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Lieutenant Governor Brian Dubie offers farewell remarks

first_imgLieutenant Governor Brian Dubie offered his farewell remarks in the Vermont State Senate Chamber this afternoon. Dubie served eight years as the state’s second in command.Good AfternoonThank you for the opportunity to serve you as your Lieutenant Governor for the last eight years.It has been a privilege to have the opportunity to serve our state in elected office.I would like to recognize a few special people who are here this afternoon.My wife, Penny and my daughters, Emily and Casey ‘ my brother, Gen. Mike Dubie — Gen. Jon Farnham, who has just returned from a year of service in Afghanistan, and Martha Hanson, my Chief of Staff and Only Staff.And a special salute to Lieutenant Governor-elect Phil Scott. Congratulations, Phil.# # #Some of you have served for many years; others will start your service here in Montpelier today. As I conclude my service as your Lieutenant Governor, I would like to recognize the service of some special Vermonters.We members of the American Legion have a saying: ‘many gave some, some gave all’. The mother of a fallen service member is given the title of ‘Gold Star Mother’A Gold Star Mother named Marion Gray is with us today. Marion and Steve lost their son, Army Sgt. Jamie Gray, in Iraq, on June 07, 2004. He was 29 years old.Marion has chosen to serve others.In May 2006, Vermont’s Gold Star families chartered a bus together to go to the National Day of Remembrance in Washington DC.Army Spc. Chris Merchant died in Ar Ramadi, Iraq, on March 1, 2006. His parents, Gary and Janet, wrote at the time, ‘This weekend we find ourselves on a bus with many people just like us. They know and feel the same things as we do. We see that it is okay to cry, to laugh, to joke, to live.’From that bus ride the Vermont Fallen Families was born, with Marion Gray as its binding force.Last November 11, Vermont dedicated a new Vermont Global War on Terror Memorial at the Veterans Cemetery in Randolph, dedicated to all the state’s military who have served in war since the Sept. 11, 2001 attacks.The Grays, the Merchants, Ray DeGiovine, and all the other Gold Star families made the memorial at the Vermont State Cemetery a reality. Ray’s 25-year-old son, Marine Corporal Christopher DeGiovine, was killed in Anbar province in 2007. We must never forget these brave Vermonters and their sacrifice. Marion, thank you for your service. Thank you to all of Vermont’s Fallen Families.Another Gold Star Mother that I would like to recognize is Vicky Strong.Nate and Vicky Strong lost their son, Marine Sgt. Jesse Strong, in Iraq on January 26, 2005. He was 24. Jesse was loved by his community, and by his fellow students at Liberty University. Vicky has chosen to serve her state in a new way. She will serve alongside you here in Montpelier, as a member of the House from Albany, Vermont. She has much to offer. Vicky, we wish you the best of luck as you open a new chapter of service here in Montpelier.# # #On Monday, Sept. 19, 2005 Army Lieutenant Mark Dooley was killed in Ar Ramadi, Iraq. Mark was 27 years old.Mark’s mom, Marion said, “Mark had a unique sense of dedication, care and responsibility toward his family, friends, his military companions and his country. I remember the sensitivity in which he gave me a sealed envelope prior to his deployment to Iraq and his request that I promise not to open it unless he did not return. As promised, this document was only opened after his death and I am confident that sharing it will allow everyone to have the insight into the remarkable person who was my son.”In that letter, Mark wrote, “Mom, I have no delusions that reading or even hearing this letter read can fill my absence. Please forgive me for not being able to be there; but also remember that my leaving was in the service of something that we loved, and that most people can’t comprehend its scope. Cherish in your heart that it wasn’t done for any abstract reason like a flag or a foreign government’s success, but our sacred honor.”Friend and fellow Wilmington police officer Greg Murano now organizes an annual 5K race in Wilmington. A portion of this year’s proceeds was donated to help complete the Vermont Global War on Terror Memorial. His service has life and meaning.Kyle Gilbert was a soldier from Brattleboro. Sadly, Kyle was killed in Iraq on August 6, 2003. He was 20 years old. His mother Regina wrote me a letter that I would like to share with you today.She wrote: ‘I want you to hear this, my dream, I really never thought I would have a dream but now I do, I will one day travel to the road my son was on, on 6 Aug 2006, and touch and feel the ground he where he took his last breath, feel his pain and pray for him on that night. When Iraq is free, I will prevail and make my dream come true, please be there with me’.After Kyle’s death, Regina’s husband Herbert chose to join the Guard and was deployed to Afghanistan for a year. I received a text message from Regina when Herbert landed in the United States after his year in Afghanistan. Please join me in thanking Herbert for his service and Regina for her dream.We all need a dream to focus our service. What is your dream?