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SIGN OUR ONLINE PETITION TO SAVE LIFFORD COMMUNITY HOSPITAL

first_imgDONEGALDAILY.COM has an online petition to save Lifford Community Hospital from closure.We want our 100,000 monthly readers – good Donegal people at home here in the county or overseas in places like Australia, the USA, Canada and 90 other countries – to simply pledge your support to save the community hospital by signing into our comment box below and leaving a message of support.PLEASE TELL AS MANY PEOPLE AS POSSIBLE VIA OUR FACEBOOK AND TWITTER FEEDS LEAVE A MESSAGE OF SUPPORT IN OUR COMMENT BOX BELOW:  © 2011 donegaldaily.com, all Rights ReservedThe copying, republication or redistribution of donegaldaily.com Content, including by framing or similar means, is expressly prohibited by law.  Follow us on www.twitter.com/donegaldailyFollow us on www.facebook.com/donegaldailySell anything on www.donegaldailyclassifieds.com SIGN OUR ONLINE PETITION TO SAVE LIFFORD COMMUNITY HOSPITAL was last modified: February 17th, 2012 by BrendaShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:LIFFORD HOSPITALONLINE PETITIONlast_img read more

National FFA Convention photo highlights

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest     Fruit Production – Austin Dotterer, Smithville Dairy Production-Placement – Joanna Frankenberg, New Bremen Agricultural Mechanics Repair and Maintenance-Placement – Andy Holscher, Upper Valley CC Diversified Agricultural Production – Jacob Wuebker, Versailles Dairy Production-Entrepreneurship – Rachel Sherman, Big Walnut-DACC Diversified Crop Production-Placement – Justin Scott, Indian Valley Jacob Zajkowski, Anthony Wayne, won Plant Systems Division 3.   Matt Reese talked to some of the State FFA officers. The Covington Chapter won the Model of Excellence award. The Covington Chapter won the Model of Excellence award. Jackson Reppart Ridgemont sang in the National FFA Chorus. American Star in Agribusiness Finalist – Luke Scott, Wynford Kolesen McCoy was the candidate for National Officers from Ohio. American Star in Agriscience Finalist – Olivia Pflaumer, Zane Trace Todd Peterson, Miami Trace, was an American Star in AgriBUsiness finalist. Brayden Sponcil, Felicity-Franklin, rocks the drums. The Felicity-Franklin FFA Chapter rocked the talent show. Kolt Buchenroth talks to Olivia Pflaumer, Zane Trace. Kolt Buchenroth interviewed Luke Scott from Wynford. Matt Reese talked to Auston Dotterer after he won his proficiency award.American FFA Degrees – 438                                                         American Star in Agribusiness Finalist – Luke Scott, Wynford American Star in Agriscience Finalist – Olivia Pflaumer, Zane Trace American Star Farmer Finalist – Todd Peterson, Miami Trace Honorary American DegreeRoland Fisher, Covington National Officer Candidate – Kolesen McCoy, Global Impact STEM Academy National Proficiency Award Finalists (27)Agricultural Education – Bailey Lowe, Felicity-FranklinAgriscience Research Plant – Kayla Wyse, PettisvilleAgricultural Processing – Logan Schlauch, West HolmesAgricultural Mechanics Repair and Maintenance-Entrepreneurship – Brandt Coffman, Liberty UnionAgricultural Mechanics Repair and Maintenance-Placement – Andy Holscher, Upper Valley CCAgricultural Sales-Placement – Kylie Blair, Miami East-MVCTCBeef Production-Placement – Wyatt Mohler, Houston-UVCCDairy Production-Entrepreneurship – Rachel Sherman, Big Walnut-DACCDairy Production-Placement – Joanna Frankenberg, New BremenDiversified Agricultural Production – Jacob Wuebker, VersaillesDiversified Crop Production-Entrepreneurship – Rose Zeedyk, FairviewDiversified Crop Production-Placement – Justin Scott, Indian