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Blygen’s hat-trick lifts Boys’ Town in Locker Room Sports KSAFA Jackie Bell KO

first_imgMichael Blygen’s hat-trick rescued Boys’ Town from embarrassment against lower leaguers Maxfield Park, in their Locker Room Sports KSAFA/Jackie Bell Knockout game at Collie Smith Complex yesterday.The home team surrendered a two-goal lead to the Major League outfit, which came back from two-nil down to level at 2-2. But two late goals from the former Tivoli Gardens striker saw the home team win 4-2.After a dour and goalless first half, Boys’ Town went in front just before the hour (59th) when Blygen flicked the ball over the Maxfield goalkeeper and it fell into the goal. Minutes later, Chavanney Willis made it 2-0 when he latched on to a through ball and slotted home.However, the visitors responded minutes later when Romaine Mullington was on the end of a good build-up to tap the ball past the Boys’ Town custodian. And before Boys’ Town realised what hit them, Nico Reynolds, Maxfield’s best player, equalised with a rasping shot from the edge of the box.Maxfield nearly went ahead in the 80th minute, but referee Carvel Banton adjudged that the ball had not crossed the goalline. Then on the counter, Boys’ Town went straight up field and Blygen capitalised on a loose ball to make it 3-2.The former Humble Lion and Rivoli player sealed the win two minutes from time when he broke away and calmly slotted home.Blygen spent the second-half of last season in the Dominican Republic, but missed most of that campaign through injury.”So far in the Premier League, things have been very disappointing. I hope this will be a stepping stone for me to get more playing time and deliver for my team and try to help them make the top four,” he said.”Last season, I joined Boys’ Town in January, then went on a trial overseas in Dominica Republic. I made the team and played three matches, but injury got the better of me. But this season I am back, so I am just taking it a step at a time and doing my best and see what happens.”So I hope this hat-trick gives coach more confidence in me because I have always worked hard, but the team has been up and down; we are not being consistent. So I hope that this is a stepping stone for me to get time on the pitch,” he reasoned.Coach Andrew Price is also hoping this is a turning point for his striker.”I hope that this will be a catalyst for him (Blygen) to assist us in the third round. Boys’ Town always play better football in the third round, and we are preparing ourselves assiduously to really make a good run and see where it leads us,” he declared.Yesterday’s resultsBarbican 1 UWI 0Waterhouse 2 Maverley/Hughenden 1Boys’ Town 4 Maxfield 2Today’s games3 p.m. August Town vs Bull Bay at UWI Mona Bowl3 p.m. Olympic Gardens vs Real Mona at Cling Cling Oval3 p.m. Rockfort vs Cavalier at Rockfort3 p.m. Cooreville Gardens vs Arnett Gardens at Duhaney Park7 p.m. Harbour View vs Tivoli Gardens at Harbour View Stadiumlast_img read more

