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South African wine bottles get ‘smart’

first_img15 September 2011South African website wine.co.za is offering free QR-codes – codes that can be read by smartphones – to local wine estates for use on their bottles, giving consumers quick and easy access to information about the wine on the internet.QR-codes (Quick Response Codes) are a kind of barcode that is printed on a product or label, which can then be photographed and interpreted by a smartphone. They usually contain links to enable easy access to websites, negating the need for consumers to have to type in long addresses or URLs.“By placing a QR-Code on say a back label, a wine producer can supply much more detailed information about their wine, directly to the consumer, at the time of purchase,” wine.co.za said in a statement this week. “In the case of wine.co.za, we have already created a mobi-page for every wine in our extensive database.“This page will present the full technical analysis, tasting notes, accolades, contact details of the producer.”Adding value to marketingAccording to wine.co.za, Wines of South Africa recently requested producers to take a look at QR-Codes as they add huge value to marketing wines, at very low cost, and with the free QR-Codes the cost remains very low.All wine producers need to do is to ensure that their information is kept up to date on wine.co.zaTo check out QR-Codes in action, go to www.wine.co.za/mobi and select a winery name to show a list of wines that wine.co.za has generated QR codes for.Then use your cell phone’s barcode reader to “photograph” that image. A web page will appear on your browser with everything about the chosen wine.Many smartphones come preloaded with QR-code readers. Otherwise, QR-code readers can be downloaded from the native “app” store.SAinfo reporterWould you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See: Using SAinfo materiallast_img read more

Biobased fuels the subject of March workshop in Wooster

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Biobased fuels and products — those made from crops and waste from farms — are the focus of an upcoming workshop in Wooster.Advanced Biobased Systems: Growing an Industry is March 16 at the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center (OARDC), 1680 Madison Ave.It’s for anyone involved with or interested in the biobased industry, said organizer Ajay Shah, an assistant professor at OARDC and the head of its Biobased Systems Analysis Lab, the sponsor of the event.Expected to attend are farmers, scientists, processors, manufacturers, commodity representatives, and people in the ethanol, biodiesel and transportation industries, Shah said.“The potential of agricultural biomass as a renewable feedstock for fuels and chemicals continues to grow,” he said. “But there’s still a need to make biobased systems more efficient, environmentally friendly, and technically and economically viable.”Featured speaker is Iowa State’s KeenerThe workshop hopes to foster such progress, Shah said. Speakers from academia and industry, including featured speaker Kevin Keener from Iowa State University, will share their ideas and perspectives. There will be time for networking and discussion.Keener, who’s a food science and human nutrition professor at Iowa State and directs its Center for Crops Utilization Research and BioCentury Research Farm, will speak on “Biomass Utilization in Iowa: Research and Technology Development.”Also speakers from Ohio State, industryShah will present “Feedstock for Biobased Industries” based on his research as a faculty member in the Department of Food, Agricultural and Biological Engineering at The Ohio State University. Both the department and OARDC are part of the university’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES).Also scheduled to speak are:Denny Hall, director of Ohio State’s OBIC Bioproducts Innovation Center, on “Biobased Industries: Setting the Stage.”Ana Alonso, associate professor in Ohio State’s Department of Molecular Genetics, on “Pennycress as a Next Generation Feedstock.”Thaddeus Ezeji, associate professor in Ohio State’s Department of Animal Sciences, which also is part of CFAES, on “Biomass Conversion to Biofuels and Other Products.”Prabhat Krishnaswamy, senior vice president with Columbus-based EMC2, on “Utilizing Biobased Fibers for Composites.”Fred Circle, president of FDC Enterprises of Springfield, on “Feedstock Logistics for Biobased Industries” and “Bioproducts Case Study: Thermal Energy from Locally Grown Switchgrasses.”The speakers from Ohio State “will focus on their research, including the development of crops and processes for biobased energy and products,” Shah said.‘What’s happening in the real world’The industry speakers “will highlight what’s happening in the real world, including successes and challenges,” he said.The workshop is from 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. in OARDC’s Shisler Conference Center. Wooster is about 30 miles east of Akron, 60 miles south of Cleveland and 95 miles north of Columbus.Register by March 7, save $10Registration for the event, which includes continental breakfast, lunch and refreshments, is $50 by March 7 and $60 afterward. Details and a registration form can be downloaded at go.osu.edu/BiobasedWorkshop.For more information, contact Mary Wicks of OARDC at wicks.14@osu.edu or 330-202-3533.The OBIC center, the OARDC-based BioHio Research Park and Ohio State’s Sustainability and Resilient Economy Discovery Theme are also supporting the workshop.last_img read more

