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Proud moments at the Deele College Prizegiving – Pic Special

first_imgDeele College celebrated their annual school prize-giving this morning in the school sports-hall with special guest, Minister Joe McHugh in attendance.A large congregation of students, teachers, parents and other members of the school community gathered to honour the achievements of the school’s students both inside and outside the classroom.It was a day of celebration, yet it was a day tinged with sadness, as the husband of the late Grainne O’Donnell who died earlier this year, was present to award the ‘Science Student of the Year’ to Conor Wilson. It was a fitting tribute to the former science teacher, who was such a pivotal member of the teaching staff at Deele College and her memory will live on through this perpetual award for students who excel in science.Head Girl, Tyler Toland won numerous awards, both for her record-breaking antics in the world of soccer and also academic awards, which show what a hard-working and dedicated student she is.Indeed, it was noted that the airport staff in Dublin are well acquainted with the Maiden City star, whose luggage is persistently over the designated weight due to the bulk of her school books.No matter where in the world she is jetting off to, the school books are with her. Another highlight of the event was the acknowledgement of the ‘Clean-Guard’ team, who won the national NFTE Entrepreneurial Competition last week in Dublin.The team, which consists of Ellie Baron, Stephanie Harper and Saffron Porter will now go on to represent Ireland in Barcelona at the European competition.Ellie Baron was also awarded the best Junior Cert award.Ronan McKinley, a TY student who plays with Derry City, was highlighted for his role in the recent U-17 European Championships, where he represented Ireland, while Ellie Spence, Oisin Toye, Cate Toland, Gavin McGee, Holly Canning, Jade Duffy, Aine Kerr and Aine-Marie McBride were acknowledged for their participation in elite sport.Kellie Nesbitt picked up the coveted ‘Prefect of the Year,’ while there was a huge round of applause for Tyler Toland, who picked up the ‘Overall Student of the Year Award.’ Guest Speaker, Minister for Education and Skills, Joe McHugh said that he was both astounded and fascinated by the wide variety of both success and participation in extra-curricular activities in the school.He highlighted the role that teachers play in getting students ready for not just exams, but for entry into the wider world.He also noted the importance of the school’s history, with a number of awards named after past teachers, especially the recent award dedicated to Grainne O’Donnell and said that the award will keep her memory alive forever in the school.Jumping eloquently between English and Irish, he congratulated the school in their efforts to make the Irish language part of our daily lives. He insisted that it was through the promotion of our native tongue that would keep our culture alive. He urged students to be bold, to be brave, to try new things and to never be afraid. He told the students that if they weren’t making mistakes, they simply weren’t learning.“The small mistakes we make every day are essential for our learning. It’s how we get better, it’s how we achieve success.“I want all of you to keep doing what you are doing, you are on the right track, keep making mistakes, keep trying new things and success will never be far away.”Proud moments at the Deele College Prizegiving – Pic Special was last modified: May 22nd, 2019 by Shaun KeenanShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Do Confusing Branches Add up to a Darwin Tree?