Softball Travels To Wildcat Invitational Hosted By No. 10 Arizona

first_img Arizona Live Stats Live Video (Arizona x2, Ball State, Abilene Christian) The Bulldogs face a strong Arizona team who is coming off a five-win opening weekend including a 4-0 win over then No. 21 Baylor. Senior third baseman Katiyana Mauga was named Pac-12 Player of the Week after hitting four home runs in four games with eight RBIs and a 1.357 slugging percentage. The Bulldogs are coming off a 4-1 performance at the UNI Dome-Classic which featured two victories over South Dakota State as well as Omaha and Montana. Wisconsin handed Drake its sole loss of the season with a 4-1 victory in eight innings. Drake was led by junior pitcher Nicole Newman (Madison, Wis.) who earned MVC Pitcher of the Week honors after compiling a 2-1 record with a 0.39 ERA and one save in four appearances, including a five-inning no-hitter in the first win over South Dakota State. Newman recorded 35 strikeouts in 18.0 innings for the Bulldogs in their opening weekend. Ball State Live Stats TUSCON, Ariz. – The Drake University softball team looks to continue its strong start as the teams travel to the Wildcat Invitational hosted by Arizona, Feb. 16-19. Drake opens the invitational against No. 10 Arizona on Thursday at 6 p.m. CST before taking on Ball State and North Dakota State Friday at 2 and 8 p.m., respectively. The Bulldogs will once again take on Arizona Saturday at 6 p.m. before facing Boston College at 8 p.m. Drake closes the tournament with a game against Abilene Christian Sunday at 12 p.m. The two games against Arizona, Ball State and Abilene Christian will be broadcast on the Pac-12 Network. Boston College Live Stats Drake also welcomed the addition of freshman Sarah Maddox (Henderson, Nev.) who batted .357 (5-14) in her first five career games. Maddox opened her career with an inside the park grand slam as well as another solo homerun in the Bulldogs’ 8-0 victory over South Dakota State in the season-opener. North Dakota State Live Stats Abilene Christian Live Stats Story Links Tournament Central Page Ball State and North Dakota State are both coming off 1-4 performances last weekend dropping multiple games by close margins. Three of the Cardinals loses were by three runs or less while North Dakota State lost their four games by a combined seven runs. Boston College went 3-1 last weekend including victories over the Houston and Wright State. The Bulldogs will close the weekend against Abilene Christian who returns to the field after a 3-3 outing last weekend including a victory over Iowa. Following the Wildcat Invitational, Drake travels to Lafayette, La. for the Mardi Gras Classic hosted by Louisiana where they will play six games in three days, Feb. 23-25. The Bulldogs open the three-day tournament against Bowling Green on Feb. 23 at 2 p.m.Print Friendly Versionlast_img read more