ValleyDiversified Livestock – Chyann Kendel, Twin Valley South-MVCTCEnvironmental Science and Natural Resource Management – Hunter Welch, MariettaEquine Science-Entrepreneurship – Shae Robinson, Covington-UVCCEquine Science-Placement – Hanna Shafer, Covington-UVCCForage Production – Montgomery Boes, Upper SanduskyFruit Production – Austin Dotterer, SmithvilleGrain Production-Placement – Reed Aller, St. MarysGoat Production – Alexandrea Stewart, Southeastern-RossNursery Operations – Eliza Mertz, Houston-UVCCPoultry Production – Cole Luthman, VersaillesSmall Animal Produciton and Care – Kelci Cooper, Houston-UVCCSpecialty Animal – Kayla Wilson, Western BrownSwine Production-Entrepreneurship – Jacob Fogt, AnnaSwine Production-Placement – Kyle Searson, Waynesfield-GoshenWildlife Production and Management – Jayme Pennell, West Holmes National Chapter Award-Premier Chapter FinalistsGrowing Leaders – Houston-UVCC, RidgemontBuilding Communities – Genoa-Penta, South CentralStrengthening Agriculture – Ridgemont National Chapter Award-Model of ExcellenceCovington-UVCC, Felicity-Franklin, Otsego, Ridgemont Three-Star Chapters – Amanda-Clearcreek, Black River, Bowling Green-Penta, Covington-UVCC,Felicity-Franklin, Firelands, Genoa-Penta, Houston-UVCC, London, Lynchburg-Clay, Marysville, McClain,Miami East-MVCTC, Miami Trace, Missinssinawa Valley-MVCTC, Mowrystown, National Trail-MVCTC,New Bremen, North Union, Northeastern-Clark, Otsego-Penta, Peebles, Ridgemont, South Central, Spencerville, St. Marys, Upper Sandusky, Valley View-MVCTC, Versailles, Wauseon, Zane Trace Two-Star Chapters – Cardington, Elgin, Pettisville National Agriscience Fair FinalistsAnimal Systems Division 1 – Abigail Paxton, UticaAnimal Systems Division 2 – Alyssa Myers and Lola Proffitt, Felicity-FranklinAnimal Systems Division 4 – Collin Wallace and Kolton Skaggs, RidgemontAnimal Systems Division 5 – Camille Stanton, Delaware Area CCEnviron Services/Natural Resources Systems Division 3 – Emily Stevens, New LondonEnviron Services/Natural Resources Systems Division 4 – Josiah Strahm and Jaden Hensel, RidgemontEnviron Services/Natural Resources Systems Division 5 – Kayla Wyse, PettisvilleEnviron Services/Natural Resources Systems Division 6 – Joseph Glassmeyer and Jared Hamilton, Felicity-FranklinFood Products and Processing Systems Division 1 – Austin Voshall, Global Impact STEM AcademyFood Products and Processing Systems Division 3 – Abigail Lister, Bloom-CarrollPlant Systems Division 3 – Jacob Zajkowski, Anthony WaynePlant Systems Division 4 – Landen Tull and Audrey Pinger, Felicity-FranklinPlant Systems Division 6 – Rebekah Grayless and Jordan Grayless, Eastern BrownPower, Structural and Technical Systems Division 1 – Chase Fyffe, Global Impact STEM AcademyPower, Structural and Technical Systems Division 3 – Braden Skates, PettisvillePower, Structural and Technical Systems Division 4 – Owen Barnes and Olivia Barnes, WestfallPower, Structural and Technical Systems Division 5 – Trina Orr, UticaSocial Science Division 1 – Bailee Amstutz, North UnionSocial Science Division 3 – Ian Hoffman, Millcreek-West UnitySocial Science Division 4 – Anna Wright and Lillian Fries, Anthony WayneSocial Science Division 5 – Trinnetee France, Eastern BrownSocial Science Division 6 – Justin Schobeloch and Darby Minor, Westfall Career Development EventsWinners TBD National Band ParticipantsThomas Rindfuss, Wynford National Chorus ParticipantsEmma Widmer, GibsonburgMason Snyder, WilmingtonJackson Reppart, Ridgemont National Talent ParticipantsMadison Baird, Felicity-FranklinCassidy Louderback, Felicity-FranklinBrayden Sponcil, Felicity-FranklinChole Quatkemeyer, Felicity-FranklinKatelyn Hanes, Tri-Village MVCTClast_img read more