first_imgEvolutionists routinely try to construct parts of Darwin’s grand “tree of life” from fossils and genes.  Do the parts come together as expected?Camels & mammals:  The genome of a Bactrian (two-humped) camel named Mozart was deciphered.  According to Science Daily, “The DNA code also represents a rich resource for addressing questions on phylogenetic relationships between animals.”  So far, though, all the geneticists found was 85% similarity to the one-humped dromedary camel.  They hope it will clarify relationships with llamas and alpacas, too, but that work remains to be done.Zebrafish & mermaids:  Alongside a photo of a lovely lady swimming underwater, Michael Gross wrote in Current Biology,  “While we humans tend to have grandiose ideas about our special position in the tree of life, more than 70% of our genes have an obvious orthologue in zebrafish.”  Other than telling sweeping stories of evolutionary transitions, Gross only mentioned the coelacanth genome and the zebrafish genome as data, noting that “zebrafish has the largest number of unique genes (3,634) not shared with any of the others” (chicken, mouse, and human).  And despite the major changes involved in moving from sea to land, he wrote, “Arthropods must have made the transition at least five times, as researchers have concluded from phylogenetic trees.”Tree of life is fishy:  In “Somethings’s fishy in the tree of life,” Science Daily reported on the largest comparison of fish genes to date, providing data that “dramatically increase understanding of fish evolution and their relationships.”  Some assembly required, after disassembling previous assumptions and “proposing” relationships nobody would have expected:While some of the findings provide new support for previously understood fish relationships, others significantly change existing ideas. Many different groupings are proposed in this new tree. For example, tunas and marlins are both fast-swimming marine fishes with large, streamlined bodies, yet they appear on very different branches of the tree. Tunas appear to be more closely related to the small, sedentary seahorses, whereas marlins are close relatives of flatfishes, which are bottom-dwelling and have distinctive asymmetric heads.Fish & Hips:  A short article on Science Daily tries to explain the “fishy origin of our hips.”  We’re related to salamanders, by implication: it only took a “few evolutionary steps” to convert fins to hips.  Even though humans are thought to be very distant on Darwin’s tree, “the differences between us and them are not as great as they appear — most of the key elements necessary for the transformation to human hips were actually already present in our fish ancestors,” the article alleges.  And that’s because “Many of the muscles thought to be ‘new’ in tetrapods evolved from muscles already present in lungfish,” a Monash University evolutionist said.  “We also found evidence of a new, more simple path by which skeletal structures would have evolved.”  A picture of an axolotl adorns the article—but that’s a salamander, not a fish.Speaking of salamanders, an article on PhysOrg alleges that the “repeated evolution of high foraging rates in spotted salamanders” shows the “invisible finger of evolution” at work.  Quote from the evolutionary spokesman from U of Connecticut: “Finding that adaptive evolution may disguise strong ecological effects means that a range of ecological predictions are likely to be unreliable if we ignore how evolution affects biological communities” — i.e., evolution and ecology are so “inexorably intertwined,” one can mask the other.Snakes alive, and hopeful lizards:  A researcher with his team at George Washington U has built a new evolutionary tree of all lizards and snakes around the globe, 4,161 species in all.  “While there are gaps on some branches of the tree,” the lead acknowledged, “the structure of the tree goes a long way toward fully mapping every genus and species group.”  He thinks he knows what will fill the gaps, even though the project is preliminary: “this estimate of the squamate tree of life shows us what we do know, and more importantly, what we don’t know, and will hopefully spur even more research on the amazing diversity of lizards and snakes.”Speaking of lizards, here’s a big one.  While listening to music from The Doors, Jason Head (U of Nebraska) found a six-footer he named after Jim Morrison (leader of the rock band, who apparently committed suicide).  Thought to have lived 40 million years ago, Barbaturex morrisoni was larger than many of the mammals it munched on.  Head attributed today’s paucity of large lizards to climate change.  Apparently global temperatures and carbon dioxide levels were much higher back then, even with human smokestacks and automobiles around.  “We think the warm climate during that period of time allowed the evolution of a large body size and the ability of plant-eating lizards to successfully compete in mammal faunas,” he said (PhysOrg).  Is he proposing reptile size as a function of temperature?  Why, then, were there large dinosaurs in the arctic circle?  Why are lizards smaller today, to first approximation, in hot as well as cold climates?Ant what they used to be:  How’s the ant branch coming along?  Science Daily reported on a new ant family tree that supposedly “Confirms Date of Evolutionary Origin” and “Underscores Importance of Neotropics” in their emergence.  