Like, Make a Tree

first_imgThree Darwinist professors lamented recently in Science1 that few scientists are making like a tree: “‘tree thinking’ remains widely practiced only by professional evolutionary biologists,” they said.  And just what is “tree thinking”?  It is basically thinking like Darwin; i.e., looking at the living world with phylogenetic glasses:The central claim of the theory of evolution as laid out in 1859 by Charles Darwin in The Origin of Species is that living species, despite their diversity in form and way of life, are the products of descent (with modification) from common ancestors.  To communicate this idea, Darwin developed the metaphor of the ‘tree of life.’  In this comparison, living species trace backward in time to common ancestors in the same way that separate twigs on a tree trace back to the same major branches.   (Emphasis added in all quotes.)What prompted this editorial?  “This is a particular cause for concern at a time when the teaching of evolution is being challenged,” they say.  But there’s a positive side, too: “because evolutionary trees serve not only as tools for biological researchers across disciplines but also as the main framework within which evidence for evolution is evaluated.”    While tree-thinking is useful for everyone, the art of generating trees is best left to the wizards:At the outset, it is important to clarify that tree thinking does not necessarily entail knowing how phylogenies are inferred by practicing systematists.  Anyone who has looked into phylogenetics from outside the field of evolutionary biology knows that it is complex and rapidly changing, replete with a dense statistical literature, impassioned philosophical debates, and an abundance of highly technical computer programs.  Fortunately, one can interpret trees and use them for organizing knowledge of biodiversity without knowing the details of phylogenetic inference.  The reverse is, however, not true.  One cannot really understand phylogenetics if one is not clear what an evolutionary tree is.They provide some examples of potential sources of confusion.  “Although closely related species tend to be similar to one another, this is not necessarily the case if the rate of evolution is not uniform:” for instance.  “Crocodiles are more closely related to birds than they are to lizards, even though crocodiles are indisputably more similar in external appearance to lizards.”    A statement like that would surely shock a novice.  It’s not the outward similarity, they explain, but the phylogenetic inference that counts.  Evolutionary history is not progressive, nor is it uniform.  In addition, we see only the tips of the branches inhabited by living or fossil organisms; occupants of the nodes (common ancestors of the branches) are only inferred, and may not have looked like anything alive today.  “Thus, for all its importance,” they caution, “tree thinking is fraught with challenges.”    But then how can anything fraught with challenges be important or useful?  Let’s revisit their motives for proposing that tree-thinking should extend beyond the cloisters of evolutionary systematics.  Here’s the bottom line:Tree thinking belongs alongside natural selection as a major theme in evolution training.  Further, trees could be used throughout biological training as an efficient way to present information on the distribution of traits among species.  To this end, what is needed are more resources: computer programs, educational strategies, and accessible presentations of current phylogenetic knowledge.    Phylogenetic trees are the most direct representation of the principle of common ancestry–the very core of evolutionary theory–and thus they must find a more prominent place in the general public’s understanding of evolution.  As philosopher of science Robert O’Hara stated, “just as beginning students in geography need to be taught how to read maps, so beginning students in biology should be taught how to read trees and to understand what trees communicate.”  Among other benefits, as the concept of tree thinking becomes better understood by those in the sciences, we can hope that a wider segment of society will come to appreciate the overwhelming evidence for common ancestry and the scientific rigor of evolutionary biology.1David A. Baum, Stacey DeWitt Smith, Samuel S. S. Donovan, ”Evolution: The Tree-Thinking Challenge,” Science, Vol 310, Issue 5750, 979-980 , 11 November 2005, [DOI: 10.1126/science.1117727].This article is very revealing.  