see the newer technology come along as soon as I’ve bought it? (I have an inquiry into Black and Decker to try to find out if the company’s battery technology will be changing soon.)Meanwhile, my decision-making in the lawn-mowing department got more complicated by our purchase of a farm last fall. All of a sudden we have a much larger lawn to deal with — at least until we succeed in shrinking that lawn area. We’re now at the scale of lawn where a push mower may not be large enough. So far, we’ve been borrowing a generous neighbor’s riding lawn mower, but are less than enthusiastic about purchasing a new riding lawnmower that’s gasoline-powered.center_img Electric riding mowers?What’s the status of riding mowers with battery-powered electric motors? It turns out that there are some. But they’re quite pricey! The company Driven by Solar, Inc. makes the ReCharge Mower G2, a riding mower powered by a 36-volt, 85-amp-hour battery system. The mower has two cutting blades with a 30-inch width and seven cutting heights. The blades spin at 3,600 rpm, which is pretty standard for gasoline-powered riding mowers. The manufacturer’s suggested list price (MSRP) of this made-in-America mower is $2,599.Hustler makes the Zeon zero-turn commercial riding mower with a two-blade, 42-inch deck. The mower weighs in at a hefty 814 pounds with a roll-over protection system (ROPS) installed. The website claims the Zeon can mow a full acre on a single charge. It looks like a great machine, but carries a MSRP of $6,999, with a special Web price of $4,999 — out of our range.And at the top end of the (limited) scale of commercial electric riding mowers seems to be Mean Green Products, LLC. The company’s 36-volt RX-50 riding mower has a 50-inch deck and enough battery capacity to mow about two acres, according to the company. It weighs an even more prodigious 890 pounds, and the price is $9,900. Way out of our price range!These zero-emission, rechargeable electric riding mowers sound pretty good, but you can buy a decent gasoline-powered riding mower for half the price of the cheapest of these.I’d like to use an electric mower and charge it with my own photovoltaic power system, but the cost is just too high, and all of these models currently use lead-acid batteries, which may soon be obsolete and more manufacturers switch to lithium-ion batteries.I’m thinking the answer is to find a decent used riding mower on Craigslist and use it until a battery-powered electric model is affordable. By then I should have a PV system up and running.Or maybe I should buy some goats…. Alex is founder of BuildingGreen, Inc. and executive editor of Environmental Building News. He also coauthored BuildingGreen’s special report on windows that just came out. To keep up with Alex’s latest articles and musings, you can sign up for his Twitter feed.last_img read more

Top 10 Windows 8 Features #2: The Microsoft Account

first_imgRelated Posts The way Microsoft is enabling this is through a much grander exploitation of a feature it introduced in Windows Vista called the roaming profile. Today with Windows 7 in home networks, a user creates his account on one PC.  The hidden user folder of that PC stores profile data about such things as personal folder locations, in a subdirectory named Roaming. This way, when the same user creates an account on another PC in the same network, that other PC can pull pre-existing data from the roaming profile.You may have just figured out, after reading that last sentence, why this feature wasn’t exploited more:  You really shouldn’t have to create a separate account on every PC you own.This is where the new incarnation of Microsoft Account on Windows 8 makes a great deal of sense. Now when you sign onto any device, the data normally stored to the Roaming subdirectory on that first PC, becomes available to the authenticated user wherever you are. Microsoft’s cloud service (the same servers that run Azure) store a snapshot of that subdirectory. Since Windows 8 uses the Roaming subdirectory to store data like wallpaper choices and application settings that can and should be portable, that data automatically becomes available to the cloud service. So any app running on any other device can call on the snapshot; and if the device is active, it can refresh the cloud server’s view of that subdirectory in the background.Today, relatively few third-party software products make use of the Roaming subdirectory because, well, users couldn’t be counted on to care enough to actually roam. Windows 8 gives them the first really good reason to do so. Tags:#Microsoft#web So if your storage is in the cloud, your profile is in the cloud, and your applications are sourced from the Web, your full installation of Office will travel with you from device to device. This is the full promise of the new era of Windows (much more so than the silly Start Screen), and the enabling factor for that promise is the Microsoft Account.ReconciliationThe grander implications are for a kind of virtualized workspace where every app you own, or have rights to use, is accessible under your account from any place. This is not, however, completely feasible. First of all, classic Desktop applications (those compatible with Windows 7 and earlier) must be installed on the devices which run them. Technically, any of these applications that use the Roaming subdirectory to store user data should instantly, without any re-architecture on the part of their developers, enable other devices on which those applications are installed to bring up a user’s preferences. (By “technically,” I mean that the stars should all be properly aligned, there’s no wind, the birds are all singing in the trees and you’re getting paid on time.)  