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PM Christie says FNM an incredibly unreliable choice for governmemt

first_img ALERT # 2 ON POTENTIAL TROPICAL CYCLONE NINE ISSUED BY THE BAHAMAS DEPARTMENT OF METEOROLOGY THURSDAY 12TH SEPTEMBER, 2019 AT 9 PM EDT Photo credit: Nassau Guardian Recommended for you Related Items:#magneticmedianews Electricity Cost of Service Study among the big agenda items at September 11 Cabinet meetingcenter_img Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppBahamas, March 3, 2017 – Nassau – Fresh off of the now infamous hand gesture, PLP Party Leader and Prime Minister Perry Christie at a political event last night labelled the FNM as an incredibly unreliable choice for government.  Christie said he has lost track of how many leaders they have been through and he asked the crowd gathered at the meeting for Carmichael, Southern Shores and Golden Isles, ‘if the FNM was Government of the Bahamas today; who would be running the country, which one?”  Mr Christie commended his own team and said, “politics is about working together to accommodate a democracy.”#MagneticMediaNews The Luxury of Grace Bay in Down Town Provolast_img read more

Shocking Imran Khans weak and frail look goes viral fans left worried

first_imgVarinder ChawlaA few days after the news of troubles in his marital life broke out, Imran Khan was spotted outside his gym. While Imran smiled for the paparazzi, netizens have been left worried with the actor’s ‘weak’ and ‘frail’ look.Almost unrecognisable in the picture, Imran Khan seems to have lost a lot of weight and looking much, much leaner than earlier. Dressed in a white t-shirt, shorts and a cap, Imran’s look has left his fans worried. There were reports of the actor and his wife, Avantika Malik, having decided to call-off their wedding owing to some irreconcilable differences.While Imran and Avantika chose to stay silent on the matter, Avantika’s mother Vandana Malik had opened up on the separation news. “We all (Vandana, Avantika and Imran) read the news and let me tell you that there’s no such thing. There are some differences (between the husband and wife), which will be sorted anyway.” On being asked whether these differences would lead to divorce, her mother said, “Absolutely not.”A source told DNA, “Avantika left 24, Pali Hill, Imran’s residence, a while ago with Imara (daughter). It is being said that she is currently staying with her family.”What sparked the rumours of their separation further was the fact that while on one hand, Imran Khan had stopped posting pictures of him with his wife and daughter after July, 2017. Avantika too has not shared any picture of herself with Imran Khan like earlier.Imran Khan, who is the nephew of superstar Aamir Khan, had made his successful Bollywood debut with – Jaane Tu Ya Jaane Na – opposite Genelia Dsouza. However, post the massive success of the film, Imran’s career lost track. A few insignificant roles here and there and soon Imran disappeared from the big screen and also the minds of his people.last_img read more

First aid flight in weeks lands in rebelheld Yemen

first_imgTechnicians unload doses of vaccines from a plane after it landed in the rebel-held Yemeni capital Sanaa. Photo: AFPA UN plane carrying desperately needed vaccines landed in the rebel-held Yemeni capital Sanaa on Saturday after a three-week Saudi-led aid blockade that had sparked warnings thousands could die.Three other aircraft—two carrying UN aid workers and one carrying International Committee of the Red Cross staff—also landed at the airport, which was repaired earlier this week after a Saudi-led air strike knocked out its controls, an AFP correspondent reported.The UN humanitarian affairs office had said on Friday that it had been given clearance by the Saudi-led coalition that has been fighting the rebels since 2015 to resume flights into Sanaa.But it added that desperately needed shipments of food and medicines to the rebel-held Red Sea port of Hodeida remained blocked.A official from the rebel-run civil aviation authority confirmed that the flights had landed.But he warned that Saturday’s aid delivery was not enough and demanded access to Sanaa airport for all flights in order to “save the lives of the sick”, the rebel-run Saba news agency reported.The UN children’s fund UNICEF said the flight was carrying more than 15 tonnes, or 1.9 million doses, of vaccine for diphtheria, tetanus and other preventable diseases.The World Health Organization said earlier this week that diphtheria was spreading as children went unvaccinated and doctors in Hodeida reported three deaths.More than 2,000 people have died of cholera in Yemen this year, adding to the 8,600 who have died in the conflict between the Saudi-backed government and the rebels since 2015.The aid blockade, put in place after the rebels fired a missile which was intercepted over Riyadh airport, has tightened the stranglehold on Hodeida, the conduit for UN supervised deliveries of food and medicine to rebel-held territory.The UN humanitarian office said that a ship loaded with wheat and another with equipment to treat Yemen’s cholera epidemic are ready to head to Hodeida as soon as the Saudi-led coalition gives the go-ahead.The coalition had said it would lift its blockade of the port from Thursday but it remains in place.The United Nations has warned that unless the blockade is lifted, Yemen will face “the largest famine the world has seen for decades”.Yemen is highly dependent on imported wheat for its basic needs and aid groups have warned that humanitarian deliveries cover only a small portion of the need.Seven million Yemenis are completely dependent on relief supplies for their survival, according to the UN.last_img read more

