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DDTV: SEE THE FIGHTERS PREPARE FOR THE BATTLE OF THE SWILLY II

first_imgWith just a week left to the Battle of the Swilly II, boxers from Glenswilly and Letterkenny Gaels are pushing hard to be in the shape of their lives! Simply click on the video to get a snapshot of how training is going in the countdown to next Sunday night’s big clash. DDTV: SEE THE FIGHTERS PREPARE FOR THE BATTLE OF THE SWILLY II was last modified: October 18th, 2014 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:Battle of the Swilly 2donegallast_img read more

CONTROVERSIAL JOBSBRIDGE ADVERT FOR DONEGAL GARAGE REMOVED

first_imgA Jobsbridge advert placement for a Letterkenny Garage has now been removed.The advert for three Jobsbridge places at Sweeney’s Spar garage at Ballyraine was advertised in recent days.Donegal Daily revealed this morning how the trainees would be taught how to pump petrol and wash cars. But Cllr Jack Murray complained about the Jobsbridge places saying they were not realistic.In recent hours the advert has been taken down from the agency’s postings.Cllr Murray says he now hopes the jobs will be offered to people with at least the minimum wage offered.CONTROVERSIAL JOBSBRIDGE ADVERT FOR DONEGAL GARAGE REMOVED was last modified: December 10th, 2013 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:Cllr Jack MurrayJOBSBRIDGElast_img read more

Taking a look at balancing food, energy and economics

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest January’s public program by the Environmental Professionals Network will look at humanity’s balancing act: producing enough food and energy, improving economies and social conditions, and protecting the environment, all while facing climate change and, by 2050, possibly 2 billion more people on the planet.“They’re enormous challenges,” said the network’s coordinator, David Hanselmann, a lecturer in the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State University.The network is a statewide professional group based in the college’s School of Environment and Natural Resources.The program, called “Adaptive, Resilient Land Management: Goals for the 21st Century,” is from 7:15 to 9:40 a.m. Jan. 26 in Ohio State’s Nationwide and Ohio Farm Bureau 4-H Center, 2201 Fred Taylor Drive, Columbus.Speaking will be:* Allison Thomson, science and research director at Washington, D.C.-based Field to Market: The Alliance for Sustainable Agriculture. The alliance, according to its website, works “to create opportunities across the agricultural supply chain for continuous improvements in productivity, environmental quality and human well-being.”* Ernie Shea, president and CEO of Lutherville, Maryland-based Solutions from the Land and coordinator of its North American Climate Smart Agriculture Alliance. The alliance is helping farmers and foresters understand and adapt to climate change while maintaining their productivity.Moderating the discussion will be Fred Yoder, a corn, wheat and soybean farmer from Madison County, Ohio, and a past president of the National Corn Growers Association. In 2013, President Obama honored Yoder as a “Champion for Change” for his sustainability and climate change work.“Agricultural producers, other landowners and our broader society face enormous challenges and opportunities locally, nationally and globally,” Hanselmann said. “With little exaggeration, life itself hinges on our success in these matters.”Registration for the event is $10 and includes breakfast. The deadline to register is Jan. 22. Details and a link to register are at go.osu.edu/Jan2016EPN.Contact Hanselmann at hanselmann.3@osu.edu or 614-247-1908 for more information.Sponsoring the event are the Ohio Corn and Wheat Growers Association, Ohio Soybean Council, and Ohio Farm Bureau Federation.last_img read more