The best way to understand it is to imagine oneself in ancient Babylonia, listening to some wizards of hepatoscopy (divination by reading the liver) lamenting the paucity of awareness of their craft among the astrologers and the general public.  They make a pitch in the Chaldean Journal about how useful hepatoscopy is to the general science of divination.  While admitting that their charts and diagrams are difficult to devise, they nevertheless argue that the charts are useful representations of fundamental insights, and took an awful lot of hard work to produce.  Their recommendation is to print more copies of their liver diagrams and instruct the young in the basic concepts of interpreting livers until the concept of liver-thinking becomes better understood and appreciated.    Far off?  Not by much.  Look what they admitted: phylogenetic inference from the actual data of biodiversity is “fraught with challenges.”  The field is “complex and rapidly changing.”  It has its own “dense statistical literature” impenetrable to those “outsiders” of the art.  It is an arena of “impassioned philosophical debates.”  One can imagine Babylonian hepatomancers in similar circumstances, adjusting their charts each time the king loses a battle despite their prognostication.  No problem; it’s all part of the “scientific rigor” of The Craft.    Notice also that tree-thinking is an a priori stance one takes before looking at the data.  It’s a world view: “the main framework within which evidence for evolution is evaluated.”  But what is being evaluated: the evidence, or the framework?  Since everything must fit into The Framework from the outset, no amount of change, debate, challenge or complexity endangers The Framework.  It is the grid through which all data must be sifted, the colored glass through which all wavelengths must be filtered.  This is very different from a geographical map with which they compare it (see analogy in the Baloney Detector).  A map represents visible data that can be corroborated in the present; a phylogenetic tree infers relationships in the unobservable past.  We do not conform the data to the map, but the other way around.  Not so with the Darwin Tree of Life.  Evidence is really secondary, because The Framework is already established.  Branches may shift here or there, but The Tree, as Platonic form, remains sacrosanct.  (You’ll notice that these wizards only bluffed about the “overwhelming evidence” for common ancestry and the “scientific rigor” of evolutionary biology; see 08/11/2003 and 06/13/2003 entries).    Rightly did Jonathan Wells classify Darwin’s tree of life as an Icon of Evolution.  An icon is a symbol, a representation of an article of faith.  The early icons of Jesus were not evidence for his divinity; they were reminders and representations of what the faithful already believed about him.  Proof of his divinity came not from the icons, but from the historical facts and eyewitness accounts of his miracles and resurrection.  As such, “icon-thinking” and meditation on the artistic representations would have constituted a weak apologetic.  The iconoclasts of early Christendom did not deny the object of the icons, but argued that the icons became idols, mere graven images that distracted one’s attention from the real person of Jesus Christ.  How much more an icon based on false premises and absent evidence will mislead a scientist and obscure honest investigation.  Like the icons of pagan gods adorning ancient temples, it substitutes a fantasy for the real world.    These three Darwin Party soothsayers want to short-circuit the proof from evidence and train novitiates by having them meditate on the icons.  They want computer programs, educational strategies and accessible representations of the products of their divination; they want to say, “believe, then interpret.”  They want to push this Framework, this faith – indeed, this religion – in the schools, to raise a new crop of devotees and practitioners of The Craft.  Such flagrant advocacy built on such shallow premises deserves a response in kind, from an iconoclast on that level.  We quote the noted philosopher Biff: “Make like a tree, and get outta here.”(Visited 20 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