Data from genes and fossils were used to build the largest ancestry diagram for ants.  According to the phylogenists, “the rainforests of the Neotropics are both a museum, protecting many of the oldest ant groups, and also a cradle that continues to generate new species.”  In other words, some evolve and some don’t.  “This ant tree-of-life confirmed an earlier surprising finding that two groups of pale, eyeless, subterranean ants, which are unlike most typical ants, are the earliest living ancestors of the modern ants.”  It would seem easier to lose eyes than to gain them.Planting trees in the fast lane:  “Biologists have known for a long time that some creatures evolve more quickly than others,” begins an article on PhysOrg. “Exactly why isn’t well understood, particularly for plants.”  A new notion is that short plants grow in the “evolutionary fast lane” compared to tall plants.  At the U.S. National Evolutionary Synthesis Center, researchers estimated the average height of 140 families of plants, then plotted them against their assumed date of emergence in the fossil record to conclude (to their surprise) that “shorter plants evolved as much as five times faster than taller ones.”  Why would that be?  They surmised that the tips of small plants generate more mistakes:What puts short plants in the evolutionary fast lane? The researchers suspect the difference may be driven by genetic changes that accumulate in the actively-dividing cells in the tip of the plant shoot as it grows. Cells don’t copy their DNA perfectly each time they divide. In animals, most DNA copy mistakes that occur in the cells of the animal’s body can’t be inherited—they’re evolutionary dead ends. But this isn’t the case for plants, where genetic changes in any part of the plant could potentially get passed on if those cells eventually form flowers or other reproductive organs.For the notion to work, “the rate of cell division and genome copying in taller plants eventually slows down, and changes in DNA—the raw material for evolution—accumulates less quickly.”  Sounds like a hypothesis in need of observation.Does Darwin need his tree?  As reported here May 15, the “tree of life” is a tangled bramble bush, according to an article on Science Daily.  Astrobiology Magazine went further to debunk the notion of a “tree of life” with a last universal common ancestor (LUCA).  But their idea of “digging down below the tree of life” threatens to uproot it:A family tree unites a diverse group of individuals that all carry genetic vestiges from a single common ancestor at the base of the tree. But this organizational structure falls apart if genetic information is a communal resource as opposed to a family possession.The article stressed the significance of horizontal gene transfer,  Nigel Goldenfield (U of Chicago) stated it this way: “Our perspective is that life emerged from a collective state, and so it is not at all obvious that there is one single organism which was ancestral.”  Although this refers to the trunk of the tree, the impact of the new idea flows upward.  “In his work,[Peter]  Gogarten [U of Connecticut] has shown that horizontal gene transfer turns the tree of life into a thick bush of branches that interweave with each other.”  (see also 2/01/07). The new ideas of Carl Woese (1/28/10), Goldenfield and Gogarten are examples of “the evolution of evolution,” the article suggests (see 12/19/07).The group is particularly interested in the question of how the ability to evolve originally developed. The “evolution of evolution” sounds like a chicken-and-egg problem — especially if you think, as Goldenfeld does, that life is by definition something capable of evolving.However, evolution can utilize different mechanisms to achieve the same goal. Goldenfeld’s team will try to recover some of life’s former evolutionary phases by stressing cells and then seeing how their genomes rearrange in response.It appears, then, that to salvage evolutionary theory, astrobiologists must personify evolution (“evolution can utilize different mechanisms“) and dispense with Darwin’s core concept of unguided natural selection (“to achieve the same goal“).Goldenfield, a physicist, tries to see evolution in thermodynamics terms in order to come up with rules of “universal biology.”  However it is viewed, it’s clear that evolutionists have a long way to go.  He said, “We would like to have a better understanding of why life exists at all.”Why does life exist at all?  Because it was created.  It didn’t just happen.  We can say that confidently after showcasing once again the utter bankruptcy of evolutionary theory (10/19/10). Did you catch that the zebrafish has 3,634 unique genes?  What’s the probability of those arising without design?After 154 years of Darwin, evolutionists are not even sure there is a tree of life.  Creationists have the certainty of a life-giving, created tree of life: in the beginning and at the end.  Don’t be fooled by the mystical divination of modern-day shamans who use mumbo-jumbo like “the evolution of evolution” or “the invisible finger of evolution” to keep their fake tree fable going (2/01/07 commentary), who refuse to acknowledge the clear evidence for design, and who keep promising understanding that never comes. (Visited 21 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