Total Force Fitness and Cooperative Extension: Environmental Fitness

first_imgIn this week’s Friday Field Notes, we will explore the resources available through cooperative extension to promote environmental fitness. Total Force Fitness (TFF), combined with human performance optimization (HPO), engages service members, their loved ones, and units while they’re healthy and performing well. The TFF framework also provides tools to prevent health and performance skills from weakening. This focus on prevention is what’s called “left of bang.” Coordinating efforts from both left and right of bang—including taking steps to prevent injury, boost resilience, and promote recovery—are essential to sustaining Military Family health and readiness.What Is Environmental Fitness?Environmental fitness is defined as the ability to perform mission-specific duties in any environment and withstand the multiple stressors of deployment and war. Many theater specific environmental stressors can be identified, assessed, and mitigated before deployment. These stressors are typically categorized by their physical, chemical, or biological parameters and include heat, cold, altitude, ionizing radiation, noise, hazardous chemicals, ultrafine particulate matter, as well as biologic agents in food, water, or other media. Mitigation of these stressors can improve the environmental fitness of military members and their families. (see O’Connor et al., 2010).These scholars point out that a concept comparable to total fitness is also emerging throughout the civilian sector wherein medical facilities are merging with fitness facilities to holistically integrate healthy behaviors and lifestyles, to include diet and exercise, as part of the overall treatment of disease. As the health-challenged civilian and military populations expand, the management and prevention of both acute and chronic health conditions have become increasingly critical. To that end, numerous efforts at the federal and state level are investing in the possibilities of what is being called Outdoor RX. Originally, Outdoor RX was focused on children where studies found support for the use of outdoor exercise prescriptions in children. In its conception, Outdoor RX was a collaboration between the Appalachian Mountain Club and the Massachusetts General Hospital for Children that paired exercise prescriptions with guided outdoor programs to increase physical activity among children (See https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27834192).New Possibilities in the Environmental Fitness DomainMore recently, based on the work of land grant university and cooperative extension scholars and practitioners, applications of the Outdoor RX conceptualization have been applied to veterans, service members and their families. An important resource in this domain is the book “This Land is Your Land – Toward A Better Understanding Of Nature’s Resiliency-Building And Restorative Power For Armed Forces.”A MFLN series of webinars highlighted this growing area of interest (see https://militaryfamilieslearningnetwork.org/event/28813/ ). A bill introduced to congress on May 1, 2019, could make outdoor recreation an official treatment option for veterans suffering from mental health disorders (see https://www.outsideonline.com/2394553/veterans-outdoor-therapy-could-become-law). Similar bills are being presented and passed in state legislatures.Cooperative Extension in the Total Force FitnessCornell Cooperative Extension practitioner and scientist Keith Tidball was recently recognized by the Center for Jackson Hole for an award to be presented at the SHIFT (Shaping How We Invest For Tomorrow) annual festival, held each autumn in Jackson Hole, that explores issues at the intersection of outdoor recreation, conservation, and public health.  Tidball has been working with outdoor recreation therapy and returning combatants as well as others dealing with trauma for over a decade, and will be working with the Center for Jackson Hole to host a symposium focused on application for Outdoor RX lessons learned from the veteran community to the currently serving military community and their families, to enhance readiness and resilience.last_img read more

Shooters aim at boosting India’s medals tally further

first_imgThe Dr Karni Singh shooting range, India’s best medal hunting ground in the Commonwealth Games, is set to provide more successes for the host nation on the fifth day of competitions on Thursday.After having scooped up a bagful of medals, including several gold, the Indian shooters are all set to boost the country’s medals kitty further.Gurpreet Singh and Omkar Singh (10m air pistol-men), Lajjakumari Gauswami and world champion Tejaswini Sawant (50m Singles Rifle 3 Position-women), Vijay Kumar and Gurpreet Singh (25m Rapid Fire Pistol-men) and Asher Noria and Ronjan Sondhi (Singles Double Trap-men) would be seen in action.India are looking up to star boxers Akhil Kumar (56kg), Suranjoy Singh (52kg) and Manoj Kumar (64kg), for further medals, along with Amandeep Singh (46-49kg).The weightlifting arena, also among the most fruitful ones for the country, will see Sudhir Kumar (77kg) flexing his muscles.A lot of Indians are in fray in athletics that commenced yesterday with hopes resting on high jumper Hari Sankar Roy, new national sprint record setter Md Abdul Najeeb Qureshi (men’s 100m), seasoned Mandeep and Manjeet Kaur (women’s 400m).At the archery range the Indian compound men’s and women’s teams would also be trying to attain podium finish after qualifying for the semi finals.Women’s wrestling makes its debut today with events in 48 kg, 55 kg, 63 kg and 72 kg freestyle and Greco-Roman styles.Competitions continue in tennis, table tennis, squash and badminton where a lot of Indian interest remains.- With PTI inputslast_img read more