# # #I would also like to recognize another special mother. She lived in Bennington. Her name was Sally Goodrich.Sally and Don Goodrich lost their son, Peter, on September 11, 2001. Peter was a passenger on United Airlines Flight 175, the second plane to crash into the World Trade Center towers in New York City.Shortly after Peter’s death, Sally learned she had ovarian cancer.Reflecting on her situation then Sally said, ‘Everything was destroyed, my life, my faith, my ability to live. I had nothing left.’‘Then in August 2004, a friend of Peter’s who served as a Marine major in Afghanistan sent an e-mail asking the Goodrich family to collect supplies for the children of a village in dire need of assistance.‘That was the beginning,’‘ Sally said then. ‘I call it the moment of grace. I knew Peter would have responded to that e-mail. I knew I had to, in his name. For the first time, I felt Peter’s spirit back in my life.’‘Peter’s father Donald said, ‘Peter was always searching for a better understanding of the human condition, suddenly it shone upon us, that here is a path that Peter would be on. Because he would be on that path, we were going to take it.’‘To honor his memory, the Sally and Donald created the Peter M. Goodrich Foundation, and conducted fund-raising to build and support three schools and an orphanage in Afghanistan.Don says, ‘Sally saw a need or saw something that would be fun, and that big old Irish smile would come out and things would happen.’‘Sally says of her work in Afghanistan, ‘I wouldn’t say it was a journey of faith, but I would say it was a journey that restored my faith, and it also changed my faith. I think about my faith, and I think about God in more open ways than I did before. I don’t know how to explain it except to say that my faith is now about action to help people. Helping these children with education, which is the future of Afghanistan, gave us our lives back. I’m so lucky to have found that. I don’t know how to thank them.’‘ Sally passed away on December 19, 2010.Thank you, Sally.We face challenges in our state. You have run for office to serve. The lives of these special Vermonters serve as inspiration to all of us. Each had a dream, like each of you. Each took a first step, like each of you. Each faced setbacks, as you will, and each served in a special way. Each of you can and will serve in a special way.These Vermonters made a difference. So will you.The Vermont State Senate lost its guiding beacon last August. David Gibson served as Secretary of the Senate from 2000 till the time of his death.When I was first elected lieutenant governor, the presiding officer over the Vermont Senate, I must admit I had never been in this Senate chamber.I met David, and David explained Mason Rules, rules of the Vermont Senate, the unwritten rules, and the traditions of the Vermont Senate.It has been my privilege for the last eight years to learn the traditions of the Vermont Senate. They were written on the heart of David Gibson.For the past half-century, Ernest ‘ David’s father; Robert ‘ David’s brother; and David wrote those rules and kept them alive.David really only had one rule. It ruled his entire life and was the basis for all the rules of the Senate: Do unto others as you have them do unto you.We serve in a legislature where strongly held beliefs carried by strong-minded people are bound to clash.David Gibson was a beacon of kindness, grace and integrity.He made us all better people than we would have been without his friendship. And we all loved him for this.David, we will miss you.May God bless you.I know that David would approve of your choice to succeed him, former state senator John Bloomer. John, I know you will wear the mantle well. Congratulations, and best wishes to you.I would also like to recognize and thank those others who serve year in year out to keep this chamber working well.Assistant Senate Secretary Steve Marshall.Journal Clerk Vanessa Davison.Calendar Clerk Priscilla Alexander.Office Assistant Roxy QueroCornelius Reed, Theresa Randall, and our Doorkeepers and pages.Thank you all for your service to our state.Serving in elected office is a unique way to serve one’s fellow citizens.But there are many ways to serve. I look forward to assisting Vermont by continuing my work with our friends in Quebec. Next time you are in Quebec City, look in the phonebook; I have a lot of cousins up there.As I reflect on my service, many have asked me about my post-election thoughts.Here is my perspective. I have run for office and lost before.As a matter of fact, one man I lost to will soon be Vermont’s new Secretary of Human Services. In November 2000, I lost to a fine gentleman named Doug Racine.A few months later, in April 2001, I was on a long run on Miami Beach, training for an upcoming marathon, on a layover with my airline job. I must admit, I was thinking about the election when a frantic boy ran up to me, asking for my help.I followed this young person to the water’s edge — looked out ‘ and saw three heads in the water a couple of hundreds yards out. Immediately, I headed out into the surf. As I swam out, I thought of the advice of my loving wife Penny — who happens to