6 Trends Startups Must Cope With In 2013 – From Paul Kedrosky

first_imgWhat Nobody Teaches You About Getting Your Star… Tags:#predictions#startups tim devaney and tom stein Predicting the future is notoriously difficult, and the volatile world of high-tech startups don’t make things any easier. That’s why ReadWrite turned to famous and fearless tech prognosticator Paul Kedrosky, a senior fellow at the Kauffman Foundation, focused on entrepreneurship, innovation and the future of risk capital, to ask him his predictions for the startup world in 2013.Kedrosky shared six thoughtful insights about what the future is likely to bring. Most of them could be seen as warning signs, but there are some bright spots sprinkled in there as well.1. Accelerators Will Slow DownStartup accelerators were a big story in 2012. By the midpoint of the year there were more than 200 accelerators worldwide, attracting twice as many applicants as they did just two years ago. Recently, however, it’s become clear that most accelerators were not turning out viable companies. And now we’re seeing the first signs of an accelerator slowdown. Y Combinator, the world’s leading accelerator, cut its funding to $80,000 from $150,000 per company and reduced its next class to less than 50, down from 84 in the most recent group.“I think this will turn out to be the peak,” Kedrosky said, “But that does not mean things will tail off dramatically” because accelerators are relatively cheap to start. “This move by Y Combinator is significant… This was not a gut decision but one that was empirically driven by the quality of the incoming classes they were seeing. And what they saw happening with their outgoing classes and their propensity to raise funding.”2. The Enterprise Will Strike BackRevenue. What a concept. It took a few years – and a few thousand failed consumer internet startups – but investors have gone back to the basics and now demand that companies they fund have income, not just a lot of Web users or app downloads. That means more funding for startups targeting the enterprise in 2013, less funding for startups aimed at consumers.A related trend Kedrosky sees is the return of discipline. “You won’t see crazy valuations,” he says. “Discipline went out the window the last few years – and it comes back in 2013.”3. The Cash Gap Will Fix the Talent GapThe toughest job for startups in recent years was not pulling investment but attracting talented people. With funding freely available, companies launched right and left. Combine that with ever-present competition from high-paying tech giants like Facebook, Google and Twitter and you’ve created a severe talent shortage.Kedrosky predicts the talent gap will be closed in 2013. “I notice that good startups are now composed of a group of people who two or three years ago would have been out doing their own thing,” he said. “Now they’re happy to work as team that has a real chance of going somewhere. The reason for that is the cash trade. Cash now versus cash later. It’s generally accepted that cash later is going to be a lot harder to come by, whether it’s in the form of funding cash or exit cash.”4. Venture Capital Will ReboundEveryone’s talking about the coming Series A funding crunch. Kedrosky thinks it will be eased by the return to the venture market of big investors like pension funds. They’ve been staying away from venture funding after getting burned in the downturn – but they’re beginning to come back.“That’s been the story for the last six years, actually – Limited Partners (LPs) shying away from the asset class,” he said. “But I think this is the end of the venture market contraction. I think these LPs will stop cutting their commitment to venture funds because they see it as a lottery ticket in their portfolios. The rate of new venture partnerships getting funded will be the highest in a decade or more next year. As a result, that will change the dynamics in the market fairly materially.”5. Startup Ecosystems Will Go ExtinctCountries from Chile to Turkey have tried to cook up their own startup ecosystems in the past couple of years. Most have discovered just how difficult it is to make a Silicon Valley from scratch. You can’t simply choose a local geographic feature, attach the word “Silicon” and wait for the high-tech boom.“My feeling is that these efforts will prove to have been mis-timed to the market peak,” Kedrosky said. “I’m not optimistic about the success of these startup ecosystems and that will begin to show next year. Too often these first attempts are sheer mimicry of what’s happening in Silicon Valley. ‘Let’s do what the U.S. is doing but let’s do it years later.’ That’s not sustainable. It’s not the basis for building a fertile ecosystem.”The upside is that a lot of young people got their first taste of entrepreneuring and may very well be more successful the next time around. “This first wave will end badly,” Kedrosky says, “but they could go on in the future to do bigger and better things.”6. Big Data Will CrashBig data startups were a big deal in 2012. But the big data sector is in for a large letdown in 2013, Kedrosky predicted. “We’ve hit the end of that cycle. We’ll soon start to ask, ‘Why there were so many startups in big data and how come so many got funded?’ People will have post-funding regret in the space.”As clean-tech startups were revealed to be unsuccessful in 2012, Kedrosky forecasted 2013 will be the year that exposes big data startups. “It will be revealed that data alone is not enough for these companies to make money. In the past, the thinking was, ‘If I have enough eyeballs I can make money.’ That proved to be wrong. In the same way, just having the data will also prove to be wrong in terms of being able to make money… What really matters is having a paying customer.” China and America want the AI Prize Title: Who …center_img Related Posts How to Get Started in China and Have Success How OKR’s Completely Transformed Our Culturelast_img read more