But nothing can be done about the fact that a Desktop application needs to be installed locally on a device to be run from that device.The same holds true with WinRT apps, the new class of Windows 8 programs that are run from tiles you tap from the new Start Screen. What’s different in that case is that the Windows Store keeps track of those WinRT apps whose rights you’ve acquired or purchased at least once. So the Store app at least gives you a way to download and install those apps you own, even on a device you don’t own.This could get hairy.  Imagine a situation where a guest using a hotel lobby PC downloads some WinRT game apps under his account.  Remember, he wouldn’t be using the classic “Guest” account from Windows XP, but his personal Windows 8 setup accessed through his Microsoft Account. But once he logs off, checks out and jets to some foreign destination, how exactly can these apps be uninstalled?This is the type of admin situation I’m happy we’re trying to solve now. I don’t believe Windows 8 will be installed to any great degree in hotel lobbies (where I still mostly find XP) until quandaries such as this are resolved; but now, at least, we’re at that level.In my tests of Windows 8 RTM on a network with mixed Windows 8 and Windows 7 devices, including a Win8 tablet, use of the Microsoft Account as the account name, at last, improves small networks and homegroups.  With Windows 7, it’s still possible for one user to create separate accounts on multiple PCs in the homegroup, the result being that PCs throughout that homegroup have difficulty resolving which Roaming subdirectory is the authentic one. You can see the side-effects of this anomaly in the Homegroup section of Windows 7’s file manager. There, a) individual user accounts are listed separately as though they were separate members, thus creating more homegroup members than there are PCs; b) the Media Devices section lists user accounts individually as well, even though playlists and libraries on those devices are all public and merged. In Windows 8, any homegroup user who logs on using a Microsoft Account will be recognized as one and only one person, regardless of the device she’s logging on from. This is a tremendous improvement, and a very necessary one in the era of PCs and tablets. In my own network, my wife and I each have several PCs rather than just one, though we share a Windows 8 tablet. And yet here we are as individual users rather than split identities!This way, when you need to restrict a person’s access or his permission to change things or delete files, your policies apply to that person wherever he is, as opposed to “John on the media PC” and “John on his laptop.” If he’s logging onto your homegroup from a Remote Desktop Connection, the policies still apply.  (Where local accounts still exist (and in a hybrid network with Win7 devices, they will), those accounts will still show up in the new File Explorer under Computer.) Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… Schizophrenia Is Now More DifficultUnavoidably and, from an architectural standpoint, unfortunately, this will cause some headaches for folks like me who insist on using dual-boot PCs with Windows 7. I have quite a bit invested in Win7 right now, and am not willing to disembark just yet. But this little problem may expedite that event: Because permissions for system folders and personal folders are handled through the NTFS file system that is rendered directly to those folders, whenever Windows 8 attributes policies to Microsoft Accounts, it overwrites whatever traditional, local account-oriented policies were already present.As a result, whenever you boot back into Windows 7, suddenly none of your shared folders or libraries are shared anymore. And if you log on using a limited (non-administrator) account, as is generally wise for security purposes, you may find you don’t have access to your own Documents library until you grant yourself permission again.  =It’s not difficult; it’s just a bother, like returning to your home only to find you’ve locked all the bedroom and bathroom doors on yourself. Changing your policies back for Windows 7 does not impact Windows 8 in the slightest.Everyday users won’t be facing dual-boot scenarios in their everyday work, and the reasons why folks like me will keep using Win7 for a while longer are perhaps peculiar. But the fact that there’s no easy bridge for this problem illustrates the breadth of the gulf we’re jumping by adopting a cloud-based online identity to log onto our devices.There will continue to be well-deserved skepticism over how well Microsoft will be able to manage an identity system that will undoubtedly be under continual attack. (This from the guy who still refuses to join Facebook.)  It is a risk which individual Windows users will weigh for themselves. While they may opt to install local accounts for Windows 8, and to not use SkyDrive or any other cloud-based storage, the easiest way to ensure that option would be to stick with Windows 7 anyway. But I have a short list of features that could, potentially, be a bigger boon for me than the Start Screen is a bust for me. Universal sign-on is one of them.The Top 10 Windows 8 Features So FarNo. 10: Refresh and ResetNo. 9: File HistoryNo. 8: Storage SpacesNo. 7: Client-side Hyper-VNo. 6: Secure BootNo. 5: Live Performance and Reliability ChartsNo. 4: Windows To GoNo. 3: Shared Media “Logging onto” Windows is something a great many users don’t do. Let’s face it, do we log onto our phones?  If we’re okay with our phones pretending they’re us while they move around, why would we need to be protective about devices that mostly stay in one place?  