have been a lifeguard. ‘Never go in the water without a floatation device’– and I am thinking, ‘What do I do now honey? Oh well,’ I think, as I keep swimming.Soon, I had reached the first person in the water. It was a school-aged girl, and the look in her eyes confirmed that she was in trouble. Just like my wife predicted, she grabbed me frantically with her arms and legs around my neck. Fortunately, I was able to get her to shore.Then I headed back into the water, to assist another rescuer who had followed me out to bring the next young girl in.The short version of this story is my girl made it, and the second girl did not. I was on that beach because I had lost an election.The way I see it is, there is another person, on another beach for each one of us. Our job is look for the person and do our best in that moment.Marion, Vicky, Regina and Sally by their service remind us that there are many ways to serve. Thank you all for your service. I wish you the best of luck. God Bless you all.# # #last_img read more

Opponent preview: What to know about No. 11 Louisville

first_img Published on February 18, 2020 at 2:02 pm Contact Nick: nialvare@syr.edu | @nick_a_alvarez Syracuse (14-11, 7-7 Atlantic Coast) likely faces its last ranked opponent on Wednesday night when the Orange travel to the KFC Yum! Center to take on No. 11 Louisville (21-5, 12-3). The Orange have dropped two in a row, recently falling to Florida State by three points. The Cardinals have also lost two-straight after being upset by Georgia Tech and Clemson. Here’s what to know about Louisville ahead of tip-off. All-time series: Louisville leads, 18-10Last time they played: Hosting the Cardinals in late-Feb. 2019, SU won, 69-49. Elijah Hughes led with 18 points, six rebounds and a pair of blocks while Oshae Brissett and Buddy Boeheim chipped in 16 and 14 points. Syracuse also forced Louisville into its worst shooting performance of the season (25.9%) and held Jordan Nwora to 11 points. It was one of Syracuse’s last marquee wins ahead of the 2019 NCAA Tournament. The Cardinals report: Led by Nwora, Louisville combines good defense with better offense and features a nine-player rotation. It didn’t lose its first game until a neutral site matchup against Texas Tech on Dec. 10. Then the Cardinals bookended the new year with an overtime loss to rival Kentucky and a 13-point home defeat to Florida State. AdvertisementThis is placeholder textThey rank 12th in Division-I adjusted offensive efficiency, per KenPom, and 44th on defense. Those metrics sit second- and fourth-best, respectively, in the ACC. Their scoring is split among Nwora (the second-best scorer in the ACC with 18.2 ppg, only behind Hughes), 6-foot-10 center Steven Enoch (9.9) and forward Dwayne Sutton (9.2). By normally out-shooting (40.7% team 3-point percentage) and out-rebounding teams, Louisville poses one of the worst on-paper matchups with the Orange this season. In recent games, coach Chris Mack has turned to a lineup of Nwora, Sutton, Enoch and guards Lamarr Kimble and Darius Perry most often, per KenPom. How Syracuse beats the Cardinals: The task is daunting. Syracuse must limit the Cardinals’ 3-point shooting and have another stout rebounding performance. SU must follow the blueprint it used to upset Virginia on the road in mid-January. In Louisville’s last two losses, it’s shot a combined nine-for-51 from deep and averaged 60 points a game. And that’s with Nwora slumping. The junior has seven points in his last two games, and the Orange must keep him struggling to have any shot at an upset. Offensively, look for Syracuse to again rely on Hughes and Joseph Girard III for offense. A reemerging Buddy Boeheim can help crack a Cardinals defense that allows 43.4% of its points from 3. Stat to know: 7.5% — Louisville’s steal-percentage that ranks 287th nationally. SU shouldn’t be forced into many turnovers. KenPom odds: The Orange have a 20% chance of winning the game, per KenPom. The contest’s projected final score is 78-68 Cardinals.Player to watch: Darius Perry, No. 2, Guard Perry is Louisville’s starting point guard and leads the team in assists (73). He’ll be the one trying to feed Enoch or Nwora in the high post of the 2-3 zone. The 6-foot-2 guard is a threat offensively as well, with a 40.6% 3-point percentage. While the Orange are occupied with Louisville’s forwards, it could be Perry who’s an X-factor.  Comments Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

Whirlwind finish