Australian Open Squads In Camp

first_imgAustralia’s Men’s, Women’s and Mixed Open squads will travel to Sydney this weekend for a training camp in preparation for the 2013 Super Trans Tasman Series to be held in Auckland next February.  The Australians are hopeful of continuing their strong form against New Zealand on the Touch Football field after their impressive 3-0 whitewash of their Trans Tasman counterparts in Mudgee earlier this year.  This will be the final selection medium for athletes to impress their respective coaches before teams are decided on and final preparation for the Open’s division title defence begins. The Super Trans Tasman will be the biggest Trans Tasman held yet, with 12 divisions – four Youth, three Open and five Masters – travelling to Auckland to compete. Stay tuned to the TFA website for all of the latest news in the lead up to the 2013 Super Trans Tasman Series – www.austouch.com.au.Related LinksAussie Squads In Camplast_img read more

An Historic Day for Touch Football!

first_imgTuesday, August 13, 2013The National Rugby League (NRL) and Touch Football Australia have today launched an historic sporting partnership representing the biggest boost to participation and game development in the history of either sport. The two sports will work together as part of a strategic alliance to create the largest sporting community in the country which will reflect the wider support that exists for Rugby League and the game’s commitment to ensuring there is a ‘place on the field’ for everyone.The new agreement will bring more than 1.03 million participants together playing in competitions under a joint NRL-TFA banner. This is in addition to the 844,000 girls and boys who currently take part in NRL Development programs each year.The alliance delivers significant benefits for both sports: a unique and complete pathway for park players and elite athletes that includes contact and non-contact sports – designed so players never leave the game or the field at any point in time during the calendar year or period of their playing life; enhanced inclusiveness, retention, and access to greater, more diverse playing opportunities for all Australians; a better alignment and consolidation of people, resources and competitions across the country – working together on Touch Football and Rugby League under a joint NRL-TFA banner; curtain raisers for the elite Touch Football athletes to showcase their skills and speed on the world stage at State of Origin and Test matches and selected NRL/representative fixtures; a more effective, year-round calendar of events and utilisation of sporting fields’ and amenities under the NRL banner.At the heart of the strategic alliance is a reuniting of two kindred spirits – after over 40 years apart and now formally coming together as one sporting community. Establishing, arguably and compellingly, Australia’s largest sporting community – bringing together well over 1 million participants across the country involved in competitions.According to the CEO of Touch Football Australia, Mr Colm Maguire, the strategic alliance between Touch Football Australia and the NRL is a definitive ‘game changer’ for Touch Football (and Rugby League) and a watershed moment in the history and evolution of both sports.“Touch Football in Australia was born out of Rugby League and the opportunity to create Australia’s largest sporting community aligned with the NRL is as compelling as it is ambitious and fortuitous,” Maguire announced in Sydney today in conjunction with NRL Chief Executive, Mr David Smith. “And, there is a real opportunity to grow the profile of touch both as a recreational game and an elite sport,” he said.“Not only will our partnership with the NRL provide greater potential to expand the participation base and extend the reach and profile of Touch Football, it will also ensure the sport will benefit significantly from the NRL scale, brand and market and distribution presence,” Mr Maguire added.“Both parties will share in the potential synergies of alignment: particularly in terms of combined approach and effort, revenue growth opportunities, cost saving efficiencies including shared services, scale benefits and consolidated national resources. Another key feature of the partnership will be the creation of a dual track continuous pathway; from grassroots to elite for both contact and non-contact forms of the game,” he added.