November Featured Geocacher of the Month Nominees – Add Your Comments

first_imgRokman4( Member since 2008 )Rokman4Nomination by 2oddHOGs:“Rod spends a lot of time helping new cachers learn everything from the basics of geocaching to more intricate hides. When I first met Rod, he was giving a talk at a small town library. Rod is enthusiastic and thinks nothing of going over to a person’s home to help them with a computer problem or to take them out to find their first cache.  Rod was instrumental in setting up the first ever geocaching training ground, on a city owned recreational island, that will stay a training ground even now that the training event happened (close to 100 people attended).  Rod spent a lot of time working to make a contact with the city, showing them what he planned for the  island and getting the city’s support to hold the event and keep the island as the training ground. Rod is a terrific role model for those of us that are new the the game. ”nicgeo( Member since 2009 )nicgeoNomination by Mickelic:“Nicole is a geography teacher who uses geocaching to teach her students about latitude and longitude. She just wrote a grant for new GPS devices for her students and was awarded $500. Those who awarded the grant thought that her grant was the most unique and they featured Nichole in their monthly newsletter. I believe that she should be up for a nomination because, due to her excitement for geocaching, all of her students love going on field trips geocaching in our area. There is so much more about NicGeo which makes her the cacher of the month.” October Featured Geocacher of the Month, coast2coast2coastEvery month the geocaching community nominates people to be the  Geocacher of the Month – a geocacher who positively contributes to the community and stands out for his or her outstanding involvement in the activity. Groundspeak Lackeys choose three of the nominees and tell their stories here on Latitude 47. The community selects which of the three should be designated “Geocacher of the Month.”Last month, geocachers awarded the honor to coast2coast2coast. More than 50 geocachers wrote in support of the winner. Coast2coast2coast has hosted multiple events, helped direct the Mid Island Geocaching organization, and is known for his dedication to the geocaching community. Congratulations to all those who were nominated in October.Now it’s your turn to help select the featured November “Geocacher of the Month.” The nomination period is closed and we have whittled it down to the three geocachers featured below.Featured Geocacher of the Month GeocoinWrite a comment on this blog post about which of these three geocachers you feel should be November’s “Geocacher of the Month.” Those whose nominees were not recognized here are encouraged to submit their nominations again next month.Some testimonials have been edited for length. Comment below to tell us who you think should be the featured November “Geocacher of the Month.” A panel of Lackeys will use your comments to help decide which geocacher is awarded the honor. Each featured “Geocacher of the Month” will receive an exclusive special edition featured ”Geocacher of the Month” Geocoin along with a Geocacher of the Month hat and a certificate acknowledging their contributions signed by 2 of the founders of Geocaching.com. We will be accepting comments for November’s award through Monday the 24th.If you know an outstanding geocacher who should be the Geocacher of the Month, send an email to geocacherofthemonth@groundspeak.com.Every nomination must meet the following requirements:Geocacher of the Month Geocoin Please include your name, the name of your nominee, their username, at least one picture of the nominee and a description (500 or fewer words) explaining why he or she deserves to be the Geocacher of the Month. Please inform your nominee that you’ve submitted them for the award. Nominations for the December Geocacher of the Month must be received by December 3rd.Once we have received all of the nominations, we will choose the top candidates and post them on the blog. You will then get a chance to champion your favorite. Our goal is to involve the entire geocaching community in this process so we might learn from each other.Share with your Friends:More SharePrint RelatedAnnouncing the October ‘Featured Geocacher of the Month’October 25, 2011In “Community”Announcing the November Featured Geocacher of the MonthNovember 23, 2011In “Community”Featured Geocacher of the Month Nominees – Add Your CommentsOctober 13, 2011In “Community” _JohnnyCache ( Member since 2007 )_JohnnyCacheNomination by Bocco:“_JohnnyCache has volunteered countless hours of his time as the president of the Maryland Geocaching Society for the past two years. In that position Tom has worked tirelessly to promote geocaching in our state. He also provides links for helpful information, and detailed instructions on how to use various GPSr’s, software, etc., in our organization forums. He has created a Maryland Geocaching Society fanpage on facebook, and a smartphone app for our forums. _JohnnyCache is not only an enthusiastic geocacher in his own right, who has hidden some of the most devious cache hides in the state, he gives back to our community of cachers. His efforts as president of our society have enhanced geocaching in Maryland enormously.”last_img read more