India vs New Zealand 1st Test: New Zealand end Day 3 on 331 for 5

first_imgNew Zealand were 331 for five in their first innings, in reply to India’s 487, at stumps on day three of the first cricket Test at Sardar Patel Stadium here on Saturday.Brief scores:India 1st innings : 487New Zealand 1st innings: 331 for five in 117.3 overs (Jesse Ryder 103, Kane Williamson batting 87, Ross Taylor 56, Brendon McCullum 65; Pragyan Ojha 2/80).In their innings yesterday, India scored 487 in the first innings with a career best knock of 69 by off-spinner Harbhajan Singh. NZ spinners Daniel Vettori, playing his 100th test, and Jeetan Patel shared seven wickets each.”I thought the New Zealand bowlers bowled very well,” Harbhajan said. “They are a good side and it will take some effort from us to win this match. Thankfully, we have enough runs on the board.”In the morning session, Patel took the important wickets of VVS Laxman and Sachin Tendulkar as India scored only 63 runs in 30.2 overs on a slow pitch not conducive for stroke-play.Laxman and Tendulkar made 40 apiece in a partnership of 66 for the fourth wicket, but the pair took its time, adding just 29 runs in the first hour.Tendulkar, 13 overnight, was unable to keep the scoreboard ticking as Vettori employed a short mid-wicket and short extra cover to prevent singles.Tendulkar departed when he tried to break the shackles, advancing down the pitch to a Patel delivery, but delivering an easy chest-high return catch. Tendulkar faced 133 deliveries and hit five fours.”I am happy with our effort because this is not a spin track and the ball is only keeping low,” said Patel. “I am particularly happy to have dismissed Tendulkar as it is probably the biggest wicket of my career.”advertisementLaxman, 7 overnight, was trapped lbw at the stroke of lunch.Left-hander Suresh Raina fell for 3 as he failed to judge the pace of the ball and gave an easy catch to McCullum at short cover off Kane Williamson in the other wicket to fall in the morning session.Mahendra Singh Dhoni (10) and Zaheer Khan (1) did not do much in the second session, leaving Harbhajan and Pragyan Ojha to unexpectedly boost their side in a 66-run stand for the ninth wicket.Harbhajan, whose previous highest score was 66 against Zimbabwe at Bulawayo in 2001, hit five fours and three sixes.”The pitch is very slow and I am happy to have got runs when they mattered,” said Harbhajan. “But my job (of taking wickets) is still left and this is just a bonus.”He didn’t take a wicket in his first five overs, but seamer Zaheer removed opener Tim McIntosh for a duck, and left-arm spinner Ojha bowled BJ Watling for 6.- With inputs from APlast_img read more

World Cup: U.S. Girds For Portugal

first_imgSAO PAULO — After arriving back at their rooms at 4:45 a.m., victorious American players skipped breakfast  on June 17, slept late, went for medical tests and turned their attention to Portugal.The U.S. opened the World Cup with a thrilling 2-1 win over nemesis Ghana on John Brooks’ 86th-minute goal. But Jozy Altidore, Clint Dempsey, Matt Besler and Alejandro Bedoya all got hurt to various degrees. Altidore, taken off on a stretcher after straining his left hamstring, appears unlikely to play against the Portuguese this weekend.“We’ve got to see how he now reacts the next couple days,” U.S. coach Jurgen Klinsmann said. “We’re full of hope that he comes back still in this tournament.”Players hope to become the first American team to win consecutive World Cup games since a 2-0 start at the very first tournament in 1930.“Woke up today, this morning, and you look at your Instagram and Twitter and you see the videos that people posted,” Bedoya said of fans back home celebrating Brooks’ goal. “It’s really cool, and I’m sure everybody feeds off this energy.”The match drew 11.09 million viewers on ESPN, a record for men’s soccer on the network. And after decades when U.S. soccer fans felt outnumbered — even at home games — players took notice of the raucous red, white and blue-clad crowd at Arena das Dunas in Natal.“It was an incredible feeling, the support we had from the fans in the stadium along with the fans in every part of the country. We felt that,” said midfielder Graham Zusi, whose corner kick was headed in by Brooks. “It just makes me want more of it.”But before the next game, the U.S. needs to heal a little.Dempsey, who set the tone when he scored 30 seconds in, had his nose broken by a shin to the face from defender John Boye when they battled for a header. Klinsmann expects him to play June 22 in the Amazon rain forest capital of Manaus.“I don’t know how much a mask can protect him,” Klinsmann said. “It was tricky during the game. He barely could breathe. He struggled with that. But once it’s broken, it’s broken. It will take time to heal completely.”Dempsey will be paired up front either with Aron Johannsson, who was ineffective as Altidore’s replacement, or Chris Wondolowski.Besler, like Altidore, went for an MRI. The defender felt soreness in his right leg late in the first half and was replaced by Brooks for the start of the second. “Matt is no problem. All fine for the next game,” Klinsmann said.Bedoya was hobbling before Zusi replaced him in the 77th minute. He said he had a hip pointer, the reoccurrence of an old injury, then also cramped up in his hamstring.Portugal also has injury issues and will have to change the right side of its defense. Pepe was ejected in a June 16 4-0 loss to Germany after he appeared to head butt Thomas Mueller. Right back Fabio Coentrao was taken off on a stretcher and forward Hugo Almeida limped off. Coentrao is out for the tournament.The U.S won its World Cup opener for only the third time in 10 tries, following a 3-0 victory over Belgium in 1930 and a 3-2 win against Portugal in 2002. The Americans advanced to the semifinals in 1930 and the quarterfinals in 2002.If the U.S. ties fourth-ranked Portugal and No. 2 Germany defeats Ghana, the Americans would head to their third match in prime position to advance. If the Americans and Germans win, the U.S. clinches with a game to spare.After delaying training by 45 minutes to wait out a huge traffic jam caused by Brazilians rushing home to watch the Selecao play Mexico, American subs practiced at Sao Paulo Futebol Clube’s Barra Funda complex. Those who saw significant time  on June 16 worked in the weight room and swimming pool.Klinsmann gave players a day off from training on June 18.  “Our bodies are banged up a bit,” Bedoya said.(RONALD BLUM, AP Sports Writer) TweetPinShare0 Shareslast_img read more