“The corollary to this is the NRL will position Touch Football as its primary recreational game providing greater options for players, catering for all shapes, sizes and skill levels: expanding significantly their age demographics from ages 5 to 70-plus years old and increasing their female participation base, product offerings and mutually beneficial commercial leveraging opportunities,” Mr Maguire added.“Significantly, the partnership enables Touch Football to realise its vision articulated in its strategic plan, to become Australia’s leading community sport through strategic partnerships,” Mr Maguire said.The alignment of Touch Football under the joint NRL-TFA umbrella and operations will be in effect an alignment of like minds, resources, people and approaches. Touch Football Australia Chair, Mr Michael Rush, added that while this has been a very carefully considered process over an extended period of time, the development of the partnership and the announcement at this junction is at the right time for both sports and tremendously exciting.“I can assure all stakeholders connected to our sport that the TFA Board of Management and executive have undertaken a very thorough and demanding assessment and consideration of what this partnership means for our future. We have been diligent and professional while speculating on the exciting outcomes that can be achieved within a collaborative proposition,” Mr Rush said.“It is our firm view that this strategic alliance is in the very best interests of the sport and our membership. What has truly been encouraging is the fact that our new partner has an identical view.“We are very fortunate to be in the position we are in today; our sport and our large and diverse membership naturally hold significant appeal to the NRL. And this is clearly both a validation and in large part a direct result of all the commitment, hard work and perseverance of volunteers, staff, players, officials and supporters everywhere that have made the sport what it is today,” he added. “I can assure all of our members and stakeholders that it is a very exciting time to be involved in the sport. It is a credit to all of our sport’s stakeholders that have built the sport and made this partnership possible. “The partnership also ensures we are best equipped now and in the future to meet the resourcing, positioning and pathway challenges impacting the crowded Australian sporting market,” he added.Mr Maguire added that from a whole-of sport perspective, the continued support of the Australian Sports Commission is pivotal to ensuring that the participation base of both sports expands and provides consolidation support for future growth.“The outcomes of the announcement will further support the participation targets funded by the Australian Government through the Australian Sports Commission. TFA is grateful for the ongoing contribution by the ASC ($570k in 2013-14) into the sport of Touch Football, particularly within the participation environment,” he said.Today’s official signing of the Memorandum of Understanding commits each party to finalise the terms of the partnership which will include discussions with the Australian Sports Commission.According to NRL’s Chief Executive, Mr David Smith, it is a time for great enthusiasm, excitement and optimism for the sport as the NRL enters into this significant growth stage in the game’s history.“The new agreement with Touch Football Australia is a key strategic step in growing opportunities for Rugby League,” Mr Smith, said today.“Not only will it see more than one million people play in unified competitions, it brings together people from every state and territory, from almost every age group and every demographic.“We have been very clear about our ambition to extend the profile and reach of Rugby League and working with Touch Football Australia will also enable us to pursue new commercial and marketing opportunities that we can leverage with new partners.”CONTACT:Julian Buckmaster – GM, Marketing, Communications and Partnerships, TFAP: 0438 777 993; E: julian.buckmaster@touchfootball.com.auFollow us through the week on Facebook (www.facebook.com/touchfootballaustralia) and Twitter (www.twitter.com/touchfootyaus) as well as YouTube (www.youtube.com/touchfootballaus); or keep up-to-date with all the news, event action and results by visiting us at the Touch Football Australia website – www.austouch.com.au.Related News:An Open Letter from TFA CEO; NRL-TFA Strategic AllianceMedia Releaselast_img read more