Designing security into the industrial IoT

first_img RituGupta says: The development or design engineers are the ones that need to take the company’s security policy. They may also define factors such as how to identify and verify that a product is theirs and how to securely provide software and hardware updates and implement this in chips or software. The fourth part of the chain is where OEMs are involved in manufacturing products for IIoT networks, or in deployment of those products. Here, the production or operations manager needs to ensure that every electronic component has its own unique identity and can be securely authenticated at every point in the supply chain. In discussing the lack of a chain of trust in hardware and software, Robert Martin, senior principal engineer at the MITRE Corporation and a steering committee member of the IIC, said, “Connected industrial systems have so many different tech stacks.” In fact, he cautioned, “A small change in a microprocessor can have an unintended impact on the software running on it. If we recompile the software and run it on a different OS, it will work differently, but no one will be accountable for software failures resulting from the changes.” He added, “Compare this to the building trade, where you would be penalized for making changes that affected safety — there’s regulation, certification. But we just don’t have the same regime in software-based technologies.” Design considerations for IIoT security So where does one start with designing security for the IIoT, and what design considerations must be looked at? Various industry guidelines exist, such as the IIC’s IoT Security Framework together with its manufacturing profile providing details for implementing the Framework in the plant or the National Institute of Standards and Technology Cybersecurity Framework . The main task for the design engineer is determining how to translate a security policy or security framework into the design and lifecycle management of a device that forms all, or part of, an IIoT endpoint. The considerations range from enabling devices with unique identities to being able to protect the device, identify an attack, recover from it, remediate it, and patch the device. “The process is no different from safeguarding other systems,” said Chet Bablalk, vice president of solutions for IoT devices at Arm. “We need to think about security from the ground up.” He explained, “The first part is the analysis — what are the threat vectors and what are you trying to protect?” Arm introduced its own platform security architecture (PSA) last year to support developers of IoT devices. Babla says that the PSA is device-agnostic because the company is trying to encourage the industry to think about security. Analyze, architect, implement The PSA framework comprises three stages — analyze, architect, and implement. “Analysis is the core part of what we are trying to stress,” said Babla. This means, for example, conducting a threat model analysis, and Arm has introduced three analysis documents for common use cases in asset trackers, water meters, and network cameras. This analysis is essential and echoed by others. MITRE Corp.’s Martin commented, “We need to start talking about what the potential weaknesses are in the hardware and be able to emulate attack patterns and make test cases.”Design engineers need to think about the whole ecosystem, from chip to cloud, in terms of implementing a system that comprises an immutable device or one with a non-changeable identity; enabling trusted boot; and ensuring that over-the-air (OTA) updates and authentication can be carried out securely. “Then you can think about mitigation in silicon, the access points, and the cloud,” said Babla.Arm’s PSA framework encourages designers to first consider the threats and then look at design and implementation. (Source: Arm) privacy resilience Leave a Reply Cancel reply You must Register or Login to post a comment. This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed. Log in to Reply development engineer CxO level security architect March 24, 2019 at 9:14 am ChristopherJames says: safety March 24, 2019 at 7:08 am center_img Log in to Reply 2 thoughts on “Designing security into the industrial IoT” operations manager Share this:TwitterFacebookLinkedInMoreRedditTumblrPinterestWhatsAppSkypePocketTelegram Tags: IoT reliability “Considering that the whole system premise is based on information flying around. Of course a company has got to make sure that they have enough security in their system to make sure that their data doesn’t get compromised as it’s flying from one place to While design engineers might have to implement security elements into a chip, software, or platform, they may not necessarily be aware of how their work fits into their company’s bigger-picture security policies. “The security policy must be authored by both the IT team and the OT team together so that everyone knows what device is allowed to talk to what,” said Schrecker. Building a chain of trust A common theme is to establish a security policy and chain of trust from the outset and then ensure that it is maintained through design, development, production, and the entire lifecycle of a device. Trust must be built into the device, the network, and the entire supply chain. Haydn Povey, a board member of the IoT Security Foundation and CEO and founder of Secure Thingz, said that security needs to be addressed at four levels:  Continue Reading Previous Tackling security vulnerabilities of the industrial IoTNext How embedded projects run into trouble: Jack’s Top Ten – Number Four security We’ve all heard of the internet of things (IoT) and the industrial internet of things (IIoT). We know that the two are different: IoT is commonly used for consumer usage, and IIoT is used for industrial purposes. But how does a professional group like the Industrial Internet Consortium (IIC) actually define the IIoT? The group sees IIoT as a system that connects and integrates operational technology (OT) environments, including industrial control systems (ICS), with enterprise systems, business processes, and analytics. These IIoT systems differ from ICS and OT because they are connected extensively to other systems and people. And they differ from IT systems in that they use sensors and actuators that interact with the physical world, where uncontrolled change can lead to hazardous conditions. The benefits of IIoT are the ability of sensors or connected devices, as part of a closed-loop system, to collect and analyze data and then do something based on what the data reveals. The very connectivity, however, also grows the risk of attack — and, increasingly, cyberattacks — by those who may want to bring down the system. One of the many projects  under a Department of Energy (DoE) program to reduce cyber-incidents is being driven by Intel, looking at enhanced security for the power system edge. Because grid edge devices communicate with each other directly and through the cloud, the research is developing security enhancements to emphasize interoperability and provide for real-time situational awareness. First, this needs to be done in the form of a secure gateway for brownfield, or legacy, power system devices, then as an internal field programmable gate array (FPGA) upgrade designed as part of greenfield, or present-day, devices. The goal is to reduce the cyberattack surface in a way that doesn’t impede the normal functioning of the critical energy delivery functions. Sven Schrecker, chief architect of IoT security solutions at Intel and co-chair of the security working group at the IIC, said that security should not be the sole consideration when designing and deploying devices for IIoT systems, but developers should be thinking more broadly about five overall key factors:  “It is interesting to learn of different terms understood by different industries. Though the entire classification could be just within a single notion, the broader understanding seems quite vague and explorable. In the future, the varying industries coullast_img read more