Biobased fuels the subject of March workshop in Wooster

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Biobased fuels and products — those made from crops and waste from farms — are the focus of an upcoming workshop in Wooster.Advanced Biobased Systems: Growing an Industry is March 16 at the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center (OARDC), 1680 Madison Ave.It’s for anyone involved with or interested in the biobased industry, said organizer Ajay Shah, an assistant professor at OARDC and the head of its Biobased Systems Analysis Lab, the sponsor of the event.Expected to attend are farmers, scientists, processors, manufacturers, commodity representatives, and people in the ethanol, biodiesel and transportation industries, Shah said.“The potential of agricultural biomass as a renewable feedstock for fuels and chemicals continues to grow,” he said. “But there’s still a need to make biobased systems more efficient, environmentally friendly, and technically and economically viable.”Featured speaker is Iowa State’s KeenerThe workshop hopes to foster such progress, Shah said. Speakers from academia and industry, including featured speaker Kevin Keener from Iowa State University, will share their ideas and perspectives. There will be time for networking and discussion.Keener, who’s a food science and human nutrition professor at Iowa State and directs its Center for Crops Utilization Research and BioCentury Research Farm, will speak on “Biomass Utilization in Iowa: Research and Technology Development.”Also speakers from Ohio State, industryShah will present “Feedstock for Biobased Industries” based on his research as a faculty member in the Department of Food, Agricultural and Biological Engineering at The Ohio State University. Both the department and OARDC are part of the university’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES).Also scheduled to speak are:Denny Hall, director of Ohio State’s OBIC Bioproducts Innovation Center, on “Biobased Industries: Setting the Stage.”Ana Alonso, associate professor in Ohio State’s Department of Molecular Genetics, on “Pennycress as a Next Generation Feedstock.”Thaddeus Ezeji, associate professor in Ohio State’s Department of Animal Sciences, which also is part of CFAES, on “Biomass Conversion to Biofuels and Other Products.”Prabhat Krishnaswamy, senior vice president with Columbus-based EMC2, on “Utilizing Biobased Fibers for Composites.”Fred Circle, president of FDC Enterprises of Springfield, on “Feedstock Logistics for Biobased Industries” and “Bioproducts Case Study: Thermal Energy from Locally Grown Switchgrasses.”The speakers from Ohio State “will focus on their research, including the development of crops and processes for biobased energy and products,” Shah said.‘What’s happening in the real world’The industry speakers “will highlight what’s happening in the real world, including successes and challenges,” he said.The workshop is from 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. in OARDC’s Shisler Conference Center. Wooster is about 30 miles east of Akron, 60 miles south of Cleveland and 95 miles north of Columbus.Register by March 7, save $10Registration for the event, which includes continental breakfast, lunch and refreshments, is $50 by March 7 and $60 afterward. Details and a registration form can be downloaded at go.osu.edu/BiobasedWorkshop.For more information, contact Mary Wicks of OARDC at wicks.14@osu.edu or 330-202-3533.The OBIC center, the OARDC-based BioHio Research Park and Ohio State’s Sustainability and Resilient Economy Discovery Theme are also supporting the workshop.last_img read more

Ohio Ag Weather and Forecast — April 18, 2018

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest 180418_RyanMartinSun this morning will be followed by increasing clouds this afternoon as low pressure moves into east central IN by early to mid-afternoon. This low will bring moisture back into Ohio later this afternoon and then we see action holding through evening, overnight and into tomorrow morning. Moisture has about 60% coverage, and will be most significant over the northern half to third of the state. Moisture does not look that impressive, still under a quarter of an inch for the most part, although a few locations may push closer to a third. Liquid precipitation is expected through evening but temps fall tonight, meaning after midnight we may be able to see some mixing or change over to light wet snow. We do not expect any problems, and the wet snow will be limited in coverage. Precipitation in generally will mostly be over the northern half of the state and we can see the best wet snow chances tonight and tomorrow morning mostly near the lake. Temps do not look to fall off too far overnight, and that will help keep snow at a pretty low threat.We dry down and see clouds break up tomorrow afternoon and se should see sunshine in full force ahead of sunset. We then keep a dry pattern in our forecast dry for Friday through the weekend and through a good chunk of next week. For us in Ohio, the key day to watch will be Tuesday…mostly in the afternoon. The storm complex that we have been watching continues to fall apart. At this point, we don’t want to take action completely out, because we can see a few scattered showers over about 40% of the state. But, we are talking moisture of a tenth of an inch or less in that 40% coverage zone…which is down significantly from earlier this week. There is a good chance that most of us miss the action Tuesday. If that turns out to be the case, we will have a nice, long dry window emerging, as our next batch of moisture probably holds off until late on Friday night or next Saturday. So, keep your fingers crossed!There is still a good chance of moisture with a strong system around the 28th into the 29th. Moisture totals are not as impressive this morning, but we still are leaving the door open to some rains from .25”-1” over 70% of the state. Then we have an unsettled finish to the 11-16 day forecast window. Models are unsure how to handle moisture, but we do expected at least one more strong front between the 2nd and the 4th. The front likely has some strong to severe weather potential and can bring rains up to 1”. Timing is the main uncertain part to precipitation in early May.Temperatures likely do not get quite as cold as what we saw Monday again. However, we are still projecting a mostly below normal temperature profile through the end of the month. A couple of moderating days will be in there, but generally, we stay cool. Keep in mind, normal temps are rising, rather rapidly this month, as we pointed out before…but still, we do not see any significant above normal warming coming for at least several more weeks.last_img read more