Christopher Wray Confirmed As Next FBI Director

first_img Share Alex Wong/Getty ImagesChristopher Wray is sworn in during the confirmation hearing on his nomination for FBI director before the Senate Judiciary Committee last month.The Senate has easily confirmed Christopher Wray to be the next FBI director, a position he assumes after former Director James Comey was ousted by President Trump in May.The 50-year-old former Justice Department lawyer was approved by a 92-5 vote.Wray was Trump’s choice to lead the FBI after he decided to fire Comey — a controversial decision that led to the appointment of special counsel Robert Mueller to take over the bureau’s investigation into Russian interference in last year’s elections and possible collusion between top aides to the Trump campaign and Russia.During his confirmation hearing last month before the Senate Judiciary Committee — which approved him unanimously for the post — Wray stressed his independence from the White House and underscored that he believes the intelligence community’s determination that Russia interfered in the 2016 presidential race, even though Trump has at times cast doubt on that assessment.Wray pledged he would “never allow the FBI’s work to be driven by anything other than the facts, the law and the impartial pursuit of justice. Period.” And he added that anyone who thought he would pull any punches as FBI director “sure doesn’t know me very well.”Wray also said he was “very committed to supporting Director Mueller in the special counsel investigation in whatever way is appropriate for me to do that,” and added that any effort to tamper with or influence the investigation would be “unacceptable and inappropriate” and would, in his view, need to be dealt with “very sternly.” Wray also said he had not given anyone “any kind loyalty oath at any point in the process” when he was under consideration for the appointment by the White House.According to NPR’s Carrie Johnson, Wray “has spent years working in and around the U.S. Justice Department, making national security policy and overseeing cases against corrupt business executives. But he’s operated outside the spotlight, by design.”That shunning of the spotlight has earned him praise and led many to conclude he can help steady the agency at a time of upheaval and increased scrutiny. Wray was a former federal prosecutor in Atlanta before joining the George W. Bush Justice Department as it dealt with the aftermath of the Sept. 11 attacks.Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.last_img read more

Engineers investigate why the cochlea is coiled

first_img This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Simulated beam patterns of straight and spiral cochleas: While the straight cochlea generates beam patterns without any vertical variation, the spiral cochlea generates beam patterns that vertically localize the sound source. Image credit: Xun Huang, et al. ©2012 EPLA Citation: Engineers investigate why the cochlea is coiled (2012, June 14) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2012-06-cochlea.html Copyright 2012 Phys.org All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed in whole or part without the express written permission of PhysOrg.com. The researchers, Xun Huang, Chi Xu, and Long Bai, at Peking University in Beijing, China, have published their study on the coiled cochlea’s ability to provide vertical sound localization in a recent issue of EPL.The idea that the cochlea’s spiral shape has perceptual benefits is somewhat surprising, since currently most cochlear models used in research simplify the cochlea as a straight system. This simplification seems justified because numerical simulations have shown that a straight cochlea and coiled cochlea have a similar mechanical oscillation amplitude, which describe the vibrations that get sent to the brain. However, recent research has suggested that there may be significant differences in the way that straight and coiled cochlea respond to sound.“One previous paper stated that the spiral’s graded curvature enhances the cochlea’s mechanical response to low frequencies,” Huang told Phys.org. “Our work is the first one in sound localization. Basically, most previous works focus on ‘low level’ functions, such as mechanical response. We show that sound localization may be one of the potential functions of the cochlea’s coiled geometry, which was assumed solely developed for saving space.”As all individuals with good hearing can attest, the ears can detect the source of a sound in both the horizontal and vertical planes. Horizontally, a sound source produces a time and volume difference between the left and right ears because the ears have different horizontal positions. But since the left and right ears are positioned at the same height on the head, a sound source in the sagittal plane (the vertical plane that divides the body into left and right halves) produces no difference between the two ears based on the source’s vertical position. Instead, two parts of the ear called the pinna and tragus help mammals achieve vertical sound localization.However, recent experiments with the brown bat (Eptesicus fuscus) have suggested the existence of an alternative mechanism for vertical sound localization. After researchers disabled the function of the bat’s tragus, its vertical sound localization capability was weakened, but only temporarily. After a period of adaptation, the capability was partially restored due to an alternative mechanism. It’s not over when it’s over: Storing sounds in the inner earcenter_img More information: Xun Huang, et al. “Is the cochlea coiled to provide sound localization?” EPL, 98 (2012) 58002. DOI: 10.1209/0295-5075/98/58002 (Phys.org) — The word “cochlea” comes from the Latin for “snail shell.” While this inner ear component has a clear spiral shape, it’s currently unclear why that is. In the 1980s, scientists supposed that the shape evolved solely for space conservation, but in the past few years researchers have questioned this view and proposed that the spiral curvature could have perceptual benefits as well. In a recent study, a team of engineers has added evidence to this view by performing simulations showing that a coiled cochlea can detect the source of a sound in the vertical direction significantly better than a straight cochlea. As the researchers show here, one potential alternative way of achieving vertical sound localization could be the coiled shape of the cochlea. To begin, they proposed that the human hearing system might adopt a method similar to adaptive beamforming, a technique used for directional signal processing, to process sound signals for the brain. In their simulations, the researchers modeled the thousands of hair cells in the 3.5-cm-long cochlea as a sensor array in the context of beamforming. Then they compared how this sensor array perceived sound pressure when arranged in a straight vs. spiral geometry. Their results revealed that straight and spiral cochleas generate different beam patterns, i.e., acoustic images of the sound sources. For all sound sources, the straight cochlea generates a beam pattern that spans the entire vertical range, providing no vertical sound localization. In contrast, the coiled cochlea generates different and much narrower beam patterns for different sound sources, providing significantly improved vertical sound localization. For horizontal sound localization, the straight and coiled cochleas show comparable performance.The finding that vertical sound localization can be improved purely by geometric changes supports the argument that the cochlea’s coiled shape is useful not just for conserving space. The results could be helpful for designing cochlear implants and echolocation systems, in which sound waves are used to detect objects.“From the very beginning, we were actually studying bat flight control based on sound echolocation,” Huang said. “As you can see, vertical sound localization is very important for bat flight. However, the biological information of a bat’s cochlea is not so accessible. Hence, we used the human cochlea as a test case.”Huang added that they are currently designing experiments in an anechoic chamber to test the results of these simulations. Explore furtherlast_img read more