NBA finals: Warriors close on title as Kevin Durant heroics beat Cavaliers

first_imgGolden State Warriors Reuse this content Read more Golden State Warriors 110-102 Cleveland Cavaliers: NBA finals Game 3 – as it happened Since you’re here… Share on WhatsApp Golden State Warriors v Cleveland Cavaliers: The biggest moments of the NBA finals so far – video Support The Guardian Share on Pinterest Share on Facebook Share on Messenger NBA finals LeBron James has pulled his Cleveland Cavaliers to an improbable NBA finals. But by early Thursday morning as he quietly walked out of his home arena in a purple warm-up jacket, it was clear he probably won’t be able to drag the Cavs to one last title before becoming a free agent at season’s end.The Golden State Warriors are too much for him and for his Cavaliers. In Wednesday night’s Game 3, James scored 33 points (while logging a 10th career NBA finals triple-double), limited Warriors star Steph Curry to just one successful three-pointer and still Cleveland lost, 110-102. Now, down 3-0 in the championship round, his dream of winning more than one ring with the Cavaliers is all but over. Friday’s Game 4 could be his last with his hometown franchise. Basketball match reports Topics NBA Cleveland Cavaliers 0:59 US sports On Wednesday, that joy was tested. Cleveland feed off the thunder of their home crowd, where they had won eight straight in the playoffs after dropping Game 1 of their first-round series with the Indiana Pacers, and the speakers in this three-tier arena downtown boomed. Huge flames shot from the scoreboard. And in the roar, most of the Warriors could do nothing as the Cavs pushed them around down low. Curry looked frustrated as he tumbled to the floor and Green growled at officials as both he and Curry picked up three fouls in the first half – with Green adding a technical for an early scuffle with JR Smith. The Cavaliers opened their biggest lead of the series at 13 points and maintained a double-digit advantage through much of the first two quarters, built mostly through the shooting of James and Smith and the rebounding of Kevin Love, who has quietly had a tremendous series. Cleveland might have run away with the, game as they have in others in this building, were it not for the Durant. As Curry and Thompson struggled with their three-point shooting early, Durant was unstoppable, using his long arms to shoot over the Cavs’ defenders, almost single-handedly keeping Golden State in the game at half-time when they trailed just 58-52.Then, as they often do, the Warriors exploded in the third quarter, using a quick 9-3 spurt after the break to level the score and taking off from there. JaVale McGee scored on a series of lay-ups, Curry started to find his shot and Durant kept pouring in bucket after bucket. Curry hit two free throws with 9:57 left in the third to give Golden State their first lead, stretching the margin to as much as five. Both teams battled through a tight one-possession game throughout most of the fourth, exchanging leads but also missing several shots that could have proved difference-making for either side. Curry continued to struggle to find his shot and Durant began to shoot wildly in an attempt to shoulder the load. But with just under three minutes left, the Warriors took control. Curry scored on a lay-up, then hit his only three-pointer of the night (after missing his first nine), followed by another three-pointer from Durant to put Golden State up 106-100 with 49 seconds remaining. Durant posed uncharacteristically as he released the ball. The arena that had roared all night was silent. “They hit big shots,” Cleveland coach Ty Lue said of the Warriors as he sat in a press conference after the game. He shook his head. “That’s what they do.” Share on Twitter Share on LinkedIn Play Video … we have a small favour to ask. More people, like you, are reading and supporting the Guardian’s independent, investigative journalism than ever before. And unlike many news organisations, we made the choice to keep our reporting open for all, regardless of where they live or what they can afford to pay.The Guardian will engage with the most critical issues of our time – from the escalating climate catastrophe to widespread inequality to the influence of big tech on our lives. At a time when factual information is a necessity, we believe that each of us, around the world, deserves access to accurate reporting with integrity at its heart.Our editorial independence means we set our own agenda and voice our own opinions. Guardian journalism is free from commercial and political bias and not influenced by billionaire owners or shareholders. This means we can give a voice to those less heard, explore where others turn away, and rigorously challenge those in power.We hope you will consider supporting us today. We need your support to keep delivering quality journalism that’s open and independent. Every reader contribution, however big or small, is so valuable. Support The Guardian from as little as $1 – and it only takes a minute. Thank you. Golden State are just too good and too deep for the Cavs, who are too often exposed as a one-man team powered by James. Wednesday’s assassin was Kevin Durant, the superstar forward who signed with the Warriors in 2016 with the hope of creating a dynasty. As Curry and Klay Thompson struggled with their shooting the night, Durant connected on six of nine attempts from three-point range, scored a playoff career-high 43 points and added 13 rebounds. Cleveland have been close in two games of this series and yet it was obvious to James as he fell into a chair at his post-game press conference that Golden State are too loaded. “That’s the challenge right there,” he said softly about the Warriors and their four stars: Durant, Curry, Thompson and Draymond Green. “There’s not really much pressure on them. Any of them can have a bad game. Someone else will score.”This is the great thing about Golden State’s looming dynasty, one that is on the verge of beating Cleveland for the NBA title for a third time in the last four years. They play free, without much angst when things don’t go well, adding to what James called “the level of stress” for opponents.It’s a notion that later made Durant laugh.“I think we all support each other … with a real child-like approach to the game,” he said. “That’s rare in the NBA.” Share via Emaillast_img read more