Lawn Mowing Season

first_img RELATED ARTICLES GBA Encyclopedia: Green LandscapesProtect and Restore the SiteIn Defense of the Lawn I’ve never liked mowing the lawn. And it’s not just because of the gasoline used in the process.Lawns carry huge environmental burdens in this country, and we have a lot of them. I profiled some of these impacts once for an article in Environmental Building News back in the 1990s. From the information I found then, the total lawn area in the U.S. is 50,000 square miles — an area larger than the state of New York. We spend $25 billion per year on their care. We dump 3-6 million tons of fertilizer on them, and the runoff from those lawns is one of the largest pollution problems in our lakes and rivers.We apply something like 34,000 tons of herbicides, insecticides, fungicides, and other pesticides on them, accounting for a whopping 14% of total pesticide use in the U.S. — and 34% of insecticide use. On a per-acre basis, this amounts to about two pounds per year.And while not as big an issue in Vermont as elsewhere, we use a huge amount of water maintaining our emerald-green oases. “Kentucky” bluegrass is not from Kentucky (it’s from Europe), and it takes about 40 inches of water per year to keep it that lush green we’ve come to know and love. In much of the country, irrigating lawns is the single largest consumptive use of water (we use a lot more water in cooling thermo-electric power plants, but most of that water is only “borrowed” for power generation, then returned to the source), often accounting for 40-60% of total municipal water use. And then there’s the energy. Our fleet of 40 million lawn mowers consume several hundred million gallons of gasoline each year. And despite improvements in recent years, lawnmower engines aren’t as clean as car engines. While our mowers consume just a tiny percent of the gasoline used by our automobile fleet, they emit as must as 7% of VOCs (volatile organic compounds) in some areas. My own predicamentLiving in West Dummerston, Vermont, six miles outside of Brattleboro, I’ve tried to shrink our lawn area to minimize the need for mowing, and ten years ago we went out on a limb and bought a then-pretty-new battery-powered electric lawn mower. It’s a Makita mower — you-know (well, some of you guys know), that tool maker of the famed Miss Makita calendars.I’m pretty sure that Makita no longer makes an electric lawn mower, and ours never worked all that well. But our lawn area was small enough that the mower (mostly) did the job. In the last five years, as the rechargeable lead-acid batteries gradually failed, it got harder and harder to mow the entire lawn on one charge. We looked into replacing the batteries, but they were going to cost something like $250 — for a mower with all sorts of other stuff wrong with it that had probably cost about $400 when new. I just couldn’t bring myself to spend the money for new batteries.This year the batteries finally stopped charging altogether. What would we do about it?Being a product researcher (it’s an affliction that gobbles up hours but at least finds a useful outlet in our company’s green products directory, GreenSpec) I spent a while learning how far the industry had come in ten years. I still liked the idea of mowing our lawn using electricity — opening up the potential for generating our own power for that task) — but surely the industry had moved beyond our Makita-blue mower (that had lost its slick plastic cover when I removed it one time to see about replacing the batteries and lost the screws).Consumer Reports likes the Black and Decker 19-inch 36-volt mowers (either self-propelled or push-type). But neither Consumer Reports nor the local dealer in Brattleboro likes these mowers as much as gasoline-powered models. They aren’t stocked locally, so I’d have to special-order one. (If only more homeowners pushed for lower-impact products!)We may order one of these, but I’m also watching the technologies. Power tools are converting to more environmentally friendly lithium-ion battery technology in place of nickel-cadmium or sealed lead-acid batteries (the latter being what is used in the Black and Decker mowers). Do I really want to go out and buy a mower (for about $450) with lead-acid batteries and then see the newer technology come along as soon as I’ve bought it? (I have an inquiry into Black and Decker to try to find out if the company’s battery technology will be changing soon.)Meanwhile, my decision-making in the lawn-mowing department got more complicated by our purchase of a farm last fall. All of a sudden we have a much larger lawn to deal with — at least until we succeed in shrinking that lawn area. We’re now at the scale of lawn where a push mower may not be large enough. So far, we’ve been borrowing a generous neighbor’s riding lawn mower, but are less than enthusiastic about purchasing a new riding lawnmower that’s gasoline-powered.center_img Electric riding mowers?What’s the status of riding mowers with battery-powered electric motors? It turns out that there are some. But they’re quite pricey! The company Driven by Solar, Inc. makes the ReCharge Mower G2, a riding mower powered by a 36-volt, 85-amp-hour battery system. The mower has two cutting blades with a 30-inch width and seven cutting heights. The blades spin at 3,600 rpm, which is pretty standard for gasoline-powered riding mowers. The manufacturer’s suggested list price (MSRP) of this made-in-America mower is $2,599.Hustler makes the Zeon zero-turn commercial riding mower with a two-blade, 42-inch deck. The mower weighs in at a hefty 814 pounds with a roll-over protection system (ROPS) installed. The website claims the Zeon can mow a full acre on a single charge. It looks like a great machine, but carries a MSRP of $6,999, with a special Web price of $4,999 — out of our range.And at the top end of the (limited) scale of commercial electric riding mowers seems to be Mean Green Products, LLC. The company’s 36-volt RX-50 riding mower has a 50-inch deck and enough battery capacity to mow about two acres, according to the company. It weighs an even more prodigious 890 pounds, and the price is $9,900. Way out of our price range!These zero-emission, rechargeable electric riding mowers sound pretty good, but you can buy a decent gasoline-powered riding mower for half the price of the cheapest of these.I’d like to use an electric mower and charge it with my own photovoltaic power system, but the cost is just too high, and all of these models currently use lead-acid batteries, which may soon be obsolete and more manufacturers switch to lithium-ion batteries.I’m thinking the answer is to find a decent used riding mower on Craigslist and use it until a battery-powered electric model is affordable. By then I should have a PV system up and running.Or maybe I should buy some goats…. Alex is founder of BuildingGreen, Inc. and executive editor of Environmental Building News. He also coauthored BuildingGreen’s special report on windows that just came out. To keep up with Alex’s latest articles and musings, you can sign up for his Twitter feed.last_img read more

