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City Market and Opportunities Credit Union (OCU) Team Up to Promote Small Business Growth

first_imgCity Market and Opportunities Credit Union (OCU) Team Up to Promote Small Business GrowthCity Market and OCU are offering low-interest business loans.Burlington, VTDecember 15, 2008 – City Market, Onion River Co-op, downtown Burlington’s cooperative grocery store, is announcing a new loan fund that will help small businesses to grow. The Co-op works with over 1,000 Vermont vendors and is committed to the sustainability not only of local agriculture of also of our local economy. Many of the Co-op vendors have expressed interest in a low-interest loan program in order to expand their businesses. Teaming up with Opportunities Credit Union, City Market is able to offer vendors a loan rate of 4.99%.To support a strong local food system, the City Market Loan Fund will help businesses purchase equipment, inventory, business vehicles, machinery, raw materials, or funds to purchase an income producing asset. Potential loan program participants could include existing small business owners, entrepreneurs, farmers and/or food producers looking to expand their current business, purchase/replace equipment, develop a new product line, increase production capacities and/or efficiencies. Start-up financing is not available under this program.OCU plans to review each business application and have sole discretion on approving loan requests. Businesses and owners must meet membership eligibility requirements of the credit union. Businesses that are not currently eligible according to OCU’s existing credit standards will be offered an action plan to address the barriers of their situation. For more information contact Greg Huysman, Small Business Lending Manager at 802-865-2003 x125 or ghuysman@oppsvt.org(link sends e-mail).About City Market, Onion River Co-opThe Onion River Co-op is a consumer cooperative, with over 3,200 members, selling wholesome food and other products while building a vibrant, empowered community and a healthier world, all in a sustainable manner. Recently awarded the 2008 Howard K. Bowers Fund Cooperative Excellence Award, City Market provides a large selection of local, natural and conventional foods, and thousands of Vermont-made products. Visit City Market, Onion River Co-op conveniently located in downtown Burlington, online at www.CityMarket.coop(link is external) or call 802-861-9700.last_img read more

Orca Activists Mark 50 Years Since Miami Seaquarium’s Lolita Capture

first_imgHe acknowledges that Lolita looks healthy, but has been trying to repatriate Lolita to her home waters in the Pacific Northwest. To that end, Garrett reiterates his call for Lolita’s release from the Seaquarium.“It makes us angry, it makes us sad,” Garrett says after seeing images of Lolita in a small tank at the Seaquarium. “It just makes us want to bring her home.”Orca Network executive director Susan Berta explains that the group has been holding vigils to mark Lolita’s capture for decades.“Of course, this year is different,” she says, adding that the virtual event allowed more people to participate.Among those who appeared in the video were Native Americans from the Lummi nation. They hold orcas sacred and are calling for the the release and return of Tokitae to her home aters.However, the Seaquarium says Lolita is best cared for in their hands.In an email to The Seattle Times last week, curator emeritus Robert Rose said the care Lolita has received at the Seaquarium for five decades is a “testament to the excellent care she receives daily from our animal and veterinary care staff.”Rose said relocating Lolita to the Pacific Northwest could endanger her. He also advised the activists to concern themselves with the addressing the plight of the critically endangered Southern Residents. Orca activists in Washington State on Saturday held a three-hour Zoom gathering in order to mark the 50th anniversary of Miami Seaquarium killer whale Lolita’s capture.Lolita, who had been named Tokitae by Native Americans, was estimated to be four years old on Aug. 8, 1970, when her captors in planes and boats used explosives to round up her family pod in the shallow waters of Penn Cove in Puget Sound, northwest of Seattle.The orcas were encircled with nets, at which point the men used sticks to separate the youngest orcas from their mothers.Five of the orcas drowned in the process, while a total of six other young orcas, including Lolita, were taken.It is believed that during the 1960s and 1970s, roughly four dozen South Resident orcas were captured and sold to marine parks.Washington State outlawed the capture and trade of orcas in its waters in 1976.Lolita is the only captured Southern Resident orca that is still alive.“It’s momentous, it’s amazing that she is still there, still alive,” says Howard Garrett, co-founder of Orca Network.last_img read more