Liquid-Applied Flashing

first_imgBy now, most conscientious builders know that window rough openings need to be carefully flashed before a window is installed. For residential builders, the most common way, by far, to flash window rough openings is with peel-and-stick flashing.However, an increasing number of builders are taking a closer look at something different: liquid-applied flashing.Liquid-applied flashing comes in various forms. Some products are dispensed from cartridges like caulk; others come in a pail and have the consistency of mayonnaise.If you are using liquid-applied flashing to flash a window rough opening, you squeeze or spread a generous amount on the surfaces that need flashing — generally the rough sill, the rough jambs, the head, and a 6 to 8 inch wide band of the wall sheathing around the perimeter of the rough opening — and then you spread the material out with a trowel or a plastic Bondo spreading tool. (Some products have a thinner consistency that can be applied with a brush or roller.) Most manufacturers advise adding enough material to make an opaque layer — one that you can’t see through.In addition to being useful for flashing window rough openings, liquid-applied flashings can be used to flash penetrations through wall sheathing — for example, vent pipes or plumbing pipes.Liquid-applied flashings are stick tenaciously to a wide variety of materials. Most manufacturers of liquid-applied flashing claim that their products stick to plywood, OSB, framing lumber, concrete, CMUs, brick, aluminum, painted steel, vinyl, rigid foam, glass, and EPDM. (Note, however, that some manufacturers warn that their products don’t stick to housewrap.)Most brands of liquid-applied flashing can bridge cracks up to 1/4 inch wide without the need for any caulk or reinforcing mesh. Once cured, these flashings form a rubbery layer that is vapor-permeable yet waterproof and airtight.This installation method is fairly… This article is only available to GBA Prime Members Start Free Trial Already a member? Log incenter_img Sign up for a free trial and get instant access to this article as well as GBA’s complete library of premium articles and construction details.last_img read more

Shah urged to ensure justice for Sanaullah

first_imgCongress MP Gaurav Gogoi has urged Union Home Minister Amit Shah to ensure “justice” to Kargil war veteran Mohammad Sanaullah, who has been recently declared a ‘foreigner’ and sent to a detention camp. Mr. Gogoi, in his letter to Mr. Shah, made available to the media on Thursday, urged him to institute an inquiry into the alleged inefficiency of police officers who verified his documents and the subsequent declaration of the former Army personnel as ‘foreigner’ by the Foreigners’ Tribunal at Boko. The Congress MP, elected to the Lok Sabha for the second consecutive term from Kaliabor, demanded that the erring officials be barred from continuing their duty in such “irresponsible manner”. People of Assam are pinning hopes on the central government for justice, he insisted. “Sanaullah’s long service in the armed forces is proof of his patriotism and citizenship and we sincerely want relief for the veteran aAmyman,” the MP added. A resident Kolohikash village in Boko area of Kamrup district, Mr. Sanaullah was serving as a sub-inspector in the Assam Border Police before being declared a “foreigner” on May 23 and dismissed from service.Decorated ArmymanEarlier, he had also served in the Electronic and Mechanical Services of the armed forces and was awarded the President’s Medal in 2014. He is currently lodged at a detention centre at Goalpara district in the State.last_img read more