Creative Ways to Use Sound Effects + 15 FREE SFX

first_imgCheck out these 3 easy ways you can use SFX to add depth to your next video.Cover image via Shutterstock.The proper use of a single sound can change the entire feel of your production. Your audience might not notice it, but their their viewing experience will be better for it.Let’s have a look at three ways you can use SFX to improve your next project. 1. AtmosphereUse ambient sound to help create an atmosphere. The ambiance is simply the background sounds of your environment, whether it’s a crowd at a football stadium, a chorus of frogs croaking in a swamp, or the low rumble of a thunderstorm. I love watching a film that relies heavily on ambiance and natural sound. It brings me right into the environment. Watch the video tutorial and see how I’ve added several sound effects to help create the atmosphere of the interior of a commercial airliner.2. Logos and GraphicsAgain, the sound effects you choose help to communicate a mood or feel. Just as visuals contribute to branding, so too can audio elements. I’ve just added a text graphic to my airline clip, and I want to use a sound effect to help reveal the graphic. To do this, I’ve simply timed an airplane ding sound to match up with the first frame of the text graphic. I could pull from a wide variety of other travel-related SFX to reveal my main graphic. You can search through a variety of sounds here.3. MovementWhether it’s a character moving through the scene or simply a camera movement, sound effects can add life. From a snap zoom to a swish pan, a punch or a swinging sword, a good sound effect can complement a camera move. In this example, I show a gear-up style sequence wherein I’m prepping a backpack. The short montage includes a rapid-fire edit of close-up shots of the backpack. By adding a few whip and whoosh sound effects, I can make an entertaining sequence.Download 15 Free Ambient SFXLooking for some ambient noise? Here are fifteen free ambient SFX from the extensive PremiumBeat SFX library. Like all our music and SFX, these free ambient tracks are royalty free, and you can use them in commercial or personal projects. Read more about the FREE SFX pack here.DOWNLOAD 15 FREE SFXNeed royalty free music and SFX? PremiumBeat.com has a massive library of exclusive tracks and over 100,000 sound effects. Explore our catalogue.last_img read more