New sensing tool could aid in early detection of Dengue virus

first_img Source:https://www.bath.ac.uk/announcements/new-technology-could-detect-dengue-fever-earlier/ Reviewed by Kate Anderton, B.Sc. (Editor)Mar 12 2019Dr Paulo Rocha from the University of Bath’s Department of Electronic & Electrical Engineering is developing a low-cost integrative sensing tool for early detection of Dengue virus, using a novel platform containing electrical sensors to investigate the behavior of human cells infected with Dengue virus.When someone is infected by the Dengue virus it produces proteins, particularly ‘non-structural protein 1’ (NS1) which is secreted from infected cells. Using a three centimeter squared platform, the Bath-based research team will observe the electrical behavior of human cells in vitro infected by different concentrations of NS1.A better understanding of the electrical behavior of these cells, the researchers believe, will help create a more accurate and sensitive way of detecting the presence of Dengue virus.Related StoriesThe return of the measles: are we going backward?Puzzling paralysis affecting healthy children warns CDCExperts find previously unknown bacterial strain of the genus LeptospiraIn the future, it is hoped this research will lead to the development of a low cost, disposable, real-time wearable system for detecting Dengue fever as well as Zika virus and Yellow Fever virus, both of which belong to the same Flaviviridae family. This will be of particular benefit to communities in developing countries where access to healthcare may be limited and Dengue fever is particularly prevalent.Dengue fever is an incurable mosquito-borne tropical disease initiated by the Dengue virus. It is spread by mosquitos mostly in tropical and subtropical areas of the world with symptoms ranging from fever and muscle/joint pains to life-threatening Dengue hemorrhagic fever. Each year it is estimated 390 million dengue infections occur around the world. Of these, 500,000 cases develop into dengue hemorrhagic fever which results in up to 25,000 deaths annually worldwide.A method that doctors currently adopt to test for Dengue fever is by examining the presence of NS1 in a patient’s bloodstream through a simple blood test. However, many people who are infected by Dengue virus may not be diagnosed due to the concentration of NS1 being so low and therefore not detected. This prevents correct diagnosis and the early intervention of drugs to counteract and reduce the effects of the virus.Lead researcher and Assistant Professor in the University of Bath’s Department of Electronic & Electrical Engineering, Dr Paulo Rocha, said: “If we can detect Dengue fever earlier on, we can ultimately efficiently treat a person’s symptoms and prevent the virus from developing into a more serious infection.”By determining if there is a correlation with a cell’s electrical signal and the presence – no matter how little the concentration – of NS1, we can identify if someone is infected with Dengue virus earlier.”last_img read more