first_img“This had to be the wildest Daytona 500 I’ve ever watched,” Childress said. “I kept my eyes shut there for a little while it was so wild.” It took several moments for NASCAR to declare the winner, finally giving it to Harvick and spoiling what would have been the biggest victory of the 48-year-old Martin’s career. “I really wanted to win that thing,” Martin said. “They were going to have to pry it out of my fingers, man.” Harvick did just that, never letting off the gas as he charged from 29th to first in 22 laps. “My go-kart experience over the winter paid off, because I didn’t let off the floor and we just kept hitting things and the wall and bouncing off everything,” Harvick said. “But man, this is the Daytona 500. Can you believe it?” With the checkered flag in sight, Martin simply came up short – a mere length of a car hood – in a wild, wreck-filled finish. Harvick beat the sentimental favorite to win NASCAR’s premier race Sunday, six years to the day after Dale Earnhardt was killed on the final lap. Just days after his death, it was Harvick who was hired to replace him, and he rewarded Richard Childress with the car owner’s second Daytona 500 victory – Earnhardt won the other in 1998. After a cheating scandal nearly ruined the Great American Race, it was just the finish NASCAR needed to put racing back in the spotlight. Five teams were busted for breaking the rules during Speedweeks – including two-time winner Michael Waltrip, who broke the NASCAR code by tampering with his fuel before qualifying and humiliated Toyota in its Nextel Cup debut. The scandal put the sport in the spotlight for all the wrong reasons, and NASCAR ratcheted up its penalty process to prevent its biggest race from turning into a joke. Finishes like this one might fix everything. “Anytime there’s a good race on the racetrack, it helps mend things,” Harvick said. “But I think it’s still going to take a little bit to get over some of the issues that happened.” For at least one night, the talk will be of the victory Martin had in his sight and the way Harvick yanked it from him. Martin, making his 23rd attempt at a 500 win, could see the checkered flag when Harvick barreled along the outside of him. Just as Harvick pushed into the lead, Busch wiggled behind them and bumped into Matt Kenseth to start a melee. Kenseth was spinning and Greg Biffle was, too. Bowyer flipped onto his roof and through the grass, flames shooting through the windshield. But Harvick and Martin continued to race side by side, waiting for NASCAR to call for a caution. When it finally came, Harvick and Martin were at the finish line, and Harvick was just barely ahead. The winning margin was .123 seconds, and NASCAR had to review the tape just to be sure who was going to Victory Lane. Harvick never doubted the outcome. “I got so excited at the end of the race, and I knew we had won,” he said. “I just didn’t realize how excited I was, and I punched the dang mirror out of the car. Just overexcited, I guess. Knocked the mirror right out.” Martin finished second, followed by Jeff Burton, Harvick’s teammate, and Mike Wallace, who raced his way into the 500. Fifth place was rookie David Ragan, the kid who replaced Martin when he left Roush Racing this winter after 19 seasons. Martin left the powerhouse Roush team because he wanted to ease his way into retirement, and he got the opportunity to do it with a partial schedule at Ginn Racing – a second-tier team bought last year by a Florida land developer trying to satisfy his love of NASCAR. The decision was questioned by those who wondered if Bobby Ginn could give the ultra-competitive Martin cars capable of winning. Boy, did he ever. “I haven’t even seen the finish. It is what it is,” Martin said. “We were inches or feet or whatever. We were short. It was so close, but it was second. I let it slip away, slip through my fingers, and I’m fine with that. I am very proud of what this team did for me this weekend.” Martin led 26 laps and was out front when a five-car accident brought racing to a standstill with five laps to go. It made for an agonizing 11 minutes, 39 seconds for Martin, who sat idly in his car trying to plot his strategy during the stoppage. When racing resumed with two laps to go, Martin seemingly needed only to hold off Busch in a sprint to the finish. He weaved high and then low to block Busch’s attempts, which may have briefly distracted him from Harvick. Before the frantic finish, the race was shaping up to be a fight between Tony Stewart and Kurt Busch, who combined to lead 130 of the 200 laps. But they wrecked each other while leading the race with 48 laps to go. Stewart was leading coming out of the fourth turn when his Chevrolet wiggled just a bit. Busch, closing fast, couldn’t avoid running into Stewart’s bumper, and both cars careened into the outside wall. Busch, who led 95 laps in his bid to give car owner Roger Penske his first Daytona 500 win, was heartbroken. “We both got taken out of the Daytona 500 on my mistake,” he said from inside his car. “I made the first mistake. I apologize to (Stewart), but I know that doesn’t mean anything now.” Stewart, who led early but dropped to the back of the field after a pit road miscue, led 35 laps and just had surged back to the front when he wrecked. It dropped Stewart to 0 for 9 in Daytona 500s. “It just wasn’t meant to be today,” he said with a smile. “I’m still disappointed, but we’ve got a lot to be proud of. We had an awesome Speedweeks.” 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!center_img DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. -So focused was Mark Martin on hard-charging Kevin Harvick, he had no inkling of the chaos unfolding behind him. With less than a mile to go in the Daytona 500, Kyle Busch’s car was spinning. Clint Bowyer’s was upside down and on fire. Five other cars bumped and banged, careening into one another in a smoke-filled mass of twisted metal. last_img read more