On Warriors and Worriers

first_img Essential Reading! Get my first book: The Only Sale Guide You’ll Ever Need “The USA Today bestseller by the star sales speaker and author of The Sales Blog that reveals how all salespeople can attain huge sales success through strategies backed by extensive research and experience.” Buy Now In sales, as in life, there are warriors and there are worriers.Be a WarriorIf you are going to succeed, you need to be a warrior. I’m not speaking of the blood and guts kind of warrior that might first come to mind. I mean you have to have the warrior’s mindset, the warrior’s heart, and live by the warrior’s code.To be a warrior, you have to pursue the warrior’s mindset. You have to believe that you can make a difference. You have to believe that what you are doing is important and valuable. You have to live for some great purpose.If you are going to be a warrior, you have to have the warrior’s heart. You can’t be afraid to take action. You can’t be afraid to mix it up. In order to win, you have to willingly put yourself at risk. You are going to get a little blood on you; sometimes it will be your own. Your heart cannot fear dying.Warriors have a code. Warriors have their honor, and it’s something they prize so dearly they are willing to die to protect it. No one ever has to wonder whether the warrior will come through. Their code demands it of them, and they keep the code.Be Not a WorrierWorriers are something less than warriors.Worriers have a mindset of fear and scarcity. They don’t believe they have the power to make a difference. They don’t live for a great purpose. They believe that they cannot succeed, that they won’t succeed, and that deck is stacked against them.Worriers are afraid to mix it up because they feel that they have to be subservient to survive. They don’t think about how to succeed, they think only of how to survive. Worriers never take risks or chances. Because they are afraid to die, they never take the actions they need to take to truly live.Worriers don’t live by the code. They don’t believe anything so strongly that they are willing to die for that belief. The have no honor, and so honor demands nothing of them.Worriers are something less than warriors.Every day, you are faced with a choice. You can be a warrior, or you can be a worrier. Your choice matters a great deal. Choose wisely, warrior.QuestionsHow is this post about sales?How is this post about how you live your life?What does this post have to do with the choices that you make?last_img read more

Bureaucrats to spend two days in J&K villages

first_imgAs part of its unique outreach programme, ‘Back to the Village’, the Governor’s administration in Jammu and Kashmir on Thursday designated gazetted officers to all the 4,483 panchayats in the State to seek feedback and share knowledge on government schemes.“The idea is to have a gazetted officer each in all 4,483 panchayats. It’s a first for J&K,” said Rohit Kansal, Principal Secretary, Planning, Development and Monitoring.Each officer has been directed to visit a gram panchayat and interact with the stakeholders “in a bid to innovate programmes, ensure participation and decentralise planning”.Under the ‘Back to the Village’ programme, around 4,500 gazetted officers will spend a minimum of two days, including one night, in the allocated panchayat.“It’s aimed at strengthening the bond between the government and the citizens,” said Syed Sehrish Asgar, District Development Commissioner, Budgam.last_img read more

Assam flood victims to get cash for utensils, clothes for first time

first_imgVictims of flood in Assam are set to get cash for a couple of items they were entitled to but never received for five years.The Assam Disaster Management Manual, 2015, prescribes utensils and clothes for the flood-affected people.Those staying in designated relief camps as well as those marooned and living in camp-like situation will now be given ₹5,000 each for purchasing these items. The payment would be made through direct benefit transfer.“The Deputy Commissioners of the districts have been asked to ensure the immediate transfer of ₹3,800 for purchase of utensils and ₹1,800 for purchase of clothes to the bank account of the head of the flood-affected families,” Assam’s Finance Minister Himanta Biswa Sarma said.“This has been in the manual, but will be implemented more or less for the first time,” he added.The Deputy Commissioners have also been asked to ensure distribution of cattle feed and free textbooks to school children in the flood-affected areas besides settling claims for rehabilitation grants for partially or fully damaged houses within one month.Relief and rehabilitation workers have been providing rice, pulses, salt, mustard oil, baby food, bleaching powder, phenyl, tarpaulin and generic medicines. Organisations such as All Assam Students’ Union said the State government has not been providing enough for the victims of the flood that has so far claimed the lives of 57 humans, 523 domestic animals and fowls and 199 wild animals including 17 one-horned rhinos in Kaziranga National Park.last_img read more