Risk of stillbirth increases by continuing pregnancy to 41 weeks gestation

first_imgMore than 3,000 babies are stillborn every year in the UK – a third of these are term babies (37 weeks or beyond) who were considered to be ‘healthy’ prior to their death. Prolonged pregnancy is a known risk factor for stillbirth and women are routinely offered induction of labor after 41 weeks’ gestation. This recommendation is based on evidence of increased stillbirth risk beyond 41 weeks. However, one in three women with a stillbirth at term loses her baby before this period. The magnitude of this risk is not routinely communicated due to a previous lack of robust evidence.Related StoriesPersonalizing Nutritional Medicine With the Power of NMRIt is okay for women with lupus to get pregnant with proper care, says new studyMaternal obesity may negatively affect children’s lung developmentThe researchers have now analyzed data from 13 separate studies in the UK, US, Denmark and Norway, which included 15,124,027 pregnancies, 17,830 stillbirths and 2,348 newborn deaths.Despite the stillbirth risk figures, delivery before 41 weeks did not increase the risk of newborn death (defined as a death during the first 28 days of life) – the risk was unchanged for births between 38 and 41 weeks of gestation. The risk increased by 87 per cent for deliveries at 42 weeks’ gestation compared to 41 weeks.Professor Thangaratinam added: “This is the largest study of its kind, and finally provides precise estimates of potential risks of stillbirth. Now that we understand the extent to which stillbirth risks increase with each week of pregnancy, we should be incorporating this information in all discussions around delivery plans in pregnant women at term.”We were surprised to see how much poorer pregnancy outcomes were for Black women – they were up to twice more likely to experience stillbirth than White women. Healthcare professionals need to take these added risks into account when developing care plans for these women.”Limitations of the study include variations in the definitions of low risk pregnancy, the wide time-span of the studies, loss of data due to exclusion of studies that did not provide stillbirth estimates in weekly intervals, and potential confounders affecting the outcome. Source:Queen Mary University Of LondonJournal reference:Muglu, J. et al. (2019) Risks of stillbirth and neonatal death with advancing gestation at term: A systematic review and meta-analysis of cohort studies of 15 million pregnancies. PLOS Medicine. doi.org/10.1371/journal.pmed.1002838 . While there is an additional risk of stillbirth at 41 weeks, compared to 40 weeks, it is small. Women who prefer not to have medical interventions such as induction of labor may therefore acknowledge this small additional risk, and choose to wait until 41 weeks so that they have more time to go into labor naturally. Meanwhile, other women may prefer to have discussions with their healthcare providers on induction after 40 weeks. So this is all about helping women make informed decisions on timing of delivery.” Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Jul 3 2019With every week that a pregnancy continues past term (37 weeks), the risk of stillbirth increases, according to an analysis of more than 15 million pregnancies led by Queen Mary University of London.The results, published in the journal PLOS Medicine, also included a small but significantly increased risk of stillbirth in mothers who continued their pregnancy to 41 weeks’ gestation (when women are routinely offered induction of labor), compared to those who delivered at 40 weeks.The researchers say that women who are 41 weeks pregnant should not be alarmed, as the risk is low – equivalent to one additional stillbirth for every 1,449 pregnancies, compared to delivering at 40 weeks.Compared to White women, Black women at term were also found to be 1.5 to 2 times more likely to suffer stillbirth at all gestational ages.Lead Researcher Professor Shakila Thangaratinam from Queen Mary University of London:last_img read more

New US tax law brings Warren Buffett a nice check 29 billion

Berkshire Hathaway, the holding company of US billionaire investor Warren Buffett, received a stunning $29 billion check last year from the US government, thanks to a new tax law that massively lowered corporate tax rates. Investor Warren Buffett, seen here speaking at an event early last year in New York with fellow billionaire Bill Gates, says in his new newsletter that his company received a $29 billion bonus in 2017 thanks to a new US tax law This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Buffett’s company adds to stakes in Apple and Phillips 66 (Update) Explore further © 2018 AFP Citation: New US tax law brings Warren Buffett a nice check: $29 billion (2018, February 24) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-02-tax-law-warren-buffett-nice.html In his much-anticipated annual letter to shareholders, Buffett explained that the company’s net gain of $65.3 billion in 2017 was only partly due to his employees’ efforts.”Only $36 billion came from Berkshire’s operations,” he wrote. “The remaining $29 billion was delivered to us in December when Congress rewrote the US Tax Code.” Still, Buffett assured stockholders, “The $65 billion gain is nonetheless real—rest assured of that.”The new law, greatly touted by President Donald Trump, lowered the tax rate paid by US corporations from 35 percent to 21 percent, allowing many to undertake major new outlays and others to book significant fiscal gains.Berkshire Hathaway wholly owns dozens of companies—from Dairy Queen to Duracell—and holds significant shares in large and diverse corporations including American Express, Apple, Bank of America, Charter Communications, Coca-Cola, Delta Air Lines, General Motors, Goldman Sachs, Moody’s, Wells Fargo and Southwest Airlines.’The Oracle of Omaha’Buffett’s newsletters are read with intense interest on Wall Street and beyond. Known as the “Oracle of Omaha”—after his birthplace in the Midwestern state of Nebraska—he is one of the world’s most successful investors and one of its richest men. Now 87, he has been investing since he first bought stock at the age of 11.His latest newsletter reports that Berkshire’s net earnings rose last year from $24.07 billion to $44.94 billion. The year also saw the company’s war chest swell to $116 billion in cash and US Treasury bills, financial manna that Buffett wants to use to make significant new acquisitions.The company’s often-impressive pace of acquisitions had slowed last year, he noted, when the prices asked for businesses “hit an all-time high,” amid what he called “a purchasing frenzy.” “Price seemed almost irrelevant to an army of optimistic purchasers,” Buffett noted.Still, he said, the company “will have opportunities to make very large purchases” going forward, with emphasis on those available at “a sensible purchase price.” Buffett said Berkshire would stick with a “simple guideline: The less the prudence with which others conduct their affairs, the greater the prudence with which we must conduct our own.”A hit from hurricanesBuffett also said that while Berkshire’s insurance holdings would take a $2 billion after-tax hit from losses caused by hurricanes last year in Florida, Texas and Puerto Rico, other reinsurance companies did far worse.And he estimated the chances of a “mega-catastrophe” this year—one causing losses of at least $400 billion—at 2 percent.”No one, of course, knows the correct probability,” he added. Buffett concluded with a little advice to fellow investors: “Though markets are generally rational, they occasionally do crazy things,” he wrote.”Seizing the opportunities then offered does not require great intelligence… (or) a degree in economics,” but rather “an ability to both disregard mob fears or enthusiasms and to focus on a few simple fundamentals.”Forbes magazine estimates Buffett’s personal worth at some $87 billion. He has undertaken—as part of the so-called Giving Pledge he co-founded with Bill Gates and Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg—to donate more than 99 percent of his fortune to charities, and has already given away some $32 billion. read more