TOUCH-E-TALK AUGUST EDITION

first_imgThe latest edition of the online newsletter Touch-e-Talk is available for reading here:TOUCH-e-TALK, ISSUE 5, AUGUST EDITION 2005 This month’s edition is full of stories on the All Nations, Volunteers of the Month, a profile on Cathy Gray (a member of our National Technical Panel) and plenty more info for coaches and players.last_img

Australian Open Squads In Camp

first_imgAustralia’s Men’s, Women’s and Mixed Open squads will travel to Sydney this weekend for a training camp in preparation for the 2013 Super Trans Tasman Series to be held in Auckland next February.  The Australians are hopeful of continuing their strong form against New Zealand on the Touch Football field after their impressive 3-0 whitewash of their Trans Tasman counterparts in Mudgee earlier this year.  This will be the final selection medium for athletes to impress their respective coaches before teams are decided on and final preparation for the Open’s division title defence begins. The Super Trans Tasman will be the biggest Trans Tasman held yet, with 12 divisions – four Youth, three Open and five Masters – travelling to Auckland to compete. Stay tuned to the TFA website for all of the latest news in the lead up to the 2013 Super Trans Tasman Series – www.austouch.com.au.Related LinksAussie Squads In Camplast_img read more

10 months agoLiverpool legend Aldridge dismisses Guardiola Man City claims

first_imgLiverpool legend Aldridge dismisses Guardiola Man City claimsby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveLiverpool legend John Aldridge has dismissed the claims of Manchester City boss Pep Guardiola ahead of Thursday’s clash.Guardiola has declared anything but a victory will end their title defence.Aldridge told the Irish Independent: “Are Liverpool title favourites? Maybe we can say they will move into that position if they get a win against Manchester City at the Etihad Stadium next Thursday, but I still feel there will be a lot of twists and turns in this title story,” says Aldridge.”None of us saw these slips from Manchester City coming and it means Liverpool will head into the crunch game against them on Thursday night in an unexpectedly dominant position.”A draw in that game would ensure Klopp’s side still have a solid lead at the top of the table, while a victory would yield the pressure on a City side that have struggled to cope in the absence of Fernandinho and David Silva in recent weeks.”There is no doubt that Liverpool are in a great position, but this is only the half way point in the season and there is a long way to go, a lot of points to play for.” About the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

Mitsubishi board considers new allegations against Ghosn

first_imgTOKYO — Mitsubishi Motors CEO Osamu Masuko says the Japanese automaker’s board has met and discussed new allegations of wrongdoing by its former chairman, Carlos Ghosn.The allegations Friday regard a 7 million euro ($8 million) payment made to Ghosn last year by a 50-50 venture between Nissan Motor Co. and Mitsubishi Motors Corp., established in 2017 in Amsterdam.Masuko said only Ghosn, who headed Nissan for nearly 20 years, and some aides knew about the transaction, which was discovered during an investigation by Nissan and Mitsubishi.There have been no formal charges for the new allegations. Ghosn has been charged with breach of trust and falsifying financial reports in underreporting his income from Nissan.Masuko and Nissan Chief Hiroto Saikawa were directors at the joint venture called NMBV, along with Ghosn.The Associated Presslast_img read more