This is a point of view that Microsoft, over the course of the next year, may render as antiquated as the dial tone.An operating system should know its user. This was not a concept Microsoft understood at first. When it formally introduced the “My Documents” folder in Windows 98, folks asked me whether “My” meant “me, the computer” or “me, the user.” Then Windows XP introduced the notion of a user profile. At last, multiple people had personal folders that pertained to them, and “my” meant yours and not anyone else’s. When you signed into XP, the file manager would show you your folders.For many folks, though, that wasn’t much of a convenience. People tended to have XP bypass the whole accounts thing, and created their own folders anyway, with names like “DAD’S PRIVATE STUFF DO NOT TOUCH.” (There’s a really secure folder for you.)Identity FirstMeanwhile, since the turn of the century, Microsoft has had a dream of integrating users’ Windows identities (called security principals) with their Microsoft-brand email addresses, and in turn with a Microsoft-run identity system. As was the case with almost every security-related effort during the XP era, it was rolled out in an embryonic state, and researchers poked holes in it without even trying. Only after several years of wrestling with the consequences did Microsoft come to grips with researchers’ assessments: Tying access to one’s credit cards to a single-factor authentication system that shares the same password with every component in that system, is a manufactured security hole waiting to be exploited.So here we are on the cusp of the Windows 8 era, and we’re faced again with Microsoft’s latest incarnation of shared identity. This time, it’s in front of our face, and it will be much more difficult to bypass. What was the Microsoft Passport, then Windows Live ID and now just the Microsoft Account is the default key for entering the operating system. While you can bypass it, the act of doing so will be much less obvious than for prior incarnations of Windows, and everyday users probably won’t take the time to find out how. As a result, in the first few days after Windows 8 ships, expect the Microsoft Account identity database to eclipse the size of some major countries.Thus the pressing question becomes, does the latest Microsoft Account offer the Windows 8 user anything of genuine value? My answer: Quite possibly.When you install Windows 8, or when you log on for the first time, you’ll be asked to create a Microsoft Account if you don’t already have one. This time, there are good reasons for doing so. Microsoft has now fully realized that users are independent of their computers ­­– or, I should say, of their devices. So when someone is a subscriber to Windows, as a customer will come to be called, that subscription should enable her access to software and certain personal resources from any device she’s using at the time.This is not exactly easy to accomplish, and the full implications of this promise will not yet be realized the day Windows 8 is generally released. But you’ll come to see more as time goes on. For now, the most obvious thing the user will notice is that, whenever she signs onto Windows 8 on any device (not necessarily one that belongs to her), she’ll see her basic preferences on the Start Screen and the basic style, such as her personal wallpaper, on her Desktop.Everywhere You Roam 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market scott fulton To get the best idea of why, imagine if you were an Office 365 subscriber.  With the upcoming version of Office, your subscription uses the same Microsoft Account as does Windows 8. So you effectively have a profile for Office that’s bound to you, and that moves with you. And as I’ve noted in #3 of this series, SkyDrive is also tied to Microsoft Account. What’s more, it’s now the default storage system for Office, which you now have to bypass to get to your local hard drive storage. Recall that an Office 365 app can be run from the Web; it’s not the “Office Web Apps” that we’ve come to know and loathe, but the full products in all their glory.last_img read more

Monitoring of nutrition to go hi-tech in Rajasthan

first_imgMonitoring of nutrition and health-related services in the Anganwadi centres will go hi-tech in Rajasthan during September, which will be observed as a “nutrition month”. With the mobile applications replacing the manual observation methods, smartphones will be supplied to all Anganwadi centres in the State to ensure success of nutrition programmes.Chief Minister Vasundhara Raje had announced in her Independence Day address on August 15 that September would be celebrated as a “nutrition month” to spread awareness about health and nutritional aspects of food in both urban and rural areas. The free milk distribution in schools for the students of Classes I to VIII along with the midday meals was also extended from three days to all days in the week.Orientation workshopAt an orientation workshop for the Integrated Child Development Services (ICDS) officials here on Wednesday, several presentations were made on the activities to be taken up next month for strengthening primary health care of children and improving their nutritional standards. ICDS Director Sushma Arora said new strategies would ensure success of the National Nutrition Mission (NNM).The district-level officers of the connected departments, including Rural Development & Panchayati Raj, Medical & Health, Education, Water Resources and Sanitation, also attended the workshop. Roli Singh, Principal Secretary (Women & Child Development), said the results of new initiatives on the front of nutrition were very encouraging.The activities to be conducted at the district and block headquarters and in Anganwadi centres during September will connect nutrition with the development of human capital, earlier considered a burden. World Bank’s representative Arvind Singhal and UNICEF representative Nizamuddin Ahmed made suggestions for removal of systemic barriers.Rajasthan plans to implement NNM with a vision document for 2022, which is at present being formulated to ensure convergence of work by all stakeholders for improving nutrition levels of women and children and reducing under-nutrition and low birth weight by 2% each year.The NNM, approved by the Union Cabinet, will be implemented in 24 of the 33 districts in the State. The declaration of September as a “nutrition month” forms part of the strategies for addressing the issue of under-nutrition and stunting.last_img read more