What Is the Ionosphere And Who Is Steve

first_img Light up the skies The scorching-hot surface of the sun expels streams of highly charged particles, and these streams are known as solar wind. According to NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center, solar wind flies through space at about 25 miles (40 km) per second. Upon reaching the Earth’s magnetic field and the ionosphere below, solar winds set off a colorful chemical reaction in the night sky called an aurora. When solar winds whip across Earth, the planet stays shielded behind its magnetic field, also known as the magnetosphere. Generated by churning molten iron in the Earth’s core, the magnetosphere sends solar radiation racing toward either pole. There, the charged particles collide with chemicals swirling in the ionosphere, generating the spellbinding auroras. Scientists have found that the sun’s own magnetic field squishes the Earth’s weaker one, shifting auroras toward the night side of the planet, as reported by Popular Mechanics. Near the Arctic and Antarctic circles, auroras streak across the sky every night, according to National Geographic. The colorful curtains of light, known as the aurora borealis and aurora australis, respectively, hang about 620 miles (1,000 km) above the Earth’s surface. The auroras glow green-yellow when ions strike oxygen particles in the lower ionosphere. Reddish light often blooms along the auroras’ edges, and purples and blues also appear in the nighttime sky, though this happens rarely. “The cause of aurora is somewhat known, but it is not entirely resolved,” said Toshi Nishimura, a geophysicist at Boston University. “For example, what causes a particular type of color of aurora, such as purple, is still a mystery.” Aurora Phenomena Named STEVE Explained by NASAVolume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard Shortcutsplay/pauseincrease volumedecrease volumeseek forwardsseek backwardstoggle captionstoggle fullscreenmute/unmuteseek to %SPACE↑↓→←cfm0-9接下来播放Better Bug Sprays?01:33关闭选项Automated Captions – en-US facebook twitter 发邮件 reddit 链接https://www.livescience.com/65947-ionosphere.html?jwsource=cl已复制直播00:0002:1202:12Your Recommended Playlist01:33Better Bug Sprays?01:08Why Do French Fries Taste So Bad When They’re Cold?04:24Sperm Whale Befriends Underwater Robot00:29Robot Jumps Like a Grasshopper, Rolls Like a Ball00:29Video – Giggly Robot02:31Surgical Robotics关闭  This amateur astronomer’s photograph, taken on May 8, 2016, in Keller, Washington, was used in the new research about the celestial phenomenon called STEVE. The major structures are two bands of upper atmospheric emissions located 100 miles (160 kilometers) above the ground: a reddish arc and a green picket fence. Credit: Rocky Raybell Who is Steve? Beyond auroras, the ionosphere also plays host to other impressive light shows. In 2016, citizen scientists spotted a particularly eye-catching phenomena, which scientists struggled to explain, Live Science sister-site Space.com previously reported. Bright rivers of white and pinkish light flowed over Canada, which is farther south than most auroras appear. Occasionally, dashes of green joined the mix. The mysterious lights were named Steve in homage to the animated movie “Over the Hedge” and were later rebranded as the “Strong Thermal Emission Velocity Enhancement” ⁠— still STEVE for short. “We’ve been studying the aurora for hundreds of years, and we couldn’t, and still can’t, explain what Steve is,” said Gareth Perry, a space weather scientist at the New Jersey Institute of Technology. “It’s interesting because its emissions and properties are unlike anything else we observe, at least with optics, in the ionosphere.” According to a 2019 study in the journal Geophysical Research Letters, the green streaks within STEVE may develop similarly to how traditional auroras form, as charged particles rain down upon the atmosphere. In STEVE, however, the river of light seems to glow when particles within the ionosphere collide and generate heat among themselves. Check out a slideshow of fantastic auroras from National Geographic. Communication and navigation Though reactions in the ionosphere paint the sky with brilliant hues, they can also disrupt radio signals, interfere with