10 months ago​Arsenal midfielder Guendouzi: I made my impression in preseason

first_img​Arsenal midfielder Guendouzi: I made my impression in preseasonby Freddie Taylor10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveMatteo Guendouzi admits that he took the chances that were given to him in preseason.The youngster arrived from Lorient in the summer, but no one expected that he would make an instant impact on the first team.The 19-year-old has been a key member of the midfield under new boss Unai Emery.And he is happy that he has settled in so quickly.He said in an interview with Sky Sports: “Although it doesn’t feel like I had time to adapt, I did. “The key was when we went on pre-season to Singapore we played friendly matches and I was able to show my qualities to the staff and my team-mates, that time was really precious because when we came back here it was much easier to adapt to the team and the staff.”Everybody has helped me to integrate and be part of the club and for me to play without pressure, which I love to do. Because I started and played well from the beginning that helped me and my confidence for the games that followed.” About the authorFreddie TaylorShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

Dozens of North American securities regulators target cryptocurrency schemes

first_imgTORONTO – Dozens of North American securities regulators, including have joined forces to investigate and warn investors about cryptocurrency-related schemes.Operation Cryptosweep includes more than 40 regulators in the U.S. and Canada, including the Ontario Securities Commissioner, which issued a release about the investigation Tuesday.“Operation Cryptosweep contributes to our ongoing efforts to raise awareness about potentially fraudulent activity involving cryptocurrency products,” Leslie Byberg, OSC executive director, said in a statement.The project resulted in nearly 70 inquiries and investigations, and 35 pending or completed enforcement actions related to initial coin offerings or cryptocurrencies since the beginning of the month, according to a statement the North American Securities Administrators Association released Monday.NASAA members are conducting additional investigations into possibly fraudulent conduct, it said, and those may result in more enforcement actions. NASAA president Joseph P Borg called the announced actions “just the tip of the iceberg.”“The persistently expanding exploitation of the crypto ecosystem by fraudsters is a significant threat to Main Street investors in the United States and Canada,” he said.“Cryptocrimminals need to know that state and provincial securities regulators are taking swift and effective action to protect investors from their schemes and scams.”A critical component of the operation is raising public awareness about the risks of initial coin offerings and crytocurrency-related investment products.Investors should always check whether they are dealing with a registered individual or firm and carefully consider risks associated with investing in the novel space, said Byberg. Warnings and alerts about schemes in the digital currency space can be found on the OSC’s website.The provincial securities commission recently warned Ontario investors about five firms — BTCReal, BitSerial, Hypercube Ventures LP, CabinCoin OU and BaapPay Inc. — that appear to be involved in schemes targeting them.The firms are not registered in Ontario to solicit investments or provide advice on investing in, buying or selling securities, the OSC said, but appear to be encouraging investors in the province to trade or invest in cryptocurrencies.The U.S. and Securities and Exchange Commission’s chairman Jay Clayton applauded the efforts to police fraud in the initial coin offering markets.NASAA’s announced actions “should be a strong warning to would-be fraudsters in this space that many sets of eyes are watching, and that regulators are co-ordinating on an international level to take strong actions to deter and stop fraud,” Clayton said.last_img read more

Canada Post strike having critical impact on retailers eBay tells PM

first_imgOTTAWA — EBay is calling on the federal government to legislate an end to the Canada Post contract dispute, warning that quick action is needed to ensure retailers don’t lose out on Black Friday and Cyber Monday sales.The manager of the online sales giant’s Canadian and Latin American divisions says continued rotating strikes at Canada Post will result in significant losses for small and medium-sized businesses across the country.While those businesses have adapted as best they can to the strikes that began Oct. 22, Andrea Stairs says in a letter to Prime Minister Justin Trudeau that the adjustments retailers have made so far to avoid delivery disruptions are unsustainable.Meanwhile, Canada Post says it is now facing an unprecedented backlog of shipments, largely as a result of strikes at its major sorting plants in Vancouver and particularly Toronto.A spokesman for the Crown corporation says that, as of this morning, there were more than 260 trailers filled with parcels waiting to be unloaded at its Gateway processing plant in Toronto — and that number is expected to rise quickly.The prime minister warned last week that his government would look at all options to end the labour dispute if there is no significant progress in Canada Post’s contract talks with the Canadian Union of Postal Workers.The Canadian Presslast_img read more

President says fuel theft costs Mexico up to 35B yearly

first_imgMEXICO CITY — Mexican President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador says the country loses $2.5 to $3.5 billion annually to fuel thieves who drill illegal taps into government pipelines.Lopez Obrador said Friday that “there still isn’t an exact figure” on the losses. The state-owned Petroleos Mexicanos company hasn’t given out new figures on pipeline taps since September. The last report indicated that 11,240 taps were found in the first nine months of 2018, or about 41 per day.The illicit fuel-theft industry involves drilling taps, bribing or threatening oil company employees, stealing tank trucks to carry the fuel and turf battles between rival gangs.That has caused a surge in the number of homicides in states like Guanajuato, where fuel theft is rampant.Lopez Obrador has promised stiffer punishments for the crime.The Associated Presslast_img read more

Postmedias Paul Godfrey passes baton to Andrew MacLeod who takes on CEOs

first_imgTORONTO — Postmedia Network Canada Corp. announced Thursday that Paul Godfrey is stepping down as CEO and will be succeeded by president and chief operating officer Andrew MacLeod.Godfrey, who has been Postmedia’s CEO since the company was founded in 2010, will stay on as executive chairman.MacLeod joined Postmedia in 2014 as chief commercial officer and was named chief operating officer in 2016. He became president in October 2017 and continues to hold that title as well as CEO.The announcements came as the owner of the National Post and other Canadian newspapers announced a $1.4 million net loss for the quarter ended. Nov. 30.Revenue for the Toronto-based publishing group fell to $171.3 million from just under $189 million a year earlier, when Postmedia reported a profit of $5.8 million with the assistance from gains on asset sales. Companies in this story: (TSX:PNC.A, TSX:PNC.B)The Canadian Presslast_img read more