navigational systems and sometimes cause widespread power blackouts. The ionosphere reflects radio transmissions below 10 megahertz, allowing the military, airlines and scientists to link radar and communication systems over long distances. These systems work best when the ionosphere is smooth, like a mirror, but they can be disrupted by irregularities in the plasma. GPS transmissions pass through the ionosphere and therefore bear the same vulnerabilities. “During large geomagnetic storms, or space weather events, currents [in the ionosphere] can induce other currents in the ground, electrical grids, pipelines, etc. and wreak havoc,” Perry said. One such solar storm caused the famous Quebec blackout of 1989. “Thirty years later, our electrical systems are still vulnerable to such events.” Scientists study the ionosphere using radars, cameras, satellite-bound instruments and computer models to better understand the region’s physical and chemical dynamics. Armed with this knowledge, they hope to better predict disruptions in the ionosphere and prevent problems that can cause on the ground below. Additional resources:by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeVikings: Free Online GamePlay this for 1 min and see why everyone is addicted!Vikings: Free Online GameUndoTruthFinder People Search SubscriptionOne Thing All Liars Have in Common, Brace YourselfTruthFinder People Search SubscriptionUndoGundry MD Total Restore SupplementU.S. Cardiologist: It’s Like a Pressure Wash for Your InsidesGundry MD Total Restore SupplementUndoKelley Blue Book2019 Lexus Vehicles Worth Buying for Their Resale ValueKelley Blue BookUndoArticles VallyDad Cuts Daughter’s Hair Off For Getting Birthday Highlights, Then Mom Does The UnthinkableArticles VallyUndoBirch Gold GroupThis IRS Tax Law is Sweeping the U.S.Birch Gold GroupUndo A dense layer of molecules and electrically charged particles, called the ionosphere, hangs in the Earth’s upper atmosphere starting at about 35 miles (60 kilometers) above the planet’s surface and stretching out beyond 620 miles (1,000 km). Solar radiation coming from above buffets particles suspended in the atmospheric layer. Radio signals from below bounce off the ionosphere back to instruments on the ground. Where the ionosphere overlaps with magnetic fields, the sky erupts in brilliant light displays that are incredible to behold. Where is the ionosphere? Several distinct layers make up Earth’s atmosphere, including the mesosphere, which starts 31 miles (50 km) up, and the thermosphere, which starts at 53 miles (85 km) up. The ionosphere consists of three sections within the mesosphere and thermosphere, labeled the D, E and F layers, according to the UCAR Center for Science Education. Extreme ultraviolet radiation and X-rays from the sun bombard these upper regions of the atmosphere, striking the atoms and molecules held within those layers. The powerful radiation dislodges negatively charged electrons from the particles, altering those particles’ electrical charge. The resulting cloud of free electrons and charged particles, called ions, led to the name “ionosphere.” The ionized gas, or plasma, mixes with the denser, neutral atmosphere.Advertisement The concentration of ions in the ionosphere varies with the amount of solar radiation bearing down on the Earth. The ionosphere grows dense with charged particles during the day, but that density subsides at night as charged particles recombine with displaced electrons. Entire layers of the ionosphere appear and disappear during this daily cycle, according to NASA. Solar radiation also fluctuates over an 11-year period, meaning the sun may put out more or less radiation depending on the year. Explosive solar flares and gusts of solar wind stir up sudden changes in the ionosphere, teaming up with high-altitude winds and severe weather systems brewing on the Earth below. Learn how GPS works with the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum. Earth’s ionosphere, a region of charged particles, stretches up to the border between Earth and space. Credit: NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center, Duberstein Watch an animation of the Earth’s magnetic field in action, from Nova and